29

I have a question about my Stack Overflow post: Finding all the paths between two vertices with weight limit in a directed graph

Yesterday I asked the question linked above and today it was closed with a feedback "seeking recommendations". I honestly don't understand in what way my question asked for any recommendations except for how to solve my specific problem (finding the paths with a weight limit in a directed graph with loops) with a specific library (JGraphT), which is mentioned both, in the tags, and in the body of the question itself.

I don't see what part of the guidelines the question violates. I did provide a working solution using the same library (JGraphT) that I would like to improve upon because that solution is suboptimal.

I would like to understand why the question was closed (and also downvoted before) and how I could improve it so that it's reopened. The only potential improvement I could think of is mentioning the name of the library in the title of the question.

12
  • 3
    Potentially they misinterpreted: "I am wondering if jgrapht provides an API" as you asking about third party APIs, not sure though /shrug – Nick Feb 15 at 15:25
  • 10
  • 2
    @Tomerikoo, I posted a comment under the question itself because it was listed as one of the options in What if I disagree with the closure of a question? How can I reopen it? – ouid Feb 15 at 15:35
  • @Tomerikoo, I removed my comment there as well. I hope that someone will suggest me how the question can be improved so that I could edit it and put it for re-opening review – ouid Feb 15 at 15:42
  • I don't think personally you have much to change. I voted to open it. It could have been an honest mistake or a simple misunderstanding by the closers – Tomerikoo Feb 15 at 15:44
  • @Nick Asking about a specific third party API is allowed, asking which third party APIs you should use is not. – user253751 Feb 15 at 17:44
  • @user253751 Yes, I know that? – Nick Feb 15 at 17:52
  • 5
    @Seth A question tagged with [specific-question] is not really a duplicate of another [specific-question] question, unless the linked Main questions themselves are sufficiently similar. Even though both were closed with "seeking recommendations", they appear to be quite different questions, and the reasons for closing them were likely different as well. – cigien Feb 16 at 6:14
  • 3
    This is a little bit of a Stack Overflow thing in my experience. Close votes for "seeking recommendations" are very easily hip-fired when there are red herrings in the text. That is not something that will change any time soon because humans will stay humans so the only thing you can really do is read, re-read and re-re-read your question and try to remove suggestive wording from it. "I am wondering" false strictly in that category; you should not have to wonder anything, read the documentation and be sure. So don't say that in a question. – Gimby Feb 16 at 13:13
  • @Seth, I saw that question before I posted mine and I don't think it answers my question in a way other than what rene said in his answer about everyone being free to use their votes. I wanted to understand how my question could be improved and I guess that's what rene did with his edit. After reading guidelines about re-opening a closed question, it seemed to be the only viable option to ask about it here and attract attention of those who can cast re-open votes. – ouid Feb 16 at 21:46
  • @Seth I'm not sure if it's a good idea to send a message with that dupe like Q:"Why was my question closed", A: "It was probably a mistake / reviewers weren't paying attention" unless you want to make a giant "wall of shame" ring of posts – jrh Feb 16 at 21:52
  • 1
    Related: How should we handle “weasel words”, or unintentionally broad questions that aren't?. Close-voters should read the question more carefully, and not race to the Close link once they read "best" or "API". Also, what @Gimby says. – CodeCaster Feb 18 at 9:16
27

I have made a minor edit in that last sentence of your question to remove the idea that you're asking for a library.

I've also cast the final reopen vote. Your question can now be answered.

Everyone is free to use their votes as they see fit ("accountable" is a word some prefer to mention in this context). Why users downvote questions is only up for speculation, and the same goes for upvotes on PHP answers. Or RegEx.

If you get a good answer, future visitors might value your question more, leading to upvotes. When those upvotes happen is unknown. Allow for 6 to 8 weeks...

7
  • 13
    I upvote helpful PHP and RegEx answers. :D – Dharman Feb 15 at 16:58
  • 4
    I only upvote explained, correct answers to non-closable, [php] and/or [regex] questions ...sooo, not very often. – mickmackusa Feb 15 at 22:13
  • "Everyone is free to use their votes as they see fit." This is of course true for up/down votes, but are you also claiming this for close/reopen/delete/undelete votes as well? That's what your answer seems to suggest, to me at least. – cigien Feb 16 at 2:15
  • 1
    @cigien if anything, I'm certainly not going to close/reopen/delete/undelete as you see fit. Feel free to challenge my public votes. – rene Feb 16 at 6:56
  • 1
    @rene That's not what I meant at all, perhaps my phrasing was unclear. I meant that your answer seems to conflate the invisible/private votes (up/down) and visible/public votes (close/reopen/etc). One is not really accountable for the former, but as you say in your comment, users are accountable for the latter. That's not clear in your answer, especially since you haven't addressed why the linked question got close votes. – cigien Feb 16 at 7:02
  • 1
    @cigien my first sentence in my answer perfectly takes a guess why the question in question got close votes. Accountability isn't a factor when you vote, only when asked for. – rene Feb 16 at 7:30
  • 3
    Yes, your first sentence can be read as a guess as to why the question was closed. I like to state it more explicitly, but that's just a personal preference in writing style. To the second point, it seems we're just using the word "accountability" differently. One only has to justify a public vote when asked, but one is accountable for every single public vote that one casts. The justification is expected precisely because one is accountable. It's just a difference in our usage of the word though; I think we're on the same page about this. – cigien Feb 16 at 7:53
11

I often see one spurious "seeking recommendation" vote on questions in tags I follow ([assembly], [sse], etc.), often on questions that could (and should) have been answered by reading the documentation, typically the manual entry for a specific asm instruction.

Such questions don't explicitly or even implicitly ask for a link to documentation, but I think some people's thought process is something like "this person should have checked the documentation instead of posting this question, and a link to docs could be an answer", therefore "wanting an answer to this is wanting documentation", and "that's the same thing as wanting a link do documentation*. Thus they VTC with the "seeking recommendation" close reason.

(This is incorrect reasoning, multiple of those steps are obviously faulty, and that close reason doesn't apply in such cases. Those questions are usually just bad and if so should be downvoted, and often can be closed as duplicates, but other close reasons usually don't apply either.)

Note: I'm not saying your question was bad. I'm just sharing my experience seeing this close reason pop up when it doesn't apply on questions people happened not to like. Those other questions I'm referring to often are simple failure to check the documentation for the specific instruction that isn't doing what they want / expect. (In many cases I did agree with the downvote, and sometimes also close for too broad or unclear / needs details, but in other cases there was an interesting corner case that needed careful reading of the documentation and was worth addressing in an answer.)

It's possible someone could have applied the same faulty reasoning here, if they happen to know that jgrapht documentation describes how to do what you want with some function.

It's ok for the / an answer to be "there's a library with a function that does what you're looking for", as long as the question is a specific problem that could also be answered with a self-contained answer.

There's a grey area where what you're looking for is too big to expect someone to write for you as an answer, so only a "here's a library function" answer could really work. That would be implicitly asking for a library. I don't think that applies here, especially since you're asking how to do it with a specific library already in mind. That's very different: the ultimate goal of that close reason is to avoid answering being competing recommendations for different libraries, because including a whole library for each minor problem you run into while writing a program doesn't scale well in many languages.

5
  • 2
    Do we have a formal closed:RTFM? If not, should we create one? Officially designate “RTFM” as a sub-use of some other close reason? Or just allow such questions to remain, open for answering, and let them be voted up or down as the community pleases? (Some of my favorite answers on SO merely cite something buried in the documentation…) – JamesTheAwesomeDude Feb 16 at 16:09
  • 2
    I've seen these spurious/incorrect "seeking recommendations" close votes in the [android] tag and other places as well. Another common incorrect belief is that any question with the phrase "is there any API" is seeking recommendations, even when it's clearly asking for an API within a given SDK (i.e., the question is just "how to do $thing in $SDK"). – Ryan M Feb 16 at 16:59
  • 4
    @JamesTheAwesomeDude No, "RTFM" is not a valid close reason. This has been discussed before and there are a number of insurmountable objections to it. This has even been proposed network-wide, and the conclusion was the same: it's not a good idea. – cigien Feb 16 at 18:19
  • 1
    @JamesTheAwesomeDude No, there is no "this question has been answered on another site" close reason. If it's a popular language/library, odds are the question has been asked before in which case you can close it as a duplicate, but if it isn't a duplicate then as long as it's otherwise answerable it shouldn't be closed. – John Montgomery Feb 16 at 18:22
  • 1
    @RyanM and technically a lot of things are "APIs", the standard library / framework for your language is one, and even CPU instructions are a sort of "interface". A big part of programming is figuring out what API to use for what. E.g., you could copy the GPU's memory to the CPU to do processing on it. That would kill your performance in a tight loop but maybe it would be OK for a screenshot. I think it's OK to assume readers can handle information like that, I'd certainly want it. There's not one and only one answer, but it's not mostly subjective like "what is your favorite editor theme". – jrh Feb 17 at 16:41

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .