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Today the following comment was spotted:

To the downvoter. The least you can do is leave a f'ing comment as to why this answer deserved a downvote. Common decency and respect is what's lacking. Ignorance obviously is part of your every day life; good luck with that mofo.

In a single comment full of vitriol, the author managed to:

  • shame the downvoter for not posting a comment, which is something we do not mandate nor wish users to be pressured into doing;
  • suggested that the downvoter lacked decency and respect (out of an action that is well in their right to do without leaving a comment);
  • attacked the downvoter's intelligence by calling them an ignorant;
  • also called the downvoter a "mofo".

Even as an anonymous face in this interaction, should the downvoter revisit that page, they would certainly, to say the least, feel unjustly attacked. The subsequent comments posted by the same author were not very in line either, and at this point could even warrant an official warning from a moderator.

This was my rationale towards flagging the comment as Harassment/Abusive. However, the flag was declined, with the comment removed anyway.

Did the fact that the target was anonymous lead to the decision of declining the flag? Or was it a sporadic mistake? And for future reference, should the harassment/abusive flag never be used when there isn't a known name of the person to be referred to in that comment?

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  • 92
    "However, the flag was declined" - on a comment calling someone an ignorant mother fer?, nice. – Nick Oct 28 at 13:51
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    I don't think it was a mistake (as in a misclick). I also saw that comment and flagged it as "unfriendly or unkind" and was declined as well. I don't consider it "harassment", but I certainly consider such a comment "unfriendly". I hadn't realized the flag had been declined until I saw this question and I recognized the comment. I guess that that the comment is gone is the important thing in any case. – yivi Oct 28 at 13:53
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    @yivi I too had that confirmed by another third party: a moderator declined the flag, no question. As my current reasoning sides with this being too out-of-line for just an unfriendly flag, this question serves to understand exactly what went through the process of handling the flag and what we should be doing in the future. – E_net4 is being impersonated Oct 28 at 13:56
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    @yivi I also fall back to NLN in case of doubt. Thing is though, quoted comment doesn't look like the case for doubt. The only doubt I have here is how come that moderator made a mistake handling such a blatantly offensive comment – gnat Oct 28 at 14:44
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    I'd feel a lot better if a mod also had a chat with the user in question. That comment goes beyond offensive, it's actively hostile and toxic (and incredibly oblivious). – Ian Kemp Oct 28 at 15:38
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    @Ian Whatever happens between the user and the mods, if anything, is out of scope for the question. Let's not blow things out of proportion. This was simply about a declined flag, that's all. No need get enthusiastic about the witch-hunting. – yivi Oct 28 at 15:42
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    There are a lot of us old-timers who still feel very strongly that you should not be able to downvote without leaving a comment. Strong enough to call someone a mofo? Maybe. Maybe... – StackOverthrow Oct 28 at 16:06
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    @yivi The level of hostility and disproportionate nature of that response to what apparently triggered it, are concerning. Such apparently irrational anger can be a stress reaction to areas of life that are causing anxiety to the person who is lashing out. I appreciate it isn't the mods' duty to be personal counsellors, but reaching out to this user and simply asking if they are okay is what I would envision. (I understand what you interpreted my suggestion as, and am not offended; my past behaviour that led you to that conclusion is my responsibility. But I can't be an a--hole all the time!) – Ian Kemp Oct 28 at 17:19
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    @StackOverthrow I'm not sure three years qualifies as "old-timer." In my experience, most of the actual veterans of the site are strongly opposed to that suggestion. – John Montgomery Oct 28 at 17:23
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    Note to eventual readers of this diverging comment thread (which I believe could become a target of deletion): the author of the comment in question was suspended. Rest assured that the code of conduct applies to everyone all the same, and that this incident has been taken care of. – E_net4 is being impersonated Oct 28 at 17:41
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    There is some irony that this question is the meta version of that comment (without the vitriol). "To the moderator, the least you can do is explain why this flag was declined. Clarification and consistency is what's lacking." – Cireo Oct 28 at 18:57
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    The greatest thing about comments is they can be ignored. – Robert Harvey Oct 28 at 19:07
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    @JohnMontgomery You realize people have multiple accounts, right? And the majority you speak of was a minority that ganged up and bullied dissenters off the site. – StackOverthrow Oct 28 at 19:27
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    @StackOverthrow please post your evidence for that claim, else some might think that you are trolling. I could not possibly comment myself.. – Martin James Oct 28 at 19:44
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    "Common decency and respect is what's lacking" What an irony ... – Teemu Oct 29 at 19:43
130

That would be my fault.

I saw the rude/abusive flag, but when I read the comment I missed the "f'ing" and "mofo" so while the comment needed to go I didn't think it was rude.

Now that I read the comment again I see that I should have accepted the flag.

Sorry about that.

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  • 71
    It's totally fine. But even without the "f'ing" and "mofo", wouldn't you say phrases like "Common decency and respect is what's lacking. Ignorance obviously is part of your every day life" are unfriendly enough? Or were the expletives the only thing pushing the comment above the threshold? – yivi Oct 28 at 14:48
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    Even without those two words I believe it would still count as rude... and even if not, unkind for sure – John Dvorak Oct 28 at 14:48
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    @yivi - In missing those words I got the tone of the comment wrong. I made a mistake. – ChrisF Oct 28 at 14:49
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    @JohnDvorak - in retrospect I agree. However, I can't change how I processed the flag. – ChrisF Oct 28 at 14:50
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    Cool, thanks. I came without my pitchfork anyway. :) – yivi Oct 28 at 14:50
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    @yivi I wasn't lucky enough to realize that I wouldn't need my pitchfork. Now I have to drag it all the way back. – GalaxyCat105 Oct 28 at 22:52
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    Hey, cut the new mods some slack! ChrisF has only been doing this since... wait... :-) – Cody Gray Oct 28 at 23:08
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    Thank you! I wish we had a best practices page on SO: this answer is an example of how to admit a mistake well (promptly, correctly, and with just the right amount of explanation). – Timur Shtatland Oct 29 at 14:27
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    Keep in mind they spend all day staring at hundreds of comments like this, a mistake once in a while is bound to happen. We've all had that moment where we'd just been doing something for too long, our eyes glaze over, and we need a break, right? :p – Nemo Oct 29 at 21:11
  • If you didn't think the comment was rude, why did you think it needed to go? Simultaneously declining the flag, and deleting the comment, just seems completely contradictory to me, mistake or not. – Asteroids With Wings Oct 30 at 18:10
  • There's a difference between rude and unfriendly. Unfriendly comment still gets the axe, but the poster generally doesn't (unless they've built up a history). – user4581301 Oct 30 at 18:12
68

That flag should not have been declined.

Even under the now long gone Be Nice policy that comment was off-limits. With the new Code of Conduct the rules got more strict and clear: We don't want that kind of content on our site, not in a question, answer or comment.

It is not in the interest of this community that users who think it is okay to post that kind of attacks are given a warning or a second chance or are shielded for consequences of red flags.

It is in the interest of this community that users who raise rude/abusive flags for posts that violate the CoC are taken seriously. The flagger should not have any backlash for faithfully flagging content that is in clear breach of the Code of Conduct.

I'm not sure if the system allows for fixing comment flags after the fact. That would be the preferred outcome here. I assume the mod who clicked the buttons did so in error. If not, I think we, as a community, need to establish clear guidance by example for the mod team that these kind of comments are red flaggable and that raised flags on these kind of comments need to be marked helpful without exceptions.

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    "It is not in the interest of this community that users who think it is okay to post that kind of attacks are given a warning [or] a second chance" - disagree. Sometimes people do learn. – John Dvorak Oct 28 at 14:25
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    @JohnDvorak Alas, although anecdotal, an attempt at instructing the author of this particular comment did not go well. It's not uncommon (I'd dare say it's more common) for a poster of offensive comments to follow up with more heated comments than to learn the lesson. – E_net4 is being impersonated Oct 28 at 14:29
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    The last sentences of this answer are the ones which resonate the most. I don't think there's a way to "repair" comment flags, and I could shrug off a few declined flags much easier than post flags, especially since there is no automatic penalty for flagging too many declined flags. On the other hand, I would really appreciate a consensus and/or guideline on which option to choose for this kind of comment. – E_net4 is being impersonated Oct 28 at 14:30
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    @JohnDvorak I could probably word that better but what I try to explain is that not handling those comments might give the impressions that you can get away once or twice with such comments. Yes, people learn, in this case that needs to be instant learning by coming down hard. Not by some handwaving for the first offense. – rene Oct 28 at 14:32
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    "Even under the now long gone Be Nice policy" Wait... there is no more "Be nice" policy !? – Pac0 Oct 28 at 16:15
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    @Pac0 what can I say. It wasn't enough to "Be Nice". We needed a Code of Conduct. That replaced being nice: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/312850/… – rene Oct 28 at 16:24
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    @rene I would be forthcoming with the user, society and the internet in general are an aggressive place. Joining a forum is also an opportunity of personal growth, if the user understands that language isn't acceptable without getting an outright account nuke (or something overly severe) he'll be given a chance to adjust. I'd point out the forms of passive-aggressive bigotry that while not flaggable are equally as aggressive or even worst than just swearing and a straight insult. We are also not given the full context of provocations that may have triggered that reaction. – bad_coder Oct 28 at 19:32
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    @bad_coder Stack Overflow is not a forum, so there shouldn't be too much discussion in comment that isn't related to the post. As for the rest: I have tried many times to explain and to reason with user, but most times that made me a target. It's best to flag and move on. That comment was also pretty tame, I've seen much worse! – Modus Tollens Oct 28 at 19:46
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    No context would have justified the comment above, @bad_coder. And where one may see an opportunity of self growth, it unfortunately too often becomes grounds for pointless back and forth or backlash. The lesson learned: avoid discussions caused by a downvote. – E_net4 is being impersonated Oct 28 at 20:22

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