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Sorry, another 'did I do it wrong?' question - I flagged this question as very low quality, because it clearly has "severe content problems" and I presume the fact that it's now closed suggests that, yes, "it might need to be removed".

And yet when I went to flag something similarly bad just now, I see a message telling me that my last flag was declined, and when I click through, I see "declined - a moderator reviewed your flag, but found no evidence to support it". I don't understand - was I supposed to provide some evidence, somehow? I'm not sure what evidence I could have provided other than "it's obviously very low quality". Perhaps I used the wrong flag? But I can't see a more appropriate one I could have chosen.

How do I avoid this same mistake next time?

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  • 6
    Does this answer your question? When is a closeable question also a "very low quality" question? Nov 3 '20 at 7:49
  • 1
    @JeanneDark, not really, I don't think. I'm not sure I fully followed it all though. It seems to be saying that maybe I should have voted to close it instead of flagging it, but I don't think I'm allowed to do that yet, am I? I get the feeling that maybe I should just avoid flagging things, if not even the moderators actually know what they're for! That can't be right though, can it?
    – DPWork
    Nov 3 '20 at 7:57
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    You cannot vote to close but you can flag such posts for closure. Nov 3 '20 at 7:58
  • Huh? Now I'm more confused! I did flag it, and the flag was declined, hence my question!
    – DPWork
    Nov 3 '20 at 7:58
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    You can flag for closure ("needs improvement") instead of using "very low quality".
    – yivi
    Nov 3 '20 at 7:58
  • See yivi's comment above: You used the wrong flag. Flagging VLQ is not flagging for closure. That's why your flag was declined. Nov 3 '20 at 8:00
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    OK. I see. I think. I mean, clearly I don't. It's incredibly confusing, and from that linked post it seems I'm not alone in thinking so. I think I'll just steer away from flags for now.
    – DPWork
    Nov 3 '20 at 8:01
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    While the "VLQ" flag is a bit broken, as long as you simply ignore that option, it shouldn't be that confusing. You simply flag for "needs improvement" and try to find the appropriate close reason in that list.
    – yivi
    Nov 3 '20 at 8:03
  • Haha, OK, I guess that makes sense :) It seems counter-intuitive that something the OP can fix should be closed, where something that's unsalvageable isn't for closing. Either way, I guess for this specific case it makes sense that the author could have improved it, even if, from the way the question was asked, that seems unlikely! Thanks for your help.
    – DPWork
    Nov 3 '20 at 8:05
  • Closing is precisely meant for questions that the OP and only the OP can fix. After they fix it, the question can be reopened. Some of the other flags are not for closure, but for deletion. Things that not even the OP can fix.
    – yivi
    Nov 3 '20 at 8:07
  • Ahhh, OK. I guess I'd conflated the two terms, thank you, that makes more sense now.
    – DPWork
    Nov 3 '20 at 8:10
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    To add a bit more of an explanation: The VLQ flag brought it to the attention of moderators, but it needed only to be closed. Closing posts is something the community can do and doesn't necessarily need moderator intervention (you flag for closure and the post goes into the review queue where users evaluate it). Declining your VLQ flag is a means to tell you that that post didn't need moderator intervention (they are also volunteers and already have a lot of work to do here). Nov 3 '20 at 8:11
  • OK, cool, thanks for that detailed description; lesson learned (although I can't guarantee that I won't forget it). Is there any diagram showing all these flows? Not having access to the queues etc makes it hard to understand the effects caused by my interactions.
    – DPWork
    Nov 3 '20 at 8:15
  • @DPWork - What flaws do you refer to exactly? Guidance on how to use flags properly is documented in the help center. Nov 3 '20 at 13:53
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    Flows, not flaws. What I mean is that there seems to be some kind of fairly-complex workflow rules operating, triggered by various different flags and/or votes, with actions causing different effects depending on factors like the action and (I think?) the reputation of the person carrying-out the action, and maybe other things too? I appreciate that each thing is documented, but I was hoping there might be some big overarching diagram that would show how actions relate to effects and ultimately outcomes.
    – DPWork
    Nov 3 '20 at 14:07

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