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I'm unhappy with the bait-and-switch job advertised here:

Paid Research Study for Developers who are new to Python and VS Code.

In order to be considered, you must take the survey below. Thank you!

...

Survey: Early Career Developer Study Sign-Up

It turns out that this "Study Sign-Up" survey is just harvesting a bunch of personal information and my shopping habits. What does any of this have to do with my use of Python and VS Code?

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I doubt there's any paid opportunity at all, and this company is just trying to get consumer data for free.

My question is related to this one but unlike that question, I'm not against paid research opportunities on the job page. I'm against the bait and switch.

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Thank you for bringing this to our attention. I can confirm that this is not in line with our policy on Stack Overflow Jobs.

This was an exceptional situation that arose due to a legacy agreement where the client was permitted to use listings to find participants for their research studies provided that they were clear and upfront about it.

We have relayed these concerns and we’re actively working with the client on more effective and appropriate ways to promote their studies. We have agreed to a transition period through till the end of the year after which point these listings should no longer appear on the site.

This was a one-off and there should be no other known instances of listings that aren’t about real job opportunities. We’ve also taken this opportunity to review & reiterate our Jobs policy internally to avoid such situations in the future.

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    I am somewhat concerned about the extremely long delay in response on a critical issue like this. It very much undermines faith in the quality of the Jobs platform. What processes have you changed internally to prioritize responses? Also, can you address why you have decided to let people continue to run surveys that actively subvert the purpose and mission of the platform? I used to be very excited about the Jobs platform, mainly because it was touted as being a well-managed platform, but seeing the almost complete lack of management control and response, I have lost most of my faith in it. – Cody Gray Dec 19 '20 at 1:05
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    @CodyGray I hear your concerns. The delay in response was unfortunate; we needed the time to gather all the appropriate context and speak to the client, which took a while due to the holiday season in the US. This wasn't a straightforward situation where someone was acting in bad faith, which we've swiftly resolved in the past. They had a prior agreement in place, which pre-dates my team, where they were permitted to do so. Not trying to justify the decision - it shouldn't have happened - just providing context as to why this took us a while to resolve. (1/2) – Puneet Mulchandani Dec 21 '20 at 19:00
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    (2/2) The client has been receptive to the feedback and is engaging with us, hence the short transition period while we finalize plans. I understand your disappointment, and I'm sorry we fell short of our mission to provide high-quality job listings. We will do better. – Puneet Mulchandani Dec 21 '20 at 19:00
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    "delay....due to the holiday season" ... seriously? Sounds like a "dog ate my homework" excuse – charlietfl Jan 15 at 12:12
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I'll start with a free review of their research software and implementation of this survey, which, for a research institute, is hilarious:

  • Yes, let's ask for a year of birth, and on the next page, for an age. For a user born in 2000, it's terribly important to know whether they're 19 or 20. (Mumbles obvious control question)
  • When a page contains one input element, why accept Enter to go to the next page? You have a mouse for a reason.
  • Let's stop showing the back button halfway into the survey.
  • Let's start showing checkmarks in checkboxes, also just halfway into the survey. The grey boxes shown before were getting boring.
  • If you have two options and a "None of the above", make sure you accept all three simultaneously. This too is fixed halfway into the survey.
  • Let's show a progress bar and a percentage, and make sure the percentage stays at 0%.
  • Let's fill the progress bar up till ~ 75% in about 15 pages of questions, and then suddenly entirely fill the progress bar and finish the survey.

All joking about crappy software aside, they're pretty explicit: they want to pay $125 and invest an hour of their time in you, only if they find you a relevant subject. In order to determine that, you're going to have to enter some personal data. If you want to risk that information being used for free for other purposes, then that's up to you.

No privacy policy to be found, they just state:

As always, your information is used strictly for research purposes. Your data will remain confidential, and will never be sold or distributed to other parties. Your privacy is safe with us.

Or did you want to ask Stack Overflow whether this is allowed use of the Jobs platform? They probably accepted it because it was paid for.

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    "find you a relevant subject"... relevant to what? Python IDEs, or online shopping? More likely they're getting paid by Nordstrom to figure out what percent of their customers also use Amazon Wardrobe, or something like that, and these numerous paid survey opportunities are all bogus. – C8H10N4O2 Nov 18 '20 at 20:04
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    That's for them to decide. If they only want to interview VS Code users who are new to Python, and live in the Greater Seattle Area who have a Ring doorbell and are deaf in one ear, then that's up to them, isn't it? They'll have a plan for those interviews which we don't know, nor have to know. – CodeCaster Nov 18 '20 at 20:06
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    "your information is used strictly for research purposes" - read: never ever will we use it for such things as offering you a job... – piet.t Nov 19 '20 at 7:03

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