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I recently commented on a question where the solution to the question was to clarify a common misunderstanding about the library that was used. I have previously seen the same misunderstanding solve questions of this type but it is very hard to find a duplicate for the close-as-duplicate vote.

The reason is that the symptom is too vague ("no logs") and the description of the problem varies too much. What should I do in this situation? Answering the question feels wrong due to the duplicate nature. Using only a comment also feels wrong, because than the question can't be marked as answered despite being solved.

Here is the actual question: Logging from a Python scritpt is not writing to the file when using TimedRotatingFileHandler

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    Common misunderstandings are exactly the sorts of questions which are commonly asked and potentially helpful to future site visitors (hence common). If it hasn't been asked before and there isn't a duplicate of it on site, I see no reason not to answer it... and maybe give the question an edit while you're at it to bring it up to snuff
    – Nick
    Feb 2 at 15:56
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    But I am absolutely sure there is a duplicate (because I have seen it). I just can't find it because the problem described is very different to what the actual problem is because it is based on misunderstanding the library.
    – blues
    Feb 2 at 16:11
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    Well there's What is the point of setLevel in a python logging handler? which covers it, but just because it answers the question doesn't make it a duplicate. /shrug Ultimately up to you, duplicates are only helpful if it's actually possible to find them
    – Nick
    Feb 2 at 16:22
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    You could always answer as a community-wiki and come back and close once you find a suitable dupe...
    – Tomerikoo
    Feb 2 at 16:36
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    Common misconceptions with symptoms that aren't specific to the misconception and that vary widely are rarely useful to future visitors because they're next to impossible to actually find until you know what's wrong. Closing as a duplicate is an effective way to sweep it under the rug... but it does nothing to solve the underlying issue of people who have the problem can't find the solution. Giving each one an answer doesn't necessarily help either.
    – Kevin B
    Feb 2 at 19:49
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    Yeah, there are a lot of duplicates out there, but if you can't find a good dupe with a reasonable amount of web searching, future askers probably won't be able to either. Answer the question and tune both question and answer so that it can be easily found. Feb 3 at 0:01
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    "... it is very hard to find a duplicate for the close-as-duplicate vote. ...What should I do in this situation?" Write a canonical question serving as duplicate target for all of them or use one of the existing questions and edit it to make it serve as a canonical duplicate target.
    – Trilarion
    Feb 3 at 11:17
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If you feel a question was asked before but can’t find a suitable dupe target, you might feel it’s wrong to answer because it basically has an answer. On the other hand, you do want to help the OP solve their problem.

In that case you can leave an answer as a community-wiki, by checking the box below the bottom-right corner of the text field.

Then, you can come back when you find the appropriate duplicate and link it (and possible delete the answer, but that’s not necessary).


I actually did exactly that here, as I feel this meta was asked before but can’t find it right now. Will update if I do ;)

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Remember that you do not have to solve every question you come across. There is no shame in doing what you can and then disengaging.

  • Comment if you think it might be some a duplicate, outlining the underlying issue. If you know how, shortly explain the fix of the issue.

  • Follow the question if you are sure a duplicate exists. You get informed when someone else proposes a duplicate.

  • Propose a duplicate if you know a duplicate solves the issue. Unless you have a duplicate-hammer, the community and OP can still weigh in if you are wrong.

Since the Stack Overflow search is notoriously bad, an external search engine might help you search for keywords, issues or answers by which you find questions. For example, the Google search site:stackoverflow.com python logging empty turns up the question Logging in a Python script is not working: results in empty log files with the same issue.

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    i never even noticed the "Follow" link til reading this answer. wow. thank you for opening my eyes! Feb 3 at 17:16
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    @pestophagous follow is a relatively new feature (meta.stackexchange.com/questions/345661/…) Feb 4 at 12:13
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    Fyi the question seemed similar enough to that link you shared in the comments that I went ahead and marked it as duplicate. Thanks!
    – cs95
    Feb 5 at 9:25
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If you can't find the duplicate post despite knowing what the issue is and presumably how to solve it, then the chances of them finding it are basically 0. That also goes for anyone else with the same question.

In that situation, I think it seems valid to just answer it. Next time you see it, then use this answer as the duplicate target (unless of course you find a better one in that time).

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A duplicate target is a post that answers the question of the OP. It doesn't have to ask the same question as the OP, as long as it solves the problem they are asking about.

Finding a good duplicate target on SO is quite cumbersome however. Experienced user moderators usually keep a whole lot of personal bookmarks for frequent "canonical dupes".

Maybe the community has a collection of these in the form of a FAQ somewhere? (I can't find one at a glance) If not, then maybe one should be created?

Some examples of how other language communities have solved it: tag wiki and tag wiki have added a collection of canonical dupes on to their respective tag wikis in the form of a FAQ, where you can go in and grab one when looking for dupes. The C++ community has solved this with meta tag for such questions.

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