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I've just come across a debugging question which was judged to be lacking in debugging details and closed. (I'm not convinced that was the right decision, but that is not relevant to my point.)

After the question was closed, a high reputation user edited the code in the question to correct it, thereby answering the question.

I've not noticed this before, and I couldn't find a meta question about it.


Question: Is this kosher?

Pro: This is helping the OP, and they did appreciate it.

Mitigation: It would have been difficult to answer clearly in a comment.

Con: This is borderline vandalism. And we tell newbies not to put their answers into their own questions, etc. So this is setting a bad example.

Meh: The question is probably destined to be deleted.

Con: But what if it gets reopened?


Question: Does this warrant rolling back the offending edits?


Question: Does this warrant flagging for a moderator to intervene?

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  • 2
    (My answers would be no, yes and no, but I want to canvas opinions.)
    – Stephen C
    Jan 19 at 6:00
  • 18
    Pro: This is helping the OP, and they did appreciate it. --> this a Con for me because we are not helping the OP but encouraging him to keep posting the same bad question. Jan 19 at 7:52
  • 18
    on the blue banner on a closed question you see "It is not currently accepting answers. ", so the editor tries to circumvent this. Not OK.
    – jps
    Jan 19 at 8:00
  • 3
    -1 because there are already hundreds of meta questions and help documents that make it clear that edits are not supposed to address the question.
    – idmean
    Jan 19 at 9:43
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    "If you make the primary purpose "helping people" (with the implicit "at all costs" that goes along with it), and let "build a repository" be the secondary purpose, the secondary purpose is going to get forgotten and SO will devolve into a shitty Experts Exchange clone..." (What is Stack Overflow’s goal?)
    – gnat
    Jan 19 at 10:15
  • 2
    Where do you get "primary purpose" from this scenario? Jan 19 at 11:05
  • 3
    It is a pretty sad state of affairs if we turn helping people who ask questions into a disadvantage. As one of the answers says: "First, let's acknowledge that the editor's intent is a worthy one: They wanted to help the OP. That's great and that spirit of helpfulness rather than gatekeeping is something we want to foster. The means by which they did that may have been misguided, but the impulse to help is good." That is what >>I<< mean by a Pro.
    – Stephen C
    Jan 19 at 11:15
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    turn helping people who ask questions into a disadvantage - I don't see any disadvantage for anyone here. Questions are closed for a reason (in this example it was "needs debugging details"), so why can't the "high rep user" wait until the missing info in provided, vote to reopen when everything is there and then answer. When the answer is already provided before the OP edited the question to fix the problems, all motivation to fix it afterwards is lost. That's a disadvantage, also for the OP, because he looses the chance to get maybe an even better answer from someone else.
    – jps
    Jan 19 at 13:40
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    Because ... the chances are that one of 1) the info won't be provided ('cos the OP doesn't get it), 2) the reopen vote fails, 3) the person who could have provided the answer loses interest, or 4) the process takes so long that the OP gives up. The example I was looking was a beginner programmers question and the (un-)answer was all that was needed. The the OP >was< helped. The hypothetical reopening was neither necessary or warranted. The vast majority of Questions that are asked on StackOverflow these days are of no use to anyone but the OP. They come here for help. Lets help them.
    – Stephen C
    Jan 19 at 13:59
  • not helpful to anyone but the OP - yes, that's the reality. I was considering more interesting questions when I wrote the comment. The depressing reality is, that many OPs don't even react on comments that ask for clarification, but then I also don't feel urged to help. Too many question look like "thrown over the fence", in the hope to pickup an answer the next day (when the problem even still persists and they didn't figure out the solution already.
    – jps
    Jan 19 at 14:02
  • 2
    That's OK. But lets not call it a "disadvantage" that someone is helped.
    – Stephen C
    Jan 19 at 14:06
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    I'm afraid you have to choose, because you can't please everyone. Giving advantage to askers of inappropriate questions puts folks like me at disadvantage, "I want Stack Overflow to keep helping people like me - those who get their answers here after dumping their question into google search box... I don't want my search results polluted with useless solutions to homework dumps. I don't want it to be flooded with thousand answers to single simple question about NPE / NRE..."
    – gnat
    Jan 19 at 17:13
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    It changes nothing that the question is closed. Answers still don't belong in questions, and users still don't belong in rollback wars.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jan 19 at 19:30
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No, there is no circumstance in which it is acceptable to edit a question in order to add an answer to it. Editing the OP's code such that it fixes the original problem completely changes the intent of the question, and this is strictly not allowed.

The fact that the question happens to be closed is irrelevant; an answer is not supposed to be added to the question in any form. If the editor's desire is to help the OP solve their problem, they can attempt to do so in a comment, or even in multiple comments. If the help can't be provided in comments for whatever reason, that is unfortunate, but it still doesn't mean an answer can be edited into a question.

Such an edit absolutely warrants a rollback. If the question is edited again to answer the question, you can rollback a second time. At this point, a moderator flag will be raised automatically, and the issue will eventually be investigated by a moderator. You can continue to rollback such edits if you want, but I would suggest leaving a comment addressed to the editor and then stepping back from the situation. If a user is not willing to follow the rules even under advisement, it's usually better to let it be handled by a moderator.

If you feel that a custom moderator flag is warranted at any point, go ahead and raise one. If you see a pattern of such edits, where a user is repeatedly adding answers to questions, definitely raise a custom flag in that case, since a flag won't be raised automatically in such a situation.

In general, if you see something, say something: This is done by raising a custom moderator flag. Try and explain the issue that you've noticed as clearly and precisely as possible, and provide all the context that you think might be necessary in order for the situation to be evaluated. In the worst case, the flag will be declined, which is not a big deal at all.

I understand that there are some users who are hesitant to raise flags that might be declined, as that's seen as a penalty, or a punishment. This is not really the case. A declined flag simply means that the moderator who handled the flag disagreed with your assessment of that particular situation. It's always better to err on the side of raising a flag even if it might be declined, as opposed to not raising a flag about an issue that needs to be addressed.

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  • 1
    At this point, a moderator flag will be raised automatically, - really? Didn't know that.
    – jps
    Jan 19 at 11:04
  • 1
    @jps Yes, "Two rollbacks from the same user on a single post over a reasonably close period of time will automatically generate the "rollback war" flag" as explained here. The situation the OP is describing would definitely be considered reasonably close.
    – cigien
    Jan 19 at 11:22
  • 3
    Well, rather refrain from doing rollbacks once the OP stubbornly decided to override your first rollback. At that point I'd rather raise a custom moderator flag explaining why the edit shouldn't be and then back off. "Rollback wars" are frowned upon and these kind of situations are always best handled by a moderator. Mods are often even sensible enough to let one among them with domain knowledge handle the flag.
    – Lundin
    Jan 19 at 15:16
  • @Lundin Sure, that would be a reasonable approach. Personally, I don't assume that the OP is being stubborn just because of a single rollback after I rollback. Perhaps they thought my first rollback was in error. I like to leave a comment explaining why I'm rolling back, if I haven't done so already, then immediately rollback a second time. After that I disengage, unless of course they write a comment that appears to be sincerely looking for feedback.
    – cigien
    Jan 21 at 14:46
  • @cigien We should always leave a comment before doing a rollback. Too bad the edit UI doesn't allow comments for rollbacks in itself.
    – Lundin
    Jan 21 at 14:52
  • @Lundin Sometimes I get distracted, or decide that a comment is not necessary. In the case of the OP adding an answer I would definitely leave a comment, but there are other cases where I have neglected doing so. You're right, I should make sure that I always leave a comment for any kind of rollback, thanks for pointing that out. And yeah, being able to add a comment as part of the rollback itself would be great, it would make that much more convenient.
    – cigien
    Jan 21 at 15:01
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First, let's acknowledge that the editor's intent is a worthy one: They wanted to help the OP. That's great and that spirit of helpfulness rather than gatekeeping is something we want to foster. The means by which they did that may have been misguided, but the impulse to help is good.

A couple of things it's probably worth reminding ourselves of:

  • The goal of SO is to be a repository of high-quality questions and answers that are useful to other people in the future, not only useful to the person posting the question.

  • The reason for closing questions is that they don't support that goal.

  • That doesn't mean that helping the person posting the question anyway isn't worthwhile, just that it's secondary to the main purpose of SO.

With that in mind:

Question: Is this kosher?

No. The question box is for questions; answers go in answer boxes. A closed question is explicitly designed to not accept answers. So editing an answer into the question, even when well-meaning, isn't okay.

Question: Does this warrant rolling back the offending edits?

Yes, but I'd leave a comment for the OP along these lines:

@whoever, I've rolled back the edit that put an answer to your question into the question text itself. The question box isn't where answers go here on SO. But you can see that answer [here] in the revision history.

That way, the question is just a question, but the person that answer is aimed at knows where to find the answer in the short term, and gets the help the person editing the answer in was trying to provide.

If you have the expertise to know whether the answer really answers the question, and the question is otherwise on-topic, you might also consider voting to reopen.

Question: Does this warrant flagging for a moderator to intervene?

No. But if the person posting the answer-in-question edits it back in (rollback or otherwise), and you remove it again with an explanation in a comment why you've done that, and they put it back, flag for moderator attention and walk away. Don't get into an edit war or protracted argument in the comments.


FWIW: When I've really wanted to answer a closed question in the past and the answer was beyond what I could do in a comment, I've explained as much as I could in a comment or comments and then put the rest in pastebin or similar with a link. Yes, this means that content is off-site, which is also not kosher in the normal course of things, but the question is closed; the main goal is already not being achieved. So the comments (which are ephemeral) and link (which may rot) are just for the OP now, to help that specific person, not an enduring solution for others in the future.

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  • 3
    Establishing the "see answer in history" method seems a dangerous path to me. Questions get closed for a reason (otherwise they should be reopened). It is the wrong lesson to teach that "You can ask a close-worthy question, get it closed and will still get great answers in a weird complicated way." If that is learned by too many people (being a pessimistic doomseer here...), then we get lots of off-topic questions, which create work and degrade the quality of the Q/A collection.
    – Yunnosch
    Jan 19 at 10:40
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    @Yunnosch - I don't see it happening often enough for the doom scenario to play out. Anything like this gets washed out by the constant stream of zero-research, zero-searching questions... :-) Besides, the damage is already done: The answer edited into the question. Once that's there, we're into mitigation... Jan 19 at 10:43
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    I am imagining editing an answer into the question, rolling it back and commenting "see history" done by one person.... But you are right in the proportion of things, "do my homework" and "how can I solder wires together" will probably drown out the "I have found a good solution for your closed problem". If my one-person scenario pops up anywhere I will mod-flag quickly.
    – Yunnosch
    Jan 19 at 10:48
  • @Yunnosch - Yeah, to me that would be a fairly clear (minor) abuse of platform. :-) (I can imagine someone saying "But is it really worse than off-site links in this situation?" My answer is: Yeah, I think so, but I can see raising that question. Hopefully at this point we're into the tall trees...) Jan 19 at 11:32
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    Answered like a true moderator. ;) I like the opening statement and overall tone of this answer, even though in the end, it seems there is an extremely high degree of consensus on "no, yes, no" for the top-level questions posed by OP.
    – John Y
    Jan 19 at 17:47

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