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I know that such vague musings are off topic on a site dedicated to very practical matters like a miscalculated reputation point or witty pun about a tag burnination. But I can't help it, I want to talk about it.

I have a peculiar feeling that an answer is a precious resource that is not to be wasted, and when possible I prefer to leave a comment and/or a close vote instead of writing a full-featured answer.

When I try to reflect on such a feeling it comes out like this

  • first, sometimes I remember that I already gave an answer to exactly the same question but given that there are thousands of them, it's impossible to find anything in a reasonable amount of time.

  • then, it's sort of a programmer's feeling, being reluctant to produce a WET content. Like, if you have only one answer on the topic, you can refactor it over time: fixing bugs, making it up to date, adding cool new methods, etc.

  • when you write a lot of answers, most likely they are too localized. While being formulated in a much more generic way, like "How to do something?" from the question body it is evident that the OP positively knows how to do that but their problem is a typo in some irrelevant part of the code. As a result, when someone googles for "How to do something?" they land at the irrelevant answer.

Given all the above I limit my answering activity I just checked my answering activity and found that it was greatly reduced, to a couple of answers per month, which pretty much reflects the feeling. And also I found myself weighting every time, whether my answer will add something new or not. And if not, I would rather refrain from answering.

I just wanted to ask whether anyone else feels the same way? And whether it's even the right thing to do? (It isn't likely I'd change my stance but nevertheless it's good to know what others think).

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    "when possible I prefer to leave a comment and/or a close vote instead writing a full-featured answer" - Same!,... unfortunately there's a bunch of people that will pounce on that and say to write an answer or answer poor questions to get that sweet sweet rep – Nick Jan 29 at 14:18
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    The "problem" with writing the answer as a comment is that that comment can just as easily be removed, rendering the "helpfulness" of your comment moot. If, however, you can truly answer a question in the comments (especially a short one) then I feel it's very likely that the question is probably a typographical error or something very similar. There's also, very likely a good duplicate out there and I rarely find they take more than a single search to find. If you can point someone to a well maintained answer, then they have their answer. – Larnu Jan 29 at 14:22
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    If, however, you're leaving several comments to create an answer, then you should certainly be posting an answer, as (again), those comments could simply be deleted at any point; rendering the whole effort you put in pointless and it'll have no use to anyone in the future. (The irony that these comments are almost an answer, but meta does follow slightly different rules.) – Larnu Jan 29 at 14:24
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    I feel resistance to the investment of time required to post a full answer to a problem that can be pointed out in a comment in one sentence (and then someone else might write it into an answer, if the question stays open). I have that feeling, however wrong I understand it to be. – khelwood Jan 29 at 15:14
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    I feel like this question would be better without the first paragraph. – Dharman Jan 29 at 16:40
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    I've suspected for a while now that some users will sometimes vote to close a question purely because they think that answers are a valuable resource that they don't want to "waste" on that question. Thank you very much for confirming this. Based on the upvotes on this post, it appears that other users feel this way too. Please see TylerH's answer for details on the consequences of violating SO policy in this fashion. – cigien Jan 29 at 17:43
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    Also, it's unfortunate that while you're ostensibly looking for feedback, you only seem to be interested in feedback that confirms your feelings. At least, that's what is suggested to me by your last statement that you aren't likely to change your stance on any of this. I would suggest trying to incorporate the feedback that disagrees with your feelings as well, and perhaps even changing your behavior as a result of that. – cigien Jan 29 at 17:45
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    you guys are spilling your threats as though I make my living from helping people on Stack Overflow and them "consequences" are no less than making my family starve to death – Your Common Sense Jan 29 at 19:43
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    "I just wanted to ask whether anyone else feels the same way?" - Yes, I definitely do. Another point is that it'll leave too-localised questions without answers, leading to them being roomba'd after some time (if nobody else answers them). So I try to link existing answers instead, with a bit of explanation how they apply to the OP' code. "And whether it's even the right thing to do?" - that I have no idea of. My answering activity has declined, and I still get the same amount reputation, so why not? (Oh wait, why am I typing an answer in the comment section again…) – Bergi Jan 29 at 22:33
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    FWIW, I feel the same way – but it feels like answers are too precious to write one for this question. These days there are tons of questions that avoid being dupes just by technicalities, or by hiding in the noise, or by all similar questions being equally too localised. Nothing will change by us lamenting about it... – MisterMiyagi Jan 30 at 9:29
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    @YourCommonSense What, you mean you're getting weary of endlessly doing people's work for them, for no thanks, and for them to come back with inane shit like "doesn't compile, says 'missing semicolon'" (or worse "doesn't work"), like as if posting a Q on SO allowed them to suddenly turn their brain off and hand all responsibility for getting out of the hole they dug themselves into, over to you? How very strange.. ;) – Caius Jard Jan 30 at 12:38
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    Seems a bit odd to me that a Meta question tagged with [discussion] should have two close votes for "Opinion Based." Just sayin'. – Adrian Mole Jan 30 at 23:27
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    I share some of your feelings but not from the point of view of answers being precious, but more from the point of view of keeping the site clean. I have an obsession with finding dupes and will always give a quick search for a dupe before posting my own answer. I truly believe that if a question has an answer somewhere else it shouldn't be answered and closed. If someone believes they have a new input on the matter, they can post it in the dupe itself thus preserving the purpose of this site of being a repository of useful information – Tomerikoo Jan 31 at 12:53
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    @AdrianMole yes it seems odd to some, but in reality no discussion is welcome on this site. – Your Common Sense Feb 7 at 10:45
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an answer is a precious resource that not to be wasted, and when possible I prefer to leave a comment and/or a close vote instead writing a full-featured answer.

Answers are not a finite, limited resource; you can write as many of them as you want; answering one question does not inherently deprive another question from receiving an answer.

Likewise, close voting a question 'because you don't want to spend your answer resources' makes absolutely no sense. A question should be closed only if it is close-worthy, regardless of how much energy you might have at the moment to write a good answer. If you are hesitant because you think the question's already been asked/answered, especially by you, then take the time to find that Q&A and close this new one as a duplicate.

Also, as Larnu said in a comment, if a question can be satisfactorily answered in a comment, there's a fair chance the question has already been asked/answered (due to its likely simplistic nature).

Given all the above I limited my answering activity to a couple answers per month. And before answering, I am weighting whether my answer adds something new or not.

Wanting to answer only worthwhile questions is perfectly fine behavior. But it sounds from the other parts of your question that you might be applying this standard in a very harmful way.

If you're just feeling burnt out regarding answering, I would suggest taking a break from the site for a while, so that you can come back with fresh perspective and enthusiasm. If you stick around and continue close voting questions just because you don't want to answer them, you may end up getting suspended, or worse, wrongfully preventing someone from receiving an answer to their own question.

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    Why did you rollback the edits? The text in the question was edited, so I just matched your answer up with that. As it happens, the text has been edited again, this time a little more substantively. You might want to incorporate that into the quoted text in your answer. – cigien Jan 29 at 22:29
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    Answers are not pie. – Richard Chambers Jan 30 at 14:47
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    I am fully in support of this answer. Closing duplicates (and otherwise closable questions) does not necessarily mean that you are becoming an increasingly grumpy person. I have noticed that my own answer rate has plummeted -- this is because the longer I volunteer, the more I realize that a clear, complete, on-topic and unique question is an EXTREMELY RARE gem. After more than 10 years of feverish Q&A, all basic techniques are duplicates. Personally, when I feel myself burning out on SO, I shift my attention to CodeReview where deeper / more creative thinking is valued. – mickmackusa Jan 30 at 21:15
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    Answers are not a finite, limited resource True, but time is a limited resource. Otherwise, I think I agree with the rest of your answer. – user10957435 Jan 31 at 6:03
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    The motivation of people is also a limited resource, specially when lot of uninterested question flood the site. This is why lot of folks left. So like Chipster I agree with the rest of the answer but strongly disagree with that point. – Walfrat Feb 1 at 13:18
  • @Chipster time is a limited resource, but luckily there is more than one person around answering questions. Close voting a question you don't have time to answer makes no sense as a justification, because someone else probably does have time to answer it. – TylerH Feb 1 at 15:51
  • @cigien I rolled it back for two reasons: 1. my answer makes the most sense when the quotes I'm replying to are the ones I was responding to rather than edited ones. 2. the verbiage you edited was already completely removed from the question, so there was no reason to keep that specific modified wording. – TylerH Feb 1 at 15:53
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    I think you're missing the point about close votes. For me, I'd rather spend long finding a somewhat-decent duplicate or two and closing than writing a quick answer. Because a mediocre yet-another-variation on something question with a low-effort answer is just clutter for future searchers. I know this from searching for duplicates myself. So the less good the question, the more I'm willing to stretch the exactness of the duplicate + explaining in comments why it's a duplicate. I've certainly done that for questions I would have answered years ago, but I have higher standards now. – Peter Cordes Feb 1 at 18:40
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    @PeterCordes If you read my answer, you'll see I encourage closing questions for any prescribed reason (including duplicates) where appropriate (I've cast over 48,000 close votes on Stack Overflow, so I'm certainly in favor of the habit). The issue I take with OP's self-described behavior is that OP seems to be close voting questions purely because he doesn't want to answer them, and for no other reason. – TylerH Feb 1 at 18:50
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    The OP does not put it in those terms in the question. That's your interpretation, and after re-reading the question I don't see support for it. It sounds to me like the OP is saying they'd prefer to find a valid reason for closing, rather than write an answer, as their first choice of dealing with a question. Not that they capriciously close questions only because they don't currently feel like answering. Note the "when possible" phrasing. (I haven't checked the question's edit history or comments; perhaps you were answering a different question, before OP clarified their meaning?) – Peter Cordes Feb 1 at 18:54
  • @PeterCordes From the question: "[...] when possible I prefer to leave a comment and/or a close vote instead writing a full-featured answer." (emphasis mine) That pretty explicitly states OP is close voting as an alternative to answering. If OP prefers to determine whether a question is a duplicate rather than posting an answer, then why bother to state that? It's the default behavior people should be following: don't answer duplicates, flag/vote to close them instead. – TylerH Feb 1 at 19:14
  • If OP doesn't intend to say they are close voting questions as an alternative to answering, then as phrased their question is currently very unclear. – TylerH Feb 1 at 19:16
  • They don't say they ever cast a close vote when they can't justify it at all. If your answer made it clearer that you're guessing they might be closing in unjustified cases (to introduce your argument against doing so), that would be much better. My initial impression (before I finished reading your answer) was that you were against closing in general, because you were arguing against the question's behaviour, and my understanding of that didn't include any closing that wasn't justifiable. OTOH I see your point that a less charitable reading of the question is possible. That's a problem – Peter Cordes Feb 1 at 19:19
  • @TylerH That's true. I completely agree with you on that point. – user10957435 Feb 3 at 5:15
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Time is a finite, limited resource (for an individual human), and answering takes time. Therefore, answers are a finite, limited resource for one person. I can only answer X questions in a day, especially good answers, even fewer great answers.

That said, there are thousands of other people chomping at the bit to produce answers. Will they be good answers? Maybe. Great answers? Unlikely. But the question, if halfway decent, will get answered. And in some tags, it doesn't even need to be that good to get several answers.

Point is, answer as much or as little as you feel comfortable answering. Close questions that need closing (in other words, match the close reasons in the help center). Vote as you see fit.

But please, if you see a question that's been answered before, please at least throw a comment on the question with some keywords someone else can use to find the appropriate target. Don't just answer it because you don't feel like finding the dupe.

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    "answering takes time". I wouldn't be so sure in this regard. – Your Common Sense Jan 29 at 19:13
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    Good ones definitely do. I myself have spent more than a week on an answer. Anybody can write bad answers fast. Writing good answers takes a lot of time and effort. That is one of the reasons why we also expect questions to show that they took a lot of time and effort. – Jörg W Mittag Jan 29 at 19:55
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    Don't just answer it because you don't feel like finding the dupe. --> or answer it with a wiki answer and you can get back later to find the dupe – Temani Afif Jan 29 at 20:00
  • @TemaniAfif Except if that answer gets upvoted, then you and the OP can't delete the question, right? – Heretic Monkey Jan 29 at 20:06
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    you can if it's closed, after 2 days – Temani Afif Jan 29 at 20:08
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    It's unfortunate that finding duplicates often takes more time than writing a new answer. Time which the question-asker should have spent. – Andrew Morton Jan 30 at 22:16
  • @AndrewMorton True, but at the same time... doesn't that make it reasonable the asker posted his question instead of continuing his search? :) – Luaan Feb 1 at 13:13
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    @Luaan Doesn't that make it reasonable that the potential asker not take the time to write the question? :) – Andrew Morton Feb 1 at 14:23
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Answers aren't necessarily a precious resource. Your time certainly is, though. Answers take time (at least quality answers do), so I understand your hesitation to waste time on certain questions. Never feel obligated to answer anything. The site is grateful for whatever answers you decide to provide, but at no point should you feel bad about not answering something. Doubly so for low-quality questions.

sometimes I remember that I already gave an answer to exactly the same question but given that there are thousands of them, it's impossible to find anything in a reasonable amount of time

Your feeling is correct here. This is exactly the sort of question that should be closed as a duplicate, not answered all over again. If you can remember writing an answer to it, you can usually find that question/answer fairly quickly if you search through just your activity. For example, a search term of "user:285587 is:answer aardvark" would return all of the answers you've posted where you mentioned aardvarks. You can use "user:me" instead if you're logged in.

when you write a lot of answers, most likely they are too localized. While being formulated in a much more generic way, like "How to do something?" from the question body it is evident that the OP positively knows how to do that but their problem is a typo in some irrelevant part of the code. As a result, when someone googles for "How to do something?" they land at the irrelevant answer.

This is also the type of question that should indeed be closed. There's a specific VTC reason you can select for questions that are "too localized" or "unlikely to be useful to anyone except the asker". I'm not sure how that impacts search engine results, though (I'd be curious to learn, if anyone knows).

And also I found myself weighting every time, whether my answer will add something new or not. And if not, I would rather refrain from answering.

Sometimes I wish more people thought this way. If you add an answer that doesn't actually add anything new to the existing answers, your answer is likely to get downvoted or deleted as a duplicate. Adding a little bit of additional information to an existing answer via comment or edit is also an option. I'll go that route when another answer is almost what I would have said, but it's close enough that writing up an entire new answer would be a waste of time.

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  • I usually use google to look for duplicates or Q&As I want to link in a comment or answer. (site:stackoverflow.com ...). To find one of my own previous answers, I often include my own last name, which fortunately is relatively unique. Or Q&As I frequently link, Chrome url-bar autocomplete does the job, so I can control-a control-c to copy the URL without even having to search. – Peter Cordes Feb 1 at 19:25
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    There's a specific VTC reason you can select for questions that are "too localized" or "unlikely to be useful to anyone except the asker" - There is? I thought SO removed that close reason a while ago. Can you point out which current close reason you mean? – Peter Cordes Feb 1 at 19:26
  • @PeterCordes - Currently it's under "Community Specific", there's a sub-reason for "caused by a typo" or similarly not useful to other people. – bta Feb 2 at 1:03
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    That reason is more specific (to trivial / brain-fart questions typically actually solved in comments), not for cases like you're talking about where the question is not general enough but still complex. If it's a specific application of a general principle, close as a duplicate of the general question, but otherwise I think we just have to downvote. – Peter Cordes Feb 2 at 2:54
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Yes, answers are precious resources. However, the site isn’t designed to treat them this way. Answers are just a chore one has to do to get the truly valuable resource — the reputation points.

I would prefer to have a handful of easily searchable answers that are well-written and perfected by the community. But I feel that a lot of people just find it easier to answer the same questions over and over again instead of finding the correct existing answer. This is a problem that will only get worse and will lead to the eventual demise of Stack Overflow.

Another issue is that old contributors retire and new ones come along not knowing about the existence of previous answers. They see an interesting question and they share their knowledge. We can’t penalize them for this. They want to do good, but the current design nudges them towards making an even bigger mess.

The most important thing is to remember that Stack Overflow is not a personal help desk. We should not answer every question that comes along with a new answer. If the same question has been answered before then close it as a duplicate. People will keep on asking the same questions, but we don’t have to answer them by posting a new answer. If you can come up with a more up-to-date answer then close as a duplicate and add your answer to the duplicate target.


Some questions do not deserve to be closed (with non-duplicate reason). There might be no reason that applies to them and it might be possible to add a new answer. However, they are often too localized. It’s not easy to judge if someone else will encounter the same problem in the future and if the very localized question will be useful to at least one more person. This doesn’t mean that we shouldn't try to clean up such questions to the best of our ability. If we can close it as a duplicate of a less localized question and then delete it, we might actually improve the quality of the site. Gold-badge holders are responsible for evaluating a question. Whenever possible an edit should be enough to keep the question alive, but in many situations, it might be a better choice to find the right duplicate target and delete the question.

The less time we spent on writing new answers the more time we can spend on closing existing questions and editing the answers that we currently have. In the long run, this will be more valuable than new answers, but for this to work, one has to be motivated by the desire to share knowledge rather than reputation points.

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    "Answers are just a chore one has to do to get the truly valuable resource — the reputation points." Answers aren't a chore, and the reputation isn't a "resource". If you really feel that answering is a chore then Stack Overflow isn't the right site to be contributing answers on; you can't trade in your reputation for real life money or personal effects. They are nothing more than to show others what privileges you have. They don't really even show how well you've contributed, as there are plenty of people with 200+ score questions that are LQ. – Larnu Jan 29 at 17:55
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    "Another issue is that old contributors retire and new ones come along not knowing about the existence of previous answers." There are at least a few of "old veterans" that haven't learned what the "close as duplicate" feature is yet too. New user or old, there are plenty that are just as "guilty". Most of the time, anyone proficient with a Search Engine would be able to find a duplicate question to a common, but well written, question. – Larnu Jan 29 at 17:56
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    @Larnu I wouldn't be able to close or delete posts if I haven't spent enough time answering questions. It's not easy to find an answerable question and when you do it can probably be closed as a duplicate. Earning the reputation I needed to keep this site clean could only be done by answering posts. – Dharman Jan 29 at 17:58
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    @Larnu I'm going to agree with Dharman here. Let's say that I only cared about curating the site. I could do that much more effectively if I had more reputation. The only way to get that reputation is by answering (and asking of course, but I assume you're not making a distinction here in this regard). Given that, reputation is a resource, and answering would be somewhat of a chore to get that resource, and I don't think there's anything wrong with that. Nothing wrong with the user I mean; I can certainly see the argument that this is a problem with the rep based system. – cigien Jan 29 at 18:03
  • You can still flag a question if it's a duplicate question @Dharman . Like I said, reputation = privileges. Nothing more. You have the privilege to vote to close due to your reputation, but that doesn't make reputation a "resource". – Larnu Jan 29 at 18:03
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    @Larnu I constantly spend all my reputation points on downvoting other answers. To retain my privileges which I use to close and delete other questions I need to keep earning reputation points. Otherwise, I will lose my privileges and I will not be able to do any more useful work. – Dharman Jan 29 at 18:07
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    @Dharman If you downvote questions instead then it is more likely that they will not be answered in the first place. And question downvotes are free. That aside, you should probably be very close (at 20k rep and 3/4 of the way to 1,000 answers) to the inflection point where passive rep gain outweighs downvotes. And at 20k you can start delete voting those answers and getting that rep back, too. – TylerH Jan 29 at 22:13
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    "If you downvote questions instead then it is more likely that they will not be answered in the first place." In my years of volunteerism in the SE network, I have seen zero evidence that downvotes on a question will magically prevent a question from being answered. @TylerH – mickmackusa Jan 30 at 21:26
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    "new [users] come along not knowing about the existence of previous answers" ...this is why I think we should only allow folks to answer questions after they have proven themselves to correctly identify good, unique, on-topic questions. Time to take steps to combat SO's imminent doom. – mickmackusa Jan 30 at 21:33
  • @mickmackusa yeah, I hear you, good, unique, on-topic questions, absolutely, but to support that with a question that has 20 downvotes...? – berend Feb 1 at 8:39
  • @berend of course, I disagree with the downvotes on my question. I think my recommendation was vilified by snap judgements. I found myself re-clarifying in comments why my recommendation was not unfair. In time, I hope people will change their mind when they realize how rampant the problem is. If downvoters didn't like my initial algorithm, I am open to modification of the rules. I believe it is an awesome idea because it completely ignores the rep metric, holds everyone to the same standard, and increases everyone's awareness to the fact that we are trying to build a resource. – mickmackusa Feb 1 at 9:01
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    @mickmackusa questions with a negative score are greyed out on the home page and send a signal to readers it's a bad question. Once a question reaches -4 it drops off the home page entirely. Negatively scored questions also contribute to the automatic system checker (Roomba) that deletes questions. So there is plenty of evidence that it prevents a question from being answered, but it's not magic; it's a process. – TylerH Feb 1 at 15:56
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    @TylerH I never, ever use the home page while I am volunteering -- it is so full of questions that are out of my range of expertise that it is not worth the scrolling. For that reason, I never see any >-4 questions removed from the list that I watch every day. imgur.com/a/8kAexta And I have seen plenty of negatively voted questions get answered. – mickmackusa Feb 1 at 22:33
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I can relate, back in 2014 or so I felt encouraged by the reputation system to answer everything I could.

Now I saw why the Chef community has fought against this format, out of a few, a bunch of my answers are outdated and maintaining them with each yearly major release would be a nightmare.

So nowadays when I give a look at my usual tags, I don't interact much unless the question is a generic principle needing a bit of "use case" for it, the documentation doesn't cover it and is not accepting proposals.

All in all, dropping an answer on each question I could is counter productive toward something helpfull, and starting to learn vue.js actually I'm a bit back on SO from search to just be disapointed most of the time because it seems those feeling answers are precious are overwhelmed by people like me in 2014.

There's probably something to do as education there, but well, that begs the question of the initial input which is the question and despite the efforts made it doesn't seems to have improved enough in my humble point of view.

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Unlike precious resources, answers are free and limitless. You can post whatever you want without restraint - they can only cost a couple of imaginary rep points after all. But, long after you are dead and humans have been replaced by AI machines, your answers will still live on in some archive, which in a way, means that a part of you from that moment will live on forever. So make your imprint on the universe! Fear not and smash away at the "Post Your Answer" button.

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    eh, no, answers require time, which is far more precious than an answer appearing on a Q&A site. – Kevin B Feb 10 at 23:20
  • @Kevin B Let's be honest. If you cared about time, you wouldn't be doing this right now... – pkr Feb 10 at 23:21
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    eh, again, no, me caring about how this network is curated, ideally such that contributions can still be made, at less of a cost of wasted time wading through garbage, is most certainly not an indication that i don't care about time. – Kevin B Feb 10 at 23:24
  • So because what we leave behind might stay forever - we should say bugrit and make that lasting impression one of heaps of rushed garbage? Assuming that somehow what people write lives on forever seems like a reason to put in more care, not less. – MisterMiyagi Feb 11 at 6:50
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I seldom bother writing "good" answers anymore. As other answers have noted, it's a question of whether it's worth my time. But the reasons I feel it's not are different from those mentioned.

I'm conscious that when I volunteer my time to write an answer, I'm contributing to a collective project. I no longer have any faith in the custodianship of that project. I disagree with the attitudes of both the company that owns this site and those of the volunteer moderators who are themselves often at odds with the company. I consider the company's radical social agenda to be extremely harmful, and I consider "the community" to be a bunch of bullies who drove off nearly everyone with differing opinions about what content is valuable and how this site should be operated. Most pertinent to your question, I consider the idea that new content must be unique to be valuable fundamentally incompatible with the company's goal of attracting new users and getting them engaged.

Therefore, my version of being "welcoming" is to put myself in the mind of a brand new programmer and answer questions that show the level of thought and research effort that I would expect from someone struggling with new concepts, not the higher standard that I would hold an experienced developer to. In other words, I treat the site as a help desk. The market cries out for this service, and it's a failure of imagination that this site isn't designed to provide it. Content with long-term value can still be curated, just in an entirely different way. And when it is, here or on a competing site, I'll start contributing it again.

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    So because the site isn't doing a good job of curation, you are taking actions that actively work against that goal? No matter how outrageous the behavior of the custodians has been (and you aren't wrong), it does not entitle you to help flood the site with write-my-code-for-me helpdesk Q&A. Just because a helpdesk is in demand does not make the StackOverflow Q&A model suitable for providing one. – Ben Voigt Feb 1 at 1:47
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    "The market cries out for this service, and it's a failure of imagination that this site isn't designed to provide it." - Well, why don't you use your imagination and start one? – Stephen C Feb 1 at 4:22
  • @BenVoigt My actions do not create any problem for the way the site should be curated. You SO your way, I'll SO mine. – Kevin Krumwiede Feb 1 at 5:07
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    Hint: imagination is fine, but there is no viable business (or social) model for a building a free IT help desk service. – Stephen C Feb 1 at 6:05
  • @StephenC I and the multitude like me who have been driven off this site are living proof that you're wrong. – Kevin Krumwiede Feb 1 at 19:22
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    OK. But where is the multitude of people who will answer an endless stream of helpdesk questions for free? What is the payoff? And ... again ... if you feel such a site should exist and will work, start it. – Stephen C Feb 3 at 23:21
  • @StephenC Look how many closed "help desk" questions have answers. Hint: most of them. And I am starting it. Here. – Kevin Krumwiede Feb 4 at 1:04
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    Good for you. So what is your answer saying? That it is OK to write answers to "helpdesk" type questions? I would agree with that, though some wouldn't. Or that it is OK to write poor answers (or unhelpful answers) to "helpdesk" type questions? I disagree with that. – Stephen C Feb 4 at 1:11
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    But really the Q&A model and the Helpdesk model are different. In the former, you need the person asking the question to ask an intelligible question, and provide the required info up front. Otherwise things get messy (and "unfriendly" ... 'cos people object to being asked to clarify.) In the HelpDesk model, you (ideally) have a one-on-one dialog between a user and an agent. And the agent patiently hand-holds the user through the process of diagnosing and solving the problem. The problem is that you need a one-on-one relationship. – Stephen C Feb 4 at 1:13
  • @StephenC I'm saying that not only is it okay to write answers to help desk questions, but that for myself and probably many others, these are the only answers that are worth writing anymore. Most help desk questions end up being closed as duplicates. "Unclear" is one of the most misused close reasons. I've seen a great many unique, interesting, and perfectly clear Q&As closed as unclear. That's one of the major reasons I don't bother writing high quality answers to them anymore. – Kevin Krumwiede Feb 4 at 1:15
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    Well yes. What you are seeing is the effect of trying to use a Q&A site as a Helpdesk. What you actually need to do is to start a SEPARATE helpdesk site. Don't complain ... act. For example, you could start a new Area 52 proposal. I don't know how that would go down with SE management, but I for one would be happy for it to take off, and succeed, and the "poor" questions could all be redirected there for the happy help desk people to answer (until their fingers drop off :-) ) – Stephen C Feb 4 at 1:19
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    I'm sure "they" recognize the need. I expect they also realize that recognizing the need doesn't mean that >they< can fulfill it. Like I said ... stop putting this on "them". Act, don't complain. – Stephen C Feb 4 at 1:26
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    Really? "I'm contributing to a collective project. I no longer have any faith in the custodianship of that project. I disagree with the attitudes of both the company that owns this site and those of the volunteer moderators who are themselves often at odds with the company." etcetera. – Stephen C Feb 4 at 1:48
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    What I mean by acting is set up a separate free IT helpdesk site that operates the way that you think it should. Rather than complaining about the StackOverflow status quo. Your "acting" by trying to persuade the community is doomed to failure. Sorry, but that should be obvious, – Stephen C Feb 4 at 1:50
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    I guess many people would not disagree that a helpdesk style format has merit. The problem is that Stack Overflow does not have a helpdesk style format! If you try to force a helpdesk into it, there will be a lot of wasted effort - both new and old - for no reason other than forcing this on a place already occupied. So do not wonder if people who would actually like both a helpdesk and Q&A format will sternly oppose your intrusion. – MisterMiyagi Feb 4 at 6:56

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