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The FAQ for the burnination process states, in part (link in quote preserved):

If the proposal does not reach a score of at least 20, a moderator will not feature it. Apathy should not be interpreted as a sign of support. If it does not reach the required score of 20 within 6 months, the request may be marked . If in future, the tag becomes problematic, a new proposal should be started.

So that much is clear. A new proposal may be made for a previously declined one.

However, the link in the above quote says "may be marked" rather than "will be marked", leaving some posts in limbo. As the linked post (plugging the holes) notes:

"Do nothing and wait", seems a straightforward answer, but most of these are already many years old. Newer requests are being marked as duplicates of older ones which will never be heard of again.

This implies a new proposal should not be made for a request in that "may be marked" window.

I recently came across a tag that I thought should be burninated and did some of the initial evaluation steps. Prior to posting the request, I searched and found a prior request to burninate it, from March 2018. It had 17 upvotes (0 downvotes) and was long past the 6 month window. Since it had not yet been declined, I could not use the first option above to repost, and chose to answer the question with the updated information and burnination criteria evaluation. My answer briefly brought it back to the light of day and generated 4 upvotes, and 5 more upvotes for the question/proposal, so it now totals 22 (but not in 6 months).

However, the brief moment at the top of the Meta list was short-lived. Since it was an older post it was ineligible to be rotated through "Hot Meta Posts" and two weeks later, has faded into oblivion. I could keep editing my answer or the question to bump it, but that seems to be not appropriate.

An answer to the "plugging the holes" post notes:

A part of the solution lies in renewed exposure for long standing requests. Everything that is off the first few pages doesn't get exposed, so can't get any upvotes. To overcome new requests being dupe-hammered against fossils, we might want to consider adding a new status tag. [Status-Aged-Away]. We could implement this on requests older then 6-8 months, and then prevent them from being used as a dupe target.

That sounds like a reasonable idea, but as Bhargav Rao noted in comments, "I'm more concerned about the 6-8 months, do we really need to wait 6 months for a score to reach 20? In about 2 weeks, a burn request would get hidden in the abyss. I think 30 days is ample time. If you can't get support within 30 days, then it's clear that no one is that bothered by the tag."

I'm interested in a more definitive discussion of this comment. Can we assume that a tag that didn't initially receive enough support is likely never going to be a problem? Is it appropriate to post a duplicate request for a very old post that didn't reach the 20-vote threshold if we think the tag has become a problem in the years hence? If not, is it appropriate to request that old post be declined in order to enable a non-duplicate new proposal?

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    An 'status-aged-away' tag would also be helpful for feature requests that have been in limbo forever as well (and that get dupehammered if you try to re-raise) – Daniel F Nov 18 '20 at 9:49
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    There are plenty more upvoted examples of feature_request tags with no matching status-* tag, that's just one close to my heart :) – Daniel F Nov 18 '20 at 9:54
  • While the calculation tag does no good, it does no real harm either. I'd contrast this with the request yesterday for renaming/synonymizing of the spm tag (What should be done to the spm tag?). That was actively harmful because questions that should have been tagged with swift-package-manager were being mistagged. The incorrect tags were fixed; the tag spm was renamed to matlab-spm, and a synonym created so that spm is treated as matlab-spm. That really does help. – Jonathan Leffler Nov 20 '20 at 4:11
  • @JonathanLeffler sounds like a great "answer" in dissent on that questions. I'd even upvote it. – Daniel Widdis Nov 20 '20 at 6:32
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If the previous burnination request has not been marked as declined, then you don't need to start a new one. If you have evidence and/or arguments to offer in favor of removing the tag, then post an answer to the original burnination request that pleads your case.


Can we assume that a tag that didn't initially receive enough support is likely never going to be a problem?

I'd say generally yes, but not necessarily. I'm a staunch advocate for not wasting time on pointless burnination requests. As Shog9 said:

There are a lot of s posted to various meta sites that are... To put it gently... A complete and utter waste of everyone's time. Some folks will seemingly post a request for any tag they come across that isn't interesting to them personally - and then try to justify it with some hand-waving about a lack of experts.

But I also recognize that our burnination process is imperfect. We don't always get the buy-in that we want or need from those who would be affected most by the proposed changes. Reopening the discussion to allow those experts to chime in is not a problem in my eyes, and isn't a possibility that we want to foreclose just because an imperfect system failed us the first time that it was considered.

Is it appropriate to post a duplicate request for a very old post that didn't reach the 20-vote threshold if we think the tag has become a problem in the years hence?

As stated above, I don't see why you would need to do that. It's common practice on Meta to use answers as a platform for endorsing or criticizing a proposal advanced in the question. Burninations are no different. If you want to "reopen" an orphaned proposal, then just post an answer.

If not, is it appropriate to request that old post be declined in order to enable a non-duplicate new proposal?

Nah. A burnination proposal that's been recently declined isn't going to be eligible for new discussion, so asking a moderator to decline the existing one is kinda shooting yourself in the foot if you want to re-open it.

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  • Do you feel the stated concern of old posts not receiving the light of day for long as not a big deal then? At least from a passing glance, I'm inclined to believe that an old request with a new answer has less a chance to get the views/ discussion it needs than a new post does. – zcoop98 Nov 19 '20 at 0:25
  • @zcoop98 Actually, I take issue with your claim that "an old request with a new answer has less a chance to get the views/ discussion it needs than a new post does". There is no difference. Activity on a post causes it to be bumped to the front page. That activity can be posting the question itself anew, or it can be posting an answer to an existing question. – Cody Gray Nov 19 '20 at 0:28
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    So, it is definitely an issue that old posts don't receive the light of day. I said that above: "But I also recognize that our burnination process is imperfect. We don't always get the buy-in that we want or need from those who would be affected most by the proposed changes." However, I disagree that the correct solution is to post duplicates. – Cody Gray Nov 19 '20 at 0:29
  • Fair and fair, that makes sense. – zcoop98 Nov 19 '20 at 0:31
  • @CodyGray RE: "an old request with a new answer has less a chance to get the views/ discussion it needs than a new post does". I disagree that "there's no difference", primarily because of the impact cited in my OP: new questions with 3+ upvotes get randomly rotated into "Hot Meta Posts" and gain visibility that old/bumped posts do not. – Daniel Widdis Nov 19 '20 at 3:43
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TL;DR Answer the original request instead of posting a new request.

The "declined if it doesn't reach a score of 20" part of the post you cite doesn't appear to be true, at least not on Stack Overflow, which has by far the most activity in terms of tag removal. (Personally, I have a request that's over 3 years old; it has a score of 17 and has never been "officially" accepted or rejected). Typically, burnination requests are only marked [status-declined] if they've actually been reviewed by the community and people disagreed (or, occasionally, if the request is so obviously "wrong" that a moderator or staff member just marks it that way).

This is simply a product of how backlogged the request system is; burnination requests come in far more often than they get featured (which is a requirement for them to be formally acted on by the community, at least for large texts).

That being said, if a burnination request already exists and you have new evidence to support (or refute) it, you should add a new answer rather than creating an entirely new question. This'll "bump" it to having new activity.

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  • "burnination requests come in far more often than they get featured" -- I've seen that rate of featuring drop to basically zero lately. ... – Daniel Widdis Nov 19 '20 at 16:11
  • @DanielWiddis add to that the fact that there's no rotation on the hot meta post featured in the community bulletin, if there's a discussion that dominates the CB, your request will never reach the wider community. – Braiam Nov 19 '20 at 16:31
  • @Braiam my understanding is that any new (<3 days) post with 3+ upvotes has equal chance of popping up on Hot Meta Posts when it's rotated every 20 minutes. Is this incorrect? – Daniel Widdis Nov 19 '20 at 20:17
  • @DanielWiddis yes – Braiam Nov 20 '20 at 10:55

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