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When I look at the feed of questions that I'm given, on almost all of them I think something like "I know nothing about that" or else "Figuring this out would take me so much effort that by the time I answer it, someone else will have already also answered it with what I'm going to write"

I also look at some of answers given and think, how do you understand this much about this super specific thing. I'm just wondering if I'll ever understand certain topics to the extent that I would be able to give answers like that. Are the people giving these answers someone who has worked in this field for 20 years? Or are they people just like me who are at their first industry job out of university?

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    Most of my answers were posted before I was ever employed as a programmer. And I have no formal training as a programmer. But I might be weird. :-) – Cody Gray Jan 3 at 4:33
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    Even in the first industry job you may already have an encountered (and solved) something that you are in a unique position to answer. – Peter Mortensen Jan 3 at 5:30
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    Have been writing small programs as a hobby for two years. I'm a literature graduate and of course, unemployed. – oguz ismail Jan 3 at 5:57
  • @oguzismail I'm a web developer and feel like degrees are kind of overrated. I feel like if you did this scrimba course and made a good looking website for a small business,that you'd look a lot more hireable than someone who just has a comp sci degree. I'm not on commission from that website, I just like them. – Sam Jan 3 at 6:03
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    Do you have ignored tags or are you basically getting all stuff in your feed? – rene Jan 3 at 7:20
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    Yes. If all you want to do is website design, a degree is probably overrated. And yes, a CS degree doesn't give you experience. – Stephen C Jan 3 at 7:31
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    Seconding @rene: set up your own list of 'watched tags' and 'ignored tags'. This is the only way to stay sane and focused when reading the feed, it will only be a constantly distracting jumble of esoteric in languages, packages and use-cases that you'll never need. (and revisit and prune your tags regularly). Also, let your self-esteem in programming be guided by whether you're gradually learning how to solve your own problems, not how smart other people seem to sound. Often, ignoring 99.9% of the background noise and cutting out distractions is the best way to get the job done. – smci Jan 3 at 8:27
  • You most certainly will never understand certain topics. Stack Overflow has 14 million users now; you will never acquire the sum of their knowledge. You can get to be the best expert in a few selected topics though, with some experience. – anatolyg Jan 3 at 11:20
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    @Sam - Degrees probably are overrated if we mistake them for some kind of vocational training. But they were intended as academic undertakings and (until about twenty years ago?) they were. In a hyper-mercantile society it's difficult not to see everything through a transactional frame. I don't regret studying (amongst other things) Middle High German Literature, Soviet Foreign Policy, Proto-Indo-European, post WWII German Cinema and early 20th century Spanish history at university in the 1990s, though I might do, if I'd expected that to be my job training. – Rounin Jan 3 at 11:29
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    How I learned is by keeping tabs on all of these topics that I didn't have knowledge on. I would then take the time to learn it extensively, then next time someone has a question on a similar topic, I am able to answer the questions. Get the knowledge first. Worry about answering later. Learn for your own sake. Help others while you're at it. – Paul Samsotha Jan 3 at 18:03
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Figuring this out would take me so much effort that by the time I answer it, someone else will have already also answered it with what I'm going to write

Indeed, that is possible. But by the time you have figured out how to answer the question, you've learned something about your technology of choice (of course you're looking to answer questions in one or a few specific tags for technologies you work with or want to work with).

Answering questions you don't directly know the answer to is a great way to learn. Certainly beats taking a course!

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    Re: "Answering questions you don't directly know the answer to is a great way to learn. Certainly beats taking a course!" I learned lots of PHP (2012-14) by reading answers on SO. I learned lots more JS (2015-18) by tasking myself with giving good, comprehensive answers to questions I didn't initially know the answers to. – Rounin Jan 3 at 11:35
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According to the 2020 Developer Survey 47% of all respondents learned to code less than 10 years ago. (In 2019 it was 49.5%.) The surveys also have numbers for just the people who are professional developers and percentages for education level. The numbers may be different for the site as a whole: the site has millions of users and not all of the 65,000 respondents necessarily have Stack Overflow accounts, but they're the only numbers available.

A couple of other things I think are worth noting:

I also look at some of answers given and think, how do you understand this much about this super specific thing.

Aside from Peter Mortensen's excellent point that sometimes people are very knowledgeable about something because they had the same problem, some of the users here work directly on the technologies people have questions about. It's not unusual to see that someone works for the company responsible for X or that someone's a maintainer for a library.

I would also suggest that you look at the post date and edit history of such answers. There's a good chance the answer wasn't the first one posted or it only became a great answer after subsequent edits.

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What level of experience do most answerers have?

I don't think this question is objectively answerable ...

Some people who answer questions here have many years of professional programming experience. Others have minimal experience. And all points in between.

An objectively quantified answer would entail correlating StackOverflow survey responses with user activity information. The base information should not be available to anyone here ... except maybe to a small number of SE employees. (And that assumes it wasn't immediately anonymized.)

But it doesn't matter. You don't have to answer if you don't want to, and conversely there is nothing stopping you answering if you do want to.

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