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A little background:

I recently joined Stack Overflow and found its community quite helpful. I enjoy browsing through the questions now (although I am unable to answer a lot of them) and reading fun answers. I am also a high school student (sorry) that wants to major in computer science. I also live in the US and want to go to college in the US (if that's relevant).

If I have managed to get at least 1k reputation, would it help me in a college application? Do colleges usually ask about these things? Should I mention this in my application?

Note: This question was inspired by this question, but it is different because I am asking about college applications, not job interviews.

Edit: I am a little confused on why my post was closed when this post wasn't? I'm not angry, just curious.

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    There's absolutely no reason to apologize for being a high school student. Most of us were in the same position at some point :)
    – cigien
    Dec 12 '20 at 18:48
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    If a college asks you about your Stack Overflow reputation, I'd consider a different college.
    – Nick
    Dec 12 '20 at 19:11
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    I am currently in the US, and want to go to college in the US (preferably some type of stem-focused university) Dec 12 '20 at 20:12
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    I'm quite confused by the closure of this question. How is it any more or less opinion based than the linked question asking about the value of SO reputation in job interviews? I'm voting to reopen this question.
    – cigien
    Dec 12 '20 at 20:17
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    If I would ask a college if they want to know the reputation score, then I would also ask them if they still haven't understood that reputation means nothing and especially doesn't represent any quality in my contributions. When they answer both questions with "yes", then I would mention my reputation in the application.
    – Tom
    Dec 12 '20 at 20:19
  • @cigien I like the question but it is in fact opinion-based. You can only do assumptions and generalizations. It's rather confusing that the other question, which I also like, is still open.
    – akuzminykh
    Dec 12 '20 at 20:23
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    @akuzminykh Yes, of course it's partly opinion based, as posts with the discussion tag generally are. I agree, the inconsistency with the "job interview" question is quite confusing.
    – cigien
    Dec 12 '20 at 20:25
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    See also this question: academia.stackexchange.com/q/40928
    – legoscia
    Dec 12 '20 at 21:07
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    @AlexeiLevenkov I'd rather not go into the details of the close reasons at the moment. The more relevant point here is that I think you are underestimating how many students as well as educators, are active participants on this site. In the tags that I follow, I know of several high school students who contribute valuable content. I myself am an educator, and there are other educators who participate actively as well. This question is of interest to both these groups. I don't believe that SO, or programming in general is exclusively for people who do it in a professional capacity.
    – cigien
    Dec 12 '20 at 21:19
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If I have managed to get at least 1k reputation, would it help me in a college application?

Yes, and in fact you don't need to have earned 1K reputation for it to help your application. Reputation on Stack Overflow is a fairly good indicator of your ability to contribute to the technical knowledge base that the site is trying to build.

If you've earned your reputation through asking questions, that indicates that you are curious about how things work, and have the ability to do the necessary research in order to ask interesting, and useful questions.

If you've earned your reputation through answering questions, that indicates that you have at least a decent understanding of the subject material. More importantly, it shows that you know how to comprehend questions that are asked by other people, and are able to provide a contained answer that addresses exactly the asked question.

Any combination of the above are very good signs of your ability to both gain knowledge, and share that knowledge with others. Both of these are extremely valuable skills to possess and would be considered a very positive addition to any application. I know that I would personally look much more favorably on an application that had this information.

Do colleges usually ask about these things?

No, to my knowledge no college will actually ask about this, if for no other reason than that most high school students will not even have heard about Stack Overflow, and even fewer will have earned any considerable reputation here.

Frankly, not all college application boards will even know about Stack Overflow, but even those that do will not ask for this information.

Should I mention this in my application?

Absolutely, for all the reasons mentioned above. This information would be valued at any college that cares about accepting students who've demonstrated a clear desire, and ability to learn.

At the very least, it can't hurt your application to include this information, so there is no doubt in my mind that you should do so.


Addendum:

I think this should go without saying, but just to be absolutely clear, sharing your Stack Overflow profile in a college application is only a good idea if you have contributed valuable content. If most of your questions and/or answers have received a lot of negative attention, then this is not a positive sign, and you would probably want to avoid bringing that up in your application.

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    "[...], sharing your Stack Overflow profile in a college application is only a good idea if you have contributed valuable content.", thank you for adding that. I was just about to write a comment to point it out.
    – akuzminykh
    Dec 12 '20 at 20:25
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    "Reputation on Stack Overflow is a fairly good indicator of your ability to contribute to the technical knowledge base that the site is trying to build." - err, no. The help center sums up what I'm about to say: "Reputation is a rough measurement of how much the community trusts you;". It's not a measure of knowledge, and it's often not a good measure of quality. I know of a 20k (possibly 30k now) who nearly exclusively posts trash questions, and always has.
    – Zoe
    Dec 12 '20 at 21:53
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    We also have lots of examples of old questions with thousands of votes that possibly always have been considered off-topic, but that for a number of usually random reasons have been left alone. As for the technical knowledge specifically, I'm fairly good with Python, but (last I checked anyway), my tag score is -1. Some times, reputation gain or loss is purely circumstantial - I'd even go as far as argue that the bulk of reputation gain is based on being in the right place at the right time rather than providing lots of good answers, purely because most of those answers will probably
    – Zoe
    Dec 12 '20 at 21:55
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    never be voted on again.
    – Zoe
    Dec 12 '20 at 21:56
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    @Zoe 1) I'm certainly aware that there are users whose rep doesn't correlate with quality, but I wouldn't go so far as to say that there is not correlation at all. 2) I hope that my answer has not implied the converse, i.e. that low rep indicates no knowledge of the material. If that is unclear I'd be happy to edit. 3) Yes, some users have gained a lot of rep due to historical contingency, i.e. being in the right place at the right time. It's not clear to me why that would apply to high school students in 2020, who could only have been participating on the site for at most a couple of years.
    – cigien
    Dec 12 '20 at 22:03
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    Anyone who bases a decision strictly on reputation deserves what they get. However, reputation is a good proxy for participation, and if you've participated by contributing a large quantity of content here, then someone who sees your application can go to your profile and review what you've actually posted. Seems straightforward to me. Just don't bank on anyone in a recruiting or hiring office actually caring. Neither my reputation nor what I consider to be extremely high quality answers have helped me one whit with either over the last decade.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Dec 13 '20 at 5:35

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