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I just failed a review audit on this question.

It was closed for "lack of focus", but it didn't look that bad to me.1

Is this just a difference of opinion or did I miss some significant problem? Note that I am not disputing the decision. It's just that usually when I fail a review audit, I can take another look at the question and immediately see what I missed. In this case, I honestly don't; I might downvote this question for lack of research effort, but it's well focused; I wouldn't have voted to close it in the first place. To avoid making such mistakes in the future, I'd like more help understanding what I'm missing.

I guess my point here, given all the discussion below, is that I thought that audit questions were supposed to be cut-and-dried "you obviously weren't paying attention, or you don't really understand opening and closing".

People keep suggesting this: Breaking down "too broad"/"needs more focus" and trying to understand it. I honestly don't understand how it answers my question, except "All close reasons are subjective", in which case it feels like I might as well give up...


1 It was also labeled as "possible spam", but I couldn't see anything (like cryptic links) that would have indicated spam ...

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  • I'm not sure I understand why it's closed for lack of focus either. It seems focused and clear. Unless it's the old "Lacks focus" that's being used as a proxy for "Lacks effort" despite that not being a reason to close a Question. The deletion of the post furthers my suspicion on this. – Scratte Dec 18 '20 at 18:29
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    It's a no-effort "gimme teh codez" question, but that close reason was removed because it's "not nice". Hence, other close reasons were used for the express purpose of getting it relegated to the garbage where it belongs. Now it is deleted, and all is right with the world. – Ian Kemp Dec 18 '20 at 18:34
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    @IanKemp Except I'm not ok with it. I think "How to" questions, as opposed to my now deleted answer are perfectly okay to ask. – 10 Rep Dec 18 '20 at 18:35
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    @IanKemp I strongly disagree with you on this. I do not see it as garbage at all. "No effort" is not a reason to close. Lots of very good posts has come about with seemingly no effort Questions. I find the deletion of this post to be counter what Stack is all about and a big de-motivating factor for my contributions here. When I search for Answers I cannot find them when they've been deleted. – Scratte Dec 18 '20 at 18:36
  • @10Rep I assume you'd be happy with "how to install Visual Studio"-type questions, then? – Ian Kemp Dec 18 '20 at 18:38
  • @IanKemp the example question you give would be closed as a duplicate. But if there is no dupe target then I think it's perfect. Future readers will benefit by learning how to install a popular ide. – 10 Rep Dec 18 '20 at 18:39
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    @Scratte "Lots of very good posts has come about with seemingly no effort Question" Firstly, citation needed. Secondly, even if that is true, I can guarantee you that the amount of bad no-effort questions vastly outnumber the amount of good ones. – Ian Kemp Dec 18 '20 at 18:40
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    @IanKemp that's like saying "We shouldn't make cars available to the public because the number of bad drivers will outnumber the number of good drivers".I don't drive but I can tell that that would be a bad idea. – 10 Rep Dec 18 '20 at 18:43
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    @IanKemp I do not need to cite something that I say. Secondly, there's absolutely noway I'm going to link a post here that's low effort no matter how good the Answers are on it. I know what happens to them when they're posted on meta! But go and search for "That's the difference between git pull and git fetch" or "How to I loop an array in javaScript". I've yet to find a non-low-effort post when I'm actually trying to solve a problem and land on a post at Stack. We're not all experts and lots of us are just trying to work out simple things. – Scratte Dec 18 '20 at 18:43
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    @10Rep Yeah, that was a terrible example - try to forget I suggested it and focus on this instead: what value does that question offer, WRT how many other people are likely to have that specific need? The answer is that it has very little value, especially from the point of view of Stack Overflow as a high-quality repository of Q&A. Therefore it doesn't belong here. – Ian Kemp Dec 18 '20 at 18:47
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    You cannot predict the future, @IanKemp. You cannot know that no one will benefit from it. You're deleting a post out of the assumption that no one will. The post doesn't harm the site, It didn't even get a chance. Your entire argument is flawed. – Scratte Dec 18 '20 at 18:51
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    @IanKemp So you're saying that SO should have very specific question. Then we shouldn't allow regex questions at all because they are all "specific". And in any case, why do we close questions that aren't "specific" if we don't want specific questions? Needs More Focus is for closing questions that are not specific... but you said those are the type of questions that we want. – 10 Rep Dec 18 '20 at 18:52
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    @10Rep But that is exactly how the real world works - things that are (supposedly) more bad than good end up heavily regulated or outright banned, for the public good. The stats for cars skew more towards the good than the bad, hence why they're allowed. – Ian Kemp Dec 18 '20 at 18:52
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Frankly, I find it quite unclear and broad.

They propose the following rather complex regex, and they say

^[,.']|[-!$%^&*()_+|~=`\\#@{}\[\]:";<>?\/]

which doesn't allow any special character in the name.

Lau@ren --> InValid
$Lauren --> InValid
Lau-ren --> InValid
-Lauren- --> InValid
Lauren007 --> Valid
Lauren --> Valid

I want it to accept the hyphen(-) in between characters

Lau-ren 

From this I would understand that the regex does not match any of the strings that say "invalid", matches the ones that say "valid", and finally that they want it to also match the one that says Lau-ren.

But there are several problems:

  • the "special characters" are not defined anywhere but on the code, and the code can be the problem, so that's not good enough.
  • the regex does the opposite of what I'd expect, because on testing their regex I see it "matches" invalid entries instead of matching valid ones.
  • Also, it's unclear why they are not using the same approach to detect this than the one they are using to detect a "username" starting with a comma, a period or a single quote (^[,.']).
  • The approach seems inherently wrong ("forbidden" characters vs "allowed" characters can open the door for problems down the road.)
  • If pared down, the problem of their question (match a dash only on the first or last character, to detect the "invalid" entries), is certainly a dupe.

There are too many problems. It's not adequately scoped. It's not a useful question for future visitors in any way, because the only useful questions one can find digging in there, are duplicates.

You can argue about the nuances for the different closing reasons if anything (not that that is very useful), but I don't see the argument for reopening it.

Since the question was deleted, here is a complete screen-shot for those that cannot see it.


Mmmmh. I disagree with almost all Cody's points, and I thought I wasn't an idiot either. Maybe I am, who knows. Not the harshest lesson 2020 would have taught me so far.

Starting a back and forth between answers here would not be a great use of anyone's time, IMO, so I'll just leave Cody's points stand despite thinking most of them are flat out wrong or weird.

In any case, while Cody's edit improved the post, as it usually happens with his edits, I think that the edit only managed to polish a turd that at best it's an X/Y problem and dupe.

I know better to start a close-vote war with a mod, despite any recently lessons I may have been taught, and considering I hadn't even voted on the original question in any way I'll just move on. I remain convinced it was a fair closure and and incorrect reopening, but we live to learn.

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    This pretty much sums up how I feel. It's simultaneously a very specific problem ("this particular regex doesn't work"), but also a very broad and general one ("a regex doesn't work with a specific character") that, if the asker had thought further than the end of their nose, they would have easily found a solution to on SO. In other words, it's both too broad (valid close reason) and gimme teh codez (invalid close reason), and most questions that are the first also tend to be the second - so the valid close reason is applicable in this instance. – Ian Kemp Dec 18 '20 at 19:05
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    I read it differently. A match on the regex means the string is not OK. I even found it obvious as it contains all the special characters that they do not allow. – Scratte Dec 18 '20 at 19:05
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    That's fine @Scratte, that's only one problem with this question. Not the most important. And even if you understand it immediately the same way than the asker, I can see other users feeling as confused as I was and expressing their opinion with their close-votes. – yivi Dec 18 '20 at 19:09
  • I see. I cannot see the post anymore, so I cannot tell if anyone told the author that they found the post unclear. The next thing is "Why are they using this regex and not another?" Which I'd also find quite obvious to be: Because they're inexperienced and that's what worked. A good Answer would address that. – Scratte Dec 18 '20 at 19:12
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    That they are inexperienced is irrelevant. Discussing about "why need focus and not unclear" is mostly a waste of time. All the things you find "obvious", I do not, sorry to disagree. I think it was correctly closed. Since there were many problems, lack of focus was more appropriate than "unclear", but in the end that's not the important bit regarding the closure and its use as an audit. – yivi Dec 18 '20 at 19:16
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    @IanKemp that makes no sense. how can a post be broad and specific at the same time? – The Preserver Dec 18 '20 at 19:38
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    I super agree with yivi's assessment. The [mcve] poorly encapsulates the necessary logic and there is insufficient detail to accurately prove answers to be in/correct. – mickmackusa Dec 18 '20 at 22:13
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I agree with you; that's a bad audit, compounded by a series of lazy reviewers.

While there are almost certainly some issues with the question, as yivi pointed out, those issues are not at all obvious upon first inspection. I intentionally looked at the question before looking at any of the answers here, and it did not appear to me as something that needed to be closed. You might call me an idiot, but:

  • I'm not.
  • As you said, review audits are supposed to be obvious. This one wasn't obvious. Not by long-shot.
  • The issues noted with the post require too much domain knowledge to determine. That is more than we can reasonably expect a reviewer to diagnose.
  • Nobody who was involved in the question took the time to point out any of these flaws or ask any clarification questions.

I won't argue with the issues that yivi pointed out… I changed my mind. I went back and read the question more carefully, alongside yivi's objections, and I think most of them are specious. Let's go through his bullet points:

  • the "special characters" are not defined anywhere but on the code, and the code can be the problem, so that's not good enough.

This is a reasonable objection. The question probably needs some clarification about what, precisely, is meant by "special characters". That would have been a good question for someone to ask in the comments.

Still, I think it's reasonable, based on the examples that are shown and standard usage of the term, to assume that the asker meant "anything that is not alphanumeric". You could argue that we shouldn't make assumptions when answering questions, but: (A) we do it all the time, (B) fine, but someone should have at least asked, and (C) the question wasn't closed for being unclear.

  • the regex does the opposite of what I'd expect, because on testing their regex I see it "matches" invalid entries instead of matching valid ones.

Hmm, okay. Seems like an irrelevant nitpick. The "direction" of a regular expression can be trivially reversed, and whether it matches or excludes seems to be largely a matter of taste, not a critical issue with the question's clarity. (And don't forget that the question wasn't even closed for lacking clarity.)

Furthermore, there's nothing inconsistent between the regular expression and the description provided in the question. They say that their regex "doesn't allow any special character in the name". What's the simplest, most straightforward way to implement this? A regular expression that would "match" on invalid input, thus signaling that the input should be rejected. Huh, so that's exactly what they have.

Also, it's unclear why they are not using the same approach to detect this than the one they are using to detect a "username" starting with a comma, a period or a single quote (^[,.']).

You mean, it's unclear because the answer is obvious? That's a weird argument. It's almost as if that could have been posted as an answer to the question. Or at least a comment requesting clarification if they were looking for something else. It definitely doesn't make the question too broad.

The approach seems inherently wrong ("forbidden" characters vs "allowed" characters can open the door for problems down the road.)

That's not a reason to close a question. Ever. Full stop.

I'd let you get away with that being a reason to downvote a question. Or maybe even a reason to leave a pointed comment. But it's not a close reason. If you think it is, you need to re-read the list of close reasons.

If pared down, the problem of their question (match a dash only on the first or last character, to detect the "invalid" entries), is certainly a dupe.

This assessment of "the real problem" is just flat wrong. They aren't trying to match a dash only on the first or last character. They want to modify their existing regex to allow interior dashes, but not leading/trailing dashes. That's probably still a duplicate, of course. Yet, no one suggested any duplicates! The question wasn't closed as being a duplicate.


I do not understand why none of the people who identified these problems with the question saw fit to point them out. (Note: I'm not saying that the question shouldn't have been closed. Any time you think a question is unclear, too broad, or whatever, you should immediately vote to close, without waiting for clarification. But that doesn't mean you shouldn't ask for clarification! Otherwise, how does the asker know what they need to provide in order to make the question eligible for being answered?) Had there been comments pointing out these flaws with the question, then I would have expected you to read them, judge whether the edits had solved those problems, and vote to re-open or leave closed accordingly. But in the absence of any indication that there were serious quality issues with the question, the closure seems misguided.

In particular, it seems like yet another closure triggered based on the presence of certain keywords and/or a general revulsion that the community has developed to questions asking for, um, help. While it's true that "Can someone help me?" is not an actual question, if you think that's all that question said, then you need to take a remedial reading course. What it actually said was the following:

Can someone help me, how can I modify the pattern to allow the hyphen(-) only in between the characters

Granted, the author's grammar was poor, but if you think there's not a question in there, then you have a far weaker grasp on the English language than the asker. What they are saying is:

Can someone help me to modify the pattern to allow the hyphen (-) only in between the characters?

Now, are you seriously going to tell me that that's not a question? This wasn't someone asking for a tutorial. This wasn't someone throwing up their hands and just saying, "I need help!" So put away all of your canned comments and pent-up rage at these types of questions, because this ain't it.

I'm growing very tired of comments like:

It's a no-effort "gimme teh codez" question, but that close reason was removed because it's "not nice". Hence, other close reasons were used for the express purpose of getting it relegated to the garbage where it belongs. Now it is deleted, and all is right with the world.

At best, perception that a question lacks effort is a downvote reason. It's not a close reason. There has never been a close reason that had anything to do with effort, so it couldn't have been "removed". Furthermore, even if there were such a reason, it wouldn't have been removed because it's "not nice". It would be removed because it's fundamentally inappropriate. The purpose of Q&A is to answer questions, not to reward effort.

If you are abusing other close reasons for the purpose of getting questions closed because you think the asker didn't put in enough effort, you are literally breaking the rules. Don't be surprised if you begin to see consequences for that abuse of the system. You'd better start doing the analysis that yivi did, and identifying actual, concrete, fixable problems—tangible areas where the question lacks clarity—because this "no effort" excuse just isn't going to cut it anymore.


Whether or not one agrees with me that the question was appropriately closed in the first place, or one thinks it still lacks clarity in its problem definition, or one is ready to strangle me for having re-opened it, it's an inconvertible fact that you should not have failed this audit because of voting to re-open. In your case, your reviewing privileges are not suspended for having failed that audit. Failing a single audit is not enough to earn a suspension from review—which is a good thing, because there are bad audits out there, and they do catch even good reviewers.

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TL;DR: There is no "lacks effort" close reason.

It was closed with that reason because the OP didn't explain what they have tried. Typically question askers need to provide some research effort so answerers know exactly how to help the OP. Although I disagree with that, it's the way SO works unfortunately.

"How to" questions are acceptable by themselves, but if the question was phrased like this:

My code works, like [this], but I want to make it so that it does [something]. [This] is what I have tried but it doesn't work. what am I doing wrong?

Then SO can't close it with a close reason and it will be fine.


Oh yeah, and the spam notification isn't aware of audits, so don't worry about that at all.

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    I think they did try something. Had they not tried anything, there wouldn't have been a regex to being with and comments would have come in with "What have you tried" and "Post your code". But they posted what they had and wanted to expand on it. – Scratte Dec 18 '20 at 19:18
  • The spam notification is aware of audits. It was intentionally added to the audit to try and fake out the reviewer. Also, what Scratte said. – Cody Gray Dec 19 '20 at 5:29

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