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Answering this question, I want to quote Python documentation. I tried a few different ways of doing Markdown to keep the tabs (indentation) in the quote and ended up with the fairly ugly version shown now (in the edit history).

I'd prefer not to put things that aren't code in code blocks, but I can't see another way to preserve the structure of the documentation. I suppose I could dig through the documentation page source code and copy the HTML content, but that's a bit advanced for me.

Is there an approved solution for this or should I just throw it in a code block?

I can't imagine this isn't a dupe, but I can't locate it.

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  • tabs are stripped and converted to spaces, and redundant spaces outside code blocks are trimmed. You can just flatten it, and markdown is still supported in quotes (wrt. the list) – Zoe Nov 9 '20 at 13:17
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    so, codeblock inside a quote? – Daniel F Nov 9 '20 at 13:19
  • you can do that too, yeah. – Zoe Nov 9 '20 at 13:20
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    Are the tabs adding much in that documentation? I've just edited and I think that captures the content pretty well. – jonrsharpe Nov 9 '20 at 13:22
  • If that's not what you meant, what did you mean? Because using separate quoted lines with spaces replacing tabs still ended up with everything mushed together - up until the point that everything became a codeblock. – Daniel F Nov 9 '20 at 13:22
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    @jonrsharpe maybe I'm just hyper-sensitive to tabs from staring at python code too long. That looks fine. – Daniel F Nov 9 '20 at 13:24
  • Are you asking about tab as in the character or about tab as in indentation? – MisterMiyagi Nov 9 '20 at 13:40
  • @MisterMiyagi tab as indentation – Daniel F Nov 9 '20 at 13:41
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    The correct markup for this would include <dl>, <dt>, and <dd>, which are part of the supported subset of HTML on Stack Exchange. This still doesn’t indent it, but in the future, the formatting of definition lists may be changed. – Sebastian Simon Nov 9 '20 at 19:41
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    This question doesn't do a very good job of explaining what the actual issue is, since it relies on a link which is changing. – Steve Bennett Nov 10 '20 at 0:56
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    This is something I've struggled with as well and I've pretty much just accepted that the indentation isn't terribly important in such cases. – BoltClock Nov 10 '20 at 8:04
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    "ended up with the fairly ugly version " - looks fine to me. I am actually much less comfortable with format of documentation you are linking to, it's way too ugly mix of nesting, italics and colors there. – Sinatr Nov 10 '20 at 8:24
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If you want to strictly follow the page, you'll have to use HTML, as CommonMark doesn’t offer description lists:

<dl>
   <dt>X: array-like or PIL image</dt>
   <dd>
      <p>The image data. Supported array shapes are:</p>
      <ul>
         <li>(M, N): an image with scalar data. The values are mapped to colors
         using normalization and a colormap. See parameters <em>norm</em>,
         <em>cmap</em>, <em>vmin</em>, <em>vmax</em>.</li>
      </ul>
   </dd>
</dl>

But as you can see, even that doesn’t work, as Stack Exchange explicitly disables <dd> margins with CSS:

X: array-like or PIL image

The image data. Supported array shapes are:

  • (M, N): an image with scalar data. The values are mapped to colors using normalization and a colormap. See parameters norm, cmap, vmin, vmax.

If you want to use Markdown, you can get pretty close with some unordered lists:

- **X**: array-like or PIL image
  - The image data. Supported array shapes are:
    - (M, N): an image with scalar data. The values are mapped to colors using
      normalization and a colormap. See parameters *norm*, *cmap*, *vmin*,
      *vmax*.

Result:

  • X: array-like or PIL image
    • The image data. Supported array shapes are:
      • (M, N): an image with scalar data. The values are mapped to colors using normalization and a colormap. See parameters norm, cmap, vmin, vmax.

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