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I just created my first tag -

I didn't see questions about using this API as fitting within other tags, which is why I created it. I took the text for the tag explanation from this site: https://web.dev/browser-nativefs/ and also referenced it. I don't know:

  1. If the description as I added it is "correct" by SO standards.
  2. If it's okay that I cut/copied from web.dev and cited them as the source for more information. Please give me feedback and if I have erred in any way I will try to fix as per your recommendations.
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    The usage guidance needs to be how to use the tag, not about the tag. They need to usually be different. I just suggested an edit to the best of my ability. – 10 Rep Nov 22 '20 at 22:49
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    When I edited tags in a similar way, I got rejected with: "This edit copies a significant amount of content from an external source. Generic descriptions such as encyclopedia articles and ad copy do not provide useful guidance; try creating something useful to this community specifically, and be sure to attribute the original author. See: How to reference material written by others." – Tomerikoo Nov 23 '20 at 8:55
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The tag usage part could probably do with more info. Generally, that's the single-most important part of a tag wiki.

  • How is this tag used together with other tags? For example, does language or browser matter? If so, how should it be used together with language and/or browser tags? There's almost certainly a relation between the API and programming/script languages used to access it.

  • Are there other related or unrelated tags that could create confusion or overlap? I don't know this topic, but there are some 20+ various "native-something" tags. in particular sounds like an existing tag that could potentially cause mis-tagging or confusion. You might want to clear out such cases even if they aren't related to the topic/scope of your tag, how is your tag different from tag x and how should they be used: "if your question is about x, use tag y" etc.

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  • Thank you so much! I've improved the guidance on this tag thanks you your suggestions – ControlAltDel Nov 24 '20 at 15:34
  • @ControlAltDel Looks nice, significant improvement :) However (and again - I don't have a clue about the topic), shouldn't you rather recommend to use asynchronous-javascript instead of asynchronous, because the latter is an overly broad/strange tag for "everything asynchronous". Also, if the API uses JavaScript only, then javascript should probably be made mandatory for all questions using your tag, so that they always get proper code formatting? – Lundin Nov 24 '20 at 15:40
  • good point. I didn't know about asynchronous-javascript tag, and was just updating the usage (after you saw it presumably) to say not to include this tag unless this the poster needs help with using asynchronous javascript api. I'll go back and correct to asynchronous-javascript. -Edit- In fact, I'm going to take asynchronous out of this entirely. It would be better to split the asynchronous part into it's own question to make the question more useful to future views on SO and also question duplication – ControlAltDel Nov 24 '20 at 15:44
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First of all: Be reluctant when you copy text verbatim from elsewhere, specially if it will be the major part of your excerpt or wiki. It is hardly ever the case that content found on the internet is a good fit in tag guidance.

Let's revisit the blog post Redesdigned tags page by J. Atwood.

Reading that the goal of tags roughly comes down to:

Tags are the de-facto map of allowed [...] topics on your site. Reliable tag cartography is essential to navigation and exploration.

With that said let's go over the bullets mentioned in that same blog post and see how your excerpt and wiki do.

  • The excerpt is the elevator pitch for the tag
    You could argue the sales blurb found in the read me is a good pitch but what we are looking for is the pitch for the tag on Stack Overflow. We have different goals and a different focus. If you're about to ask a question you're already familiar with the concept the tag is about. You need to offer guidance if the specific question is a good fit.

  • Avoid generically defining the concept behind a tag, unless it is highly specialized.
    A tag is not documentation although it can have guidance to prevent that questions get asked or that questions have enough substance to be answerable. Explaining what native-fs is not key here. What might be relevant is which browser is being used, maybe which OS. Maybe there are debugging / diagnosing tools that are helpful in providing info for users that want to answer.

  • Concentrate on what a tag means to your community
    In the tag wiki and if possible the excerpt you need to convey why and how questions and their answers matter in the scope of the site. Your excerpt and wiki don't address that aspect.

  • Provide basic guidance on when to use the tag.
    Not all questions might be on-topic. And some questions better go with additional tags. Examples are questions which might benefit with an additional tag to indicate which language or regex-flavor is used. Similar for where knowing if we talk about or matters. That is crucial info to add to the wiki. It is lacking from your first revision.

  • Some tags are common knowledge.
    This bullet is not applicable here. It argues that you don't have to explain common known tags. I don't think we are all yet on the same page when it comes to this native filesystem stuff for browsers. Leaving the wiki or excerpt empty is bad advice in this case.

TL;DR

We need a substantial different excerpt and tag wiki. Do not think as if you need to sell the tag. Instead assume you write a recipe for the perfect question. The excerpt gets us excited, the wiki takes us through the steps to create awesome content for easy consumption.

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  • Thank you so much! I've improved the guidance on this tag thanks you your suggestions – ControlAltDel Nov 24 '20 at 15:33

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