-27

I saw this edit which I suggested to the tag . A bit of context: this tag refers to the tkinter.Button class and can be used to add a button to a parent widget.

I've been using tkinter for 5 years and have made a few games and applications with it. I'm not an expert, but it's fair to say that I know what I am talking about when I talk about tkinter.

This is the text I added to the tag wiki:

The Button widget is a standard Tkinter widget used to implement various kinds of buttons. Buttons can contain text or images, and you can associate a Python function or method with each button. When the button is pressed, Tkinter automatically calls that function or method.

Now that was a month ago and looking back I maybe could have worded it better, but my main confusion lies in why it was rejected for plagiarism. Just to double check I even did a google search and a search on Stack Overflow to see if maybe it was quoted elsewhere by accident, and it was not.

The closest thing I was able to find was this, which is not only a broken link but also according to google's summary of the webpage not an exact copy.

So why was the suggested edit rejected?

10
  • 1
    The first line is almost verbatim copied from python-course.eu/tkinter_buttons.php – Nick Jan 21 at 6:08
  • @Nick yes, but it wasn't my intention to blatantly copy off like that. And if it was, I would have linked the website as that edit was a month ago. – 10 Rep Jan 21 at 6:10
  • 4
    I didn't review it, I'm just saying that the very first line, the first thing people will read, being almost word for word the same as an online source will push people towards the plagiarism rejection reason. First impressions and all that – Nick Jan 21 at 6:12
  • 7
    Weird, Nick found one site where the first sentence is similar and I found one where the whole paragraph is identical to the one from an external source: xspdf.com/resolution/53078349.html (Topic "Tkinter button python 3"; second paragraph). No matter what your "intention" was, your text is not written by you, so it is correctly declined as plagiarism. – Tom Jan 21 at 6:19
  • 7
    So, when you say "I maybe could have worded it better" ... do you suggest you originally wrote that text and someone else plagiarized it from you? – Tom Jan 21 at 6:22
  • 5
    A quick Google search for each sentence results in several pages with the exact text. That's unequivocally plagiarism. Searches: "The Button widget is a standard Tkinter widget used to implement various kinds of buttons. Buttons can contain text or images, and you can associate a Python function or method with each button. [cont] – Makyen Jan 21 at 6:28
  • 4
  • 1
    Since the link in my first comment looks like a scrapper result, I've digged a bit further and like Makyen found several sites all using the same text, like this, this and this, but since the scrapper has a bit more text there, they all don't look like the original source. Anyway, the old tag description was already plagiarized from the original tag creator, but no one noticed/checked that. – Tom Jan 21 at 6:40
  • 4
    While I didn't take the time to try to track down the actual original place from which most of those sites copied, there are some in the search results which show dates substantially prior to your suggested edit. Are you claiming that you are the original author who posted it somewhere else from which all those sites copied? That's a fairly extraordinary claim, which requires evidence to be believed. It's definitely not something that reviewers would be looking for, certainly not with no such claim being mentioned in the edit comment (or in your question here). – Makyen Jan 21 at 6:40
  • 1
    “Now that was a month ago and looking back I maybe could have worded it better, but my main confusion lies in why it was rejected for plagiarism.” - As others have said the test was indeed copied verbatim from a website. Just because the old tag description was plagiarized doesn’t mean the new description can be plagiarized. Searching for a whole sentence is fairly common practice when approving tag descriptions. – Security Hound Jan 21 at 12:34
16

It appears verbatim on page 637 of Comp-Computer Science-TB-12 by Reeta and Gagan Sahoo. It also appears in many other places on the Internet, as Makyen said, including this website.

Even if this is your original work that everyone else copied (not that this claim is believable to me in the slightest), the reviewers were wholly justified in rejecting this on the grounds that it appears to be plagiarized from external sources.

When doing a Google search to find exact text, it helps to wrap it in quotation marks; e.g.:
https://www.google.com/search?q=%22The+Button+widget+is+a+standard+Tkinter+widget+used+to+implement+various+kinds+of+buttons.+Buttons+can+contain+text+or+images%2C+and+you+can+associate+a+Python+function+or+method+with+each+button.+When+the+button+is+pressed%2C+Tkinter+automatically+calls+that+function+or+method.%22

2
  • Ah, I see. I find it highly unlikely I would have plagiriazed it (at least on purpose) as I am a student who goes to school and I know the dangers of plagiarism. However it is copied word for word so that makes sense. – 10 Rep Jan 21 at 16:02
  • 5
    Right; I would have expected you to know better, which is why I find this somewhat confusing. But from the reviewers' perspective, it's not hard to understand what happened and why. – Cody Gray Jan 21 at 19:12

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .