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Earlier today I asked a question on Stack Overflow based on a problem I faced on LeetCode.

Three issues:

  1. First, a user ranted saying how "these contest/challenge/competitive coding/hacking sites" are useless. He even downvoted the question, setting a precedent for rest of the question viewers. The issue is, he never tried to understand what I (as an OP) wanted. Like I commented below it, I am not particularly learning C++, but algorithms. And perhaps without reading the question at all, he thought that I am complaining about slow code (while I am not).
  2. The second user then said that the problem is not minimally reproducible. I have pasted the entire function - that is all that is required to understand what I am trying to do. I could've posted the main() function, but really, would that keep things minimal? The problem is in the posted function - not in main(). Anyway, that is not the issue - the issue is 'trolling'. He copy-pasted it and complained that it is not 'minimally reproducible' since it is not 'runnable' - I am afraid Stack Overflow must clarify that 'minimally reproducible' also means 'runnable' (I cannot see it there in the description). Is such trolling expected?
  3. Then, I pasted two links from the second user's profile saying that they aren't runnable either and in all fairness, asked him to downvote and comment on them too. Needless to say, he didn't. Last, I flagged the trolling comment of his. Interestingly, my comment was removed by the moderator - not the earlier troll. So, is it acceptable to promote such trolling content?

Does this behavior really count as 'welcoming' to other users? To me it feels more like 'trolling'.

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    First, a user ranted saying how "these contest/challenge/competitive coding/hacking sites" are useless. He even downvoted the question How do you know that? – ppwater Jan 2 at 3:02
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    Umedh was the code you pasted runnable directly? Like, if I just copy and paste it into a text editor (and add the relevant boilerplate/libraries etc) and hit run; would your code run fine? – Yatin Jan 2 at 3:10
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    @ppwater, I had a comment there asking me to explain the downvote reason. That is when the user commented. – user8305079 Jan 2 at 3:11
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    @UmedhSinghBundela Ah, okay. And minimally reproducible means If the code is copy-pasted, it should repro the same problem you mentioned, not other problems. – ppwater Jan 2 at 3:12
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  • @Yatin, yes, it does (gives a wrong answer, which is what my question is about). – user8305079 Jan 2 at 3:15
  • @ppwater, it produces the exact same problem. Not any other problem. Besides, I am curious to understand what is there to even discuss about this being non-reproducible. For instance, this question with an upvote is not 'runnable' as is - is it? I have pasted the exact function that has the problem - what else does anyone even expect to make in reproducible? Is that expectation even valid? – user8305079 Jan 2 at 3:18
  • @Yatin, thanks, but my question is not about downvoting. My question is about trolling and knowing when it is applicable (as can be seen it was 'ok' in this case, based not just on the second user, but also the moderator's actions). – user8305079 Jan 2 at 3:20
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    Well, anyway, I have been here on SO for long and one question that I always saw was around how to make the website "friendly" and "welcoming" to other users. I am afraid unless this kind of behavior is addressed, things wouldn't change. ¯_(ツ)_/¯ Based on current behavior, trolling is in fact encouraged (at least that is what it feels like to the OP). – user8305079 Jan 2 at 3:28
  • @UmedhSinghBundela You must say This program gives an error. How can I fix it – ppwater Jan 2 at 3:50
  • Not This program is not working well. (But the program gives an error except that) – ppwater Jan 2 at 3:50
  • That means you have to declair You have a error in your code – ppwater Jan 2 at 3:52
  • @ppwater - that error is my question!! – user8305079 Jan 2 at 3:53
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    And are you mentioning your error in the question? I don't see it – ppwater Jan 2 at 3:55
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    The true beauty of the Minimal Reproducible Example is it's a powerful debugging technique. It's hard to make a good MRE without finding the problem. You might still be stuck for a solution, but if you know what the problem is, you can make really wickedly targeted questions that often get answered within minutes. That or you have a really neat question that requires a domain expert. My personal opinion: If you ask a help fix code question without already having isolated the error with a MRE, you are asking the question too soon. – user4581301 Jan 2 at 23:36
33

You've raised a lot of points, so there's quite a few things to be discussed here.

First off, you need to stop and appreciate the irony of referring to other users' behavior as "trolling" while simultaneously complaining about "unfriendly" and "unfair" treatment. Dismissing someone else's comments as "trolling" is neither friendly nor fair on your part. A lot of what you're upset about—reasonable or not—doesn't even come close to the level of "trolling". You just found someone on the Internet whom you disagreed with. Welcome to the club.


  1. First, a user ranted saying how "these contest/challenge/competitive coding/hacking sites" are useless. He even downvoted the question, setting a precedent for rest of the question viewers. The issue is, he never tried to understand what I (as an OP) wanted. Like I commented below it, I am not particularly learning C++ but algorithms. And perhaps without reading the question at all he thought that I am complaining about slow code (while I am not).

First, they are pretty useless. That much is objectively true. We see a lot of people who show up here asking questions based on misunderstandings that they've gathered from these types of sites. Maybe you are not one of those people. That's great! But we have no way of knowing that. And so, based on our experience and our generosity, we are attempting to share what we know with you: a word of caution. Please don't take that the wrong way. The comment wasn't a personal attack. They weren't calling you "useless", only these "contest/challenge/competitive coding/hacking sites". It's an important distinction to make. Sam's advice is good, and you should take it to heart, if you don't already know it. (Although it seems you do, which is great, as I said above. In that case, you can simply ignore it; it's not doing any harm.)

For the sake of transparency, in case the comment gets deleted, I've reprinted it here:

What do you hope to learn from these contest/challenge/competitive coding/hacking sites? If it's to learn C++, you won't learn anything there. Like in this case, the correct solution is based on a mathematical or a programming trick. If you don't know what the trick is and attempt to code a brute-force approach, the program either runs slow, or fails to handle an obscure edge case. If you're trying to learn C++, you won't learn anything from meaningless online contest sites but only from a good C++ textbook.
Sam Varshavchik

You go on to say that "he even downvoted the question". You don't know that. You have absolutely no way of knowing that, and you should not make these assumptions. You might think that's what happened, based on the time of seeing the comment and receiving the downvote, but that's just a coincidence. On a site operating at the scale of Stack Overflow, "unlikely" coincidences happen several times per hour. At the time Sam left the comment, your question was on the first page of questions tagged , and we have a lot of users looking at such questions. It's not unlikely that someone downvoted the question while Sam was writing the comment.

But even if Sam did downvote your question—so what? That's what users here are encouraged to do if they think that "[The] question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful" (from the tooltip on the downvote arrow). If Sam thinks that the question is arising from some quirk of these "content/challenge/competitive coding/hacking sites", then that's a good basis on which to declare it "not useful", and thus a reasonable basis on which to downvote the question. Maybe he did; maybe he didn't. You don't know, and I don't know, either. But if he had, it wouldn't really be problematic behavior, certainly nothing to get upset about. We encourage each user to vote on posts as they see fit, based on the quality of the post. Votes aren't about users; they're about content.

You claim that "he never tried to understand what I (as an OP) wanted", but: (A) you have no basis for that assumption, (B) making this assumption makes it clear that you are not assuming good faith, either, which is unfair, and (C) even if he didn't try to understand what you wanted, that's irrelevant. Stack Overflow is not a help desk. The only function that the OP provides is asking the question. From that point on, questions take on a life of their own, serving as a resource for future viewers just as much, if not more so, than the original asker. As I said above, even if you were not suffering from misapprehensions about the utility of these "contest/challenge/competitive coding/hacking sites", then it's still possible that future viewers might be, thus making Sam's comment relevant.

You don't have any basis on which to claim that Sam didn't read the question at all. Yesterday, I read and thought about a question for a good half-hour, but I still left several comments that fundamentally misunderstood the question. Oops. None of us are perfect. I hope that doesn't make me unfriendly or a troll!


  1. Second user then said that the problem is not minimally reproducible. I have pasted the entire function - that is all that is required to understand what I am trying to do. I could've posted the main() function, but really, would that keep things minimal? The problem is in the posted function - not in main(). Anyway, that is not the issue - the issue is 'trolling'. He copy-pasted it and complained that it is not 'minimally reproducible' since it is not 'runnable' - I am afraid Stackoverflow must clarify that 'minimally reproducible' also means 'runnable' (I cannot see it there in the description). Is such trolling expected?

Actually, πάντα ῥεῖ said more than that. What he said was:

@UmedhSinghBundela Please provide us a minimal reproducible example as required, including an appropriate testcase, and your observation when you've been debugging that code line by line. Otherwise it's unlikeley you'll get helped here.
πάντα ῥεῖ

Now, I don't always agree with πάντα ῥεῖ's comments, but I don't see anything objectionable about this one (other than the misspelling of "unlikely"). Note that he didn't just say "you need a minimal reproducible example". He specifically pointed out that you needed to include "an appropriate test case" and your observations from debugging.

And, yes, as is pretty clear from both the name and the corresponding Help Center page, a "minimal, reproducible example" needs to be runnable. How else is it going to reproduce the problem? Note the explanations on that page, including "Don't sacrifice clarity for brevity when creating a minimal example", "Make sure all information necessary to reproduce the problem is included in the question itself", and "Double-check that your example reproduces the problem!" I could go on, quoting additional language from the page and explaining its applicability, but I really think it speaks for itself.

More fundamentally, neither of these comments were "trolling". He claimed, quite reasonably, that you needed to update your question to include the necessary debugging information. You responded that you already provided this. He responded with evidence to the contrary. You're free to disagree with his interpretation, but that doesn't make it trolling. That just means—as I said above—that you disagree with someone on the Internet.

Finally, there's a broader lesson to be learned here. When you're asking for help, it's in your interest to make it as easy as possible for them to help you. That just might mean that you need to put in a little bit more work than is strictly necessary (e.g., to include a main function that the other person could easily figure out how to write themselves). Whether or not you agree it's truly necessary, why do you choose to come out with disagreement when asked to provide it, rather than just updating your question?


  1. Then, I pasted two links from the second users profile saying that they aren't runnable either and in all fairness, asked him to downvote and comment on them too. Needless to say, he didn't. Last I flagged the trolling comment of his. Interestingly, my comment was removed by the moderator - not the earlier troll. So, is it acceptable to promote such trolling content?

Uhh.... You're calling other users trolls, yet your description here sounds an awful lot to me like trolling. You went through the other user's profile and pasted links to irrelevant cases, just to try and "shame" them? Please don't. There's nothing "fair" about this. If nothing else, remember that questions here are evaluated in isolation. Prior actions of users are not relevant.

Furthermore, you shouldn't be discussing downvotes at all. Again, you don't know if πάντα ῥεῖ might have already downvoted those questions, even if he saw fit to answer them. And, whether he had or not, it's not appropriate for you to ask for others to vote in any way on posts, up or down.

You raised a flag on πάντα ῥεῖ's original comment, stating:

The user just copy pasted the code and complains that it is non-reproducible. He himself has answered questions that couldn't be run just by 'copy-paste'. If SO is welcoming then they should flag user

Yes, that flag was declined by a moderator. That's not a reason to delete a comment. I've already explained above, in answer to point #2, why the comment was reasonable and not trolling.

That moderator did, however, delete your initial comment, which said:

Care to explain why -1?

These comments are useless; moderators regularly delete them. Interestingly, you left this comment before Sam Varshavchik left his comment (quoted above), yet you accuse Sam as having been the one who downvoted your question? The logic doesn't track here.

Later, another moderator removed your rude comment, the one where you went through πάντα ῥεῖ's history and dug up irrelevant links, inappropriately asked for downvotes on other people's posts, and attempted to bring the past behavior of users up for discussion. That comment wasn't constructive in any way. Its sole purpose was to humiliate or pick a fight with a specific user.

You steadfastly continue in your obstinance to improve the question by adding a runnable code snippet. I don't know why. Could a C++ programmer write their own? Sure. Should they be expected to do so? Meh. You're the one who wants help.

  • Regarding - You claim that "he never tried to understand what I (as an OP) wanted", but: (A) you have no basis for that assumption - my basis for that are two (liked I commented there): (a) he assumed I am learning C++; (b) he talked about the algo being slow (which I am not). This is why I believe he did not read or apprehend my question. – user8305079 Jan 2 at 4:10
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    You believe that he misunderstood your question and/or made incorrect assumptions about the intent behind the question. That's fair. You might even be right. But it doesn't prove that Sam was trolling, or acting in bad faith, or that he didn't read your question. It's probably a canned comment he leaves on all the questions he sees that look like they come from a coding challenge. Maybe you're different from most programmers who use those challenge sites and ask questions about them. Maybe it was unfair for him to assume you were like them. But it's still useful advice in general. – Cody Gray Jan 2 at 4:12
  • Also to clarify, what I find "trolling" is just copy-pasting my code and running it as is, despite my earlier comment asking him to add main(). Is it not a good idea to avoid pasting boilerplate code, especially when I know where the issue is (in the pasted function)? – user8305079 Jan 2 at 4:16
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    Also, thank you for this detailed answer. Appreciate you spending time and clearing things up. – user8305079 Jan 2 at 4:16
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    I won't tell you that the way you asked the question originally was "wrong". I think the point here is that, when someone asks you to add more information, it makes more sense to just add the information, rather than getting into an argument with them. – Cody Gray Jan 2 at 4:18
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    Nah that was not trolling, that is what providing a MRE means. Your code must be good to go. I just need to yank it from here and dump it there and I should be taken straight to the core issue. – Yatin Jan 2 at 4:18
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1)

First, a user ranted saying how "these contest/challenge/competitive coding/hacking sites" are useless. He even downvoted the question, setting a precedent for rest of the question viewers. The issue is, he never tried to understand what I (as an OP) wanted. Like I commented below it, I am not particularly learning C++ but algorithms. And perhaps without reading the question at all he thought that I am complaining about slow code (while I am not).

This is the "rant":

What do you hope to learn from these contest/challenge/competitive coding/hacking sites? If it's to learn C++, you won't learn anything there. Like in this case, the correct solution is based on a mathematical or a programming trick. If you don't know what the trick is and attempt to code a brute-force approach, the program either runs slow, or fails to handle an obscure edge case. If you're trying to learn C++, you won't learn anything from meaningless online contest sites but only from a good C++ textbook.

This looks like a canned comment to me. A canned comment is a comment that you write in a broad sense so that you can simply paste it wherever you think it is relevant.

Leet code/Hacker Rank/Hacker Earth etc have a bad reputation on SO because new users who ask questions from there generally paste a link to the question with no explanation whatsoever and dump their code and error.

I feel like this canned comment was created for said users. I don't think you deserved it.

I think your response to it was fine:

I am not specifically learning C++, but algorithms. Besides, the accepted solution uses backtracking, too - just that he/she's doing things differently.

Your question is on-topic AFAIK.

2)

This is the output of your code when I compile it:

main.cpp:3:31: error: 'vector' has not been declared
    3 |     bool canPartitionKSubsets(vector<int>& nums, int k) {
      |                               ^~~~~~
main.cpp:3:37: error: expected ',' or '...' before '<' token
    3 |     bool canPartitionKSubsets(vector<int>& nums, int k) {
      |                                     ^
main.cpp:17:20: error: 'vector' has not been declared
   17 |     void backtrack(vector<int>& nums, vector<int>& path, int idx, int& counter, int target,
      |                    ^~~~~~
main.cpp:17:26: error: expected ',' or '...' before '<' token
   17 |     void backtrack(vector<int>& nums, vector<int>& path, int idx, int& counter, int target,
      |                          ^
main.cpp: In member function 'bool Solution::canPartitionKSubsets(int)':
main.cpp:4:33: error: 'nums' was not declared in this scope
    4 |         int totalSum=accumulate(nums.begin(), nums.end(), 0);
      |                                 ^~~~
main.cpp:4:22: error: 'accumulate' was not declared in this scope
    4 |         int totalSum=accumulate(nums.begin(), nums.end(), 0);
      |                      ^~~~~~~~~~
main.cpp:5:21: error: 'k' was not declared in this scope
    5 |         if(totalSum%k!=0) return false;
      |                     ^
main.cpp:7:29: error: 'k' was not declared in this scope
    7 |         int target=totalSum/k;
      |                             ^
main.cpp:8:9: error: 'sort' was not declared in this scope; did you mean 'short'?
    8 |         sort(nums.begin(), nums.end());
      |         ^~~~
      |         short
main.cpp:10:9: error: 'vector' was not declared in this scope
   10 |         vector<int> path;
      |         ^~~~~~
main.cpp:10:16: error: expected primary-expression before 'int'
   10 |         vector<int> path;
      |                ^~~
main.cpp:11:9: error: 'unordered_set' was not declared in this scope
   11 |         unordered_set<int> s;
      |         ^~~~~~~~~~~~~
main.cpp:11:23: error: expected primary-expression before 'int'
   11 |         unordered_set<int> s;
      |                       ^~~
main.cpp:12:25: error: 'path' was not declared in this scope
   12 |         backtrack(nums, path, 0, counter, target,s );
      |                         ^~~~
main.cpp:12:50: error: 's' was not declared in this scope
   12 |         backtrack(nums, path, 0, counter, target,s );
      |                                                  ^
main.cpp: In member function 'void Solution::backtrack(int)':
main.cpp:19:32: error: 'path' was not declared in this scope
   19 |         int currSum=accumulate(path.begin(), path.end(), 0);
      |                                ^~~~
main.cpp:19:21: error: 'accumulate' was not declared in this scope
   19 |         int currSum=accumulate(path.begin(), path.end(), 0);
      |                     ^~~~~~~~~~
main.cpp:20:21: error: 'target' was not declared in this scope
   20 |         if(currSum==target) {
      |                     ^~~~~~
main.cpp:22:17: error: 'cout' was not declared in this scope
   22 |                 cout<<each<<" ";
      |                 ^~~~
main.cpp:23:13: error: 'cout' was not declared in this scope
   23 |             cout<<"\n";
      |             ^~~~
main.cpp:24:13: error: 'counter' was not declared in this scope
   24 |             counter++;
      |             ^~~~~~~
main.cpp:27:20: error: 'target' was not declared in this scope
   27 |         if(currSum>target) return;
      |                    ^~~~~~
main.cpp:30:19: error: 'idx' was not declared in this scope
   30 |         for(int i=idx; i<nums.size(); i++) {
      |                   ^~~
main.cpp:30:26: error: 'nums' was not declared in this scope
   30 |         for(int i=idx; i<nums.size(); i++) {
      |                          ^~~~
main.cpp:32:16: error: 's' was not declared in this scope
   32 |             if(s.count(nums[i])) {
      |                ^
main.cpp:36:13: error: 's' was not declared in this scope
   36 |             s.insert(nums[i]);
      |             ^
main.cpp:37:40: error: 'counter' was not declared in this scope
   37 |             backtrack(nums, path, i+1, counter, target, s);
      |                                        ^~~~~~~
main.cpp:37:49: error: 'target' was not declared in this scope
   37 |             backtrack(nums, path, i+1, counter, target, s);
      |                                                 ^~~~~~

Even with the little bit of C++ I do know I can tell that rectifying all these errors will take a while. The person answering your question will need to find all the relevant libraries and add them to the code.

This is time wasted on solving other issues instead of solving the core problem. This is what reproducible was supposed to mean in minimal reproducible example.

Sure including <bits/stdc++.h> will work but do know that this is something that experienced developers frown upon. You are essentially including all libraries. A good dev wouldn't do that, and hence won't think of doing that... Instead they would waste their time manually adding each relevant library. I hope you get my point.

3)

Then, I pasted two links from the second users profile saying that they aren't runnable either and in all fairness, asked him to downvote and comment on them too. Needless to say, he didn't. Last I flagged the trolling comment of his. Interestingly, my comment was removed by the moderator - not the earlier troll. So, is it acceptable to promote such trolling content?

There are a few assumptions here that need to be fixed.

Firstly, "Troll" is a strong word. Please don't use it if you don't understand its full extent.

Secondly, how do you know that they "asked him to downvote and comment"? (BTW did you read the answer I linked in the comments?). Do note that assuming that someone who commented on you question also downvoted it will make you more likely to not listen to what they have to say.

Why would you ask someone to downvote?

Finally, I agree with the closure, your code needs to be reproducible. Make it that way and your question will likely be opened.

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    Comments are not for extended discussion or debates; that quickly gets unwieldy and unproductive. This conversation has been moved to chat. – Cody Gray Jan 2 at 4:07
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    Addendum: Every change a potential answerer must make to the provided example in order to make it compile is an opportunity to either accidentally insert a new bug or accidentally fix the bug. The first results in useless answers and the second results in no answers. – user4581301 Jan 3 at 22:02
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Does this behavior really count as 'welcoming' to other users? To me it feels more like 'trolling'.

You already got 2 very good answers and I absolutely agree with them. But I would like to offer you another point of view:

This site targets professionals and enthusiasts. Not every professional or enthusiast is always welcomed or treated professionally. Ask a waitress how their day was and you will know what I mean.

The question is not whether you were welcomed. It is not this site's primary goal to welcome you and it was not your goal to feel welcome either. You wanted to solve your problem. This site's mission is to solve your problem. Did you reach that goal?

You didn't.

If you had followed the advice given and presented a runnable program with a solid test case and your debugging experience, then you probably would have a solution by now. You would not be here complaining about how unfair this site is.

So the next time someone asks something of you, think about whether you want a discussion about the ethics and rules or this site and whether asking this of you is fair, or if you'd rather take the advice, get the help and produce a working solution.

Make sure you know where your priorities are. Focus on getting your problem fixed.

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