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I asked this question, which got closed for the following reason:

We don’t allow questions seeking recommendations for books, tools, software libraries, and more. Edit the question so it can be answered with facts and citations.

Ok, so apparently I asked a shopping question and was also told "You can edit the question or post a new one."

Ok, so I did that here, not asking for the point-and-shoot camera (the Docker base image in my case), but instead how to tell which point-and-shoot camera is good, you know, just like Jeff suggested.

Despite my effort, the new question got closed as well, for the same reason.

So what's wrong with my second question, Stack Overflow?
How does it not meet the guidelines?
How can I change it to meet the guidelines?

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    “or post a new one” — See “You can edit the question or post a new one”. – Sebastian Simon Feb 10 at 16:15
  • I'm gonna go against the apparent crowd on this one, and say that while the second question maybe could use some cleanup, it is indeed on-topic. Your central question in the first, closable Q was "What is a good choice for a base image that [has criteria]?". Your new one, though, is about how to understand base images, and asking how to parse through them effectively. At the very least, this is about a concrete problem, and is not searching for recommendations on base images themselves. – zcoop98 Feb 10 at 16:23
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    My advice to you would be to cut out the pieces of your question that make it look like a search for recommendations, and instead focus on your final question: "How do I choose a base image based on my requirements?" I would trim out the whole "Now I need a docker image that has..." section. – zcoop98 Feb 10 at 16:32
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    You should not ask another similar Question. The idea is that you edit the one that is closed. Every post matters. Even if they are closed or deleted. See What can I do when getting “We are no longer accepting questions/answers from this account”? to be ahead. – Scratte Feb 10 at 16:35
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    @Scratte: "You should not ask another similar Question." If this is so important, then why did nobody tell me this? Why was I presented the options to edit the question or create a new one? How am I supposed to know that choosing the second option is frowned upon? After all, the intent of my second question was to be different, to be non-similar to the first and thus acceptable. – user11398730 Feb 10 at 16:58
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    @user11398730 Stack Overflow expects you to use the Help Center to get familiar with the site. One of the first things a user get introduced to when creating their account is the tour. I noticed you have never read the tour. Though it's short, it ends with "Looking for more in-depth information on the site?" and a big button linking users to the Help Center. Ironically users tend to skip those things and go into using the site head first. This is unfortunate, since it seems to land users in a Question ban. – Scratte Feb 10 at 17:32
  • @user11398730 This is, unfortunately, a known problem with the site's UX. The site's staff have been asked to change the wording on multiple occasions, to prevent exactly the kind of problem that you've just run into, but for whatever reason, they've refused to do so. – F1Krazy Feb 11 at 13:39
  • I'm not sure you read the entire blog post you linked... it doesn't suggest you should ask "how to tell which point-and-shoot camera is good"... -> "Even if that was the case, technology moves so rapidly that the best shopping recommendations will be utterly obsolete within a year!" – Kevin B Feb 11 at 16:06
  • @KevinB then I'm not sure if you read the blog post I linked to entirely. What you quoted refers to the style of my first question, not the second. After what you quoted, further down it states "However, there is a way to ask these questions that avoids the inherent problems with shopping recommendations.", compares both styles of questions and concludes "The [how-to-tell] question may take some thinking, but its answer will be valid forever [...] ask us what you need to learn to tell what you should buy.", which to me pretty much sounds like a suggestion. – user11398730 Feb 11 at 16:36
  • yes, and then it goes on to explain why those aren't accepted anymore. "That’s what we concluded, and we explicitly disallowed shopping questions in the Super User FAQ:" – Kevin B Feb 11 at 16:36
  • What you should notice is that the recommendations for questions that are acceptable are asking about what features to look for in a camera, not which camera has x or y feature. – Kevin B Feb 11 at 16:38
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    @KevinB no it doesn't. That's at the end of the article. I don't see how the article states that "how-to-tell"-style shopping questions are not accepted anymore. In fact I think it makes the point that they are welcome. Again: "ask us what you need to learn to tell what you should buy.", which is what my second question does. – user11398730 Feb 11 at 16:43
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    @KevinB "What you should notice is that the recommendations for questions that are acceptable are asking about what features to look for in a camera, not which camera has x or y feature." this is exactly what I did in my second question, why I asked this meta question and why I linked to this article. – user11398730 Feb 11 at 16:45
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    @KevinB I really don't see how the article rejects questions such as the second. It is effectively a variant of "how do I select <thing> in list by <condition>". SO has tons of these where <thing> is some integer, username etc, and <condition> is "larger than 10" or "with a weird hairdo" or such. – MisterMiyagi Feb 11 at 16:54
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The short answer is that both questions appear to explicitly request a Docker image.

Let's be honest here. One can only think of two kinds of answers to this question:

  • One that links to a docker image from a public Docker registry such as Docker Hub. These are community maintained, can become outdated, and may attract opinionated answers and spam. So we would be clearly hitting all the disadvantages of hosting requests for off-site resources.
  • Or one with a complete Dockerfile descriptor, making the question look a lot like a "please write me a Dockerfile" kind of question. The usefulness of this is also questionable, in a similar fashion as to requests for a full program without an original attempt. This could become the way towards making the question on-topic, but you would then need to provide a better minimum reproducible example, preferably with the Dockerfile that you had so far.

how to tell which point-and-shoot camera is good

Note that the blog post was referring to a question that would be asked in photo.stackexchange.com. That site may well have different guidelines. On Stack Overflow, it is not OK to ask "which piece of core/software/technology/thingamajig is good for X". Instead, one should ask how to achieve X, describing the problem and what has been attempted so far. That it involves some docker image becomes secondary to the question.

You also fell trap to the subpar recommendation in the closure notice. "or post a new one" is a suggestion which has been a subject of scrutiny before, precisely because it incentivizes posting a new question to quickly overcome closure, rather than working with the community to reopen an existing one. In this case, the differences between the original question and the new one did not make the question any more on-topic.

See also:

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    "The usefulness of this is also questionable, in a similar fashion as to requests for a full program without an original attempt." - disagree. I don't need full program listings but I have had tremendous help from being able to see complete docker file listings, on Stack Overflow or elsewhere. This is comparing apples & oranges, docker files are not programs. It is configuration. Configuration which can be exactly the same for people using the same images to solve the same problems. – Gimby Feb 10 at 16:28
  • I have extended the second point, @Gimby. That's a fair point, but an attempt is definitely useful, especially to potential answerers. – E_net4 the downvoter Feb 10 at 16:30
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    -1: "Instead, one should ask how to achieve X, describing the problem and what has been attempted so far. _" this is exactly what my second question tries to do. To quote: "_How do I choose a base image based on my requirements[...]". How is it not doing that? - You say because it asks for a capabilities list. Just because I added a hypothesis of the existence of such a list to the end of my question makes my question open to be interpreted to solely ask for exactly that? Really? I'm sorry to say that I cannot quite follow that logic, please elaborate. – user11398730 Feb 10 at 16:50
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    @user11398730 My point is that "How to choose a Docker image" is not much better than before. It still falls under the request for off-site category unless it is focused on the main problem, which is to set up an image with a specific set of requirements. "Just because I added a hypothesis of the existence of such a list to the end of my question makes my question open to be interpreted to solely ask for exactly that? Really?" Yes. The way it was phrased does confuse curators and may attract more close votes merely because of that. – E_net4 the downvoter Feb 10 at 17:01
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There is nothing seriously wrong with the second question. The main problem is that it has a lot of flavour text, most of which is identical to the first question. You might want to call it guilt by association.

Your question basically condenses to this:

How can one choose a base image based on dependency and size requirements? For example, is there some way of listing/selecting capabilities of available images?

An example of dependencies are "C++ redistributable 2015" and "miniconda".

The rest is mostly noise that confuses people trying to help and curate.

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