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Recently, GitHub and the Git project announced to rename its primary branch from master to main. I strongly feel it would be great if we can take some pro active actions to make the changes in Stack Overflow too.

In most of the elementary GitHub questions the terminology is still master. I feel a simple script by the administrator can do the entire job. It would be better if users who are visiting Git and GitHub tagged questions be shown a pop up or a banner regarding the changes.

Any thoughts?

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    "I feel a simple script by the administrator can do the entire job." I respectively disagree. Something "simple" like UPDATE dbo.Posts SET Body = REPLACE(Body,'master','main'); would likely break the validity of 1000's (if not 10,000's) of answers and questions. It would, at least, need to maintain the casing, and that is (honestly) not very simple in SQL Server without CLR functions; it sucks at string manipulation. Changing all of these "offensive" words to something inoffensive would be a huge undertaking.
    – Larnu
    Oct 27 '20 at 16:01
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    Valid and interesting question, but I disagree (reasons already stated in comment above), hence the downvote.
    – Pac0
    Oct 27 '20 at 16:05
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    An obvious category of edge cases: questions that are already asking about switching away from the master default like stackoverflow.com/q/42871542/3001761. Also I don't think git has changed the default, just added a way for it to be configured and overridden.
    – jonrsharpe
    Oct 27 '20 at 16:27
  • It's a nice sentiment, but there is no simple solution. And as an aside, I bet that if attempted in any large enough scale you would have quite a few users up in arms about it.
    – yivi
    Oct 27 '20 at 16:31
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    Does this answer your question? Can the expression "final solution" be used on the site?
    – gnat
    Oct 27 '20 at 16:57
  • I agree UPDATE dbo.Posts SET Body = REPLACE(Body,'master','main'); will not solve the problem. Of course, it needs a little bit more complicated work. Like filtering all tags related to github and git and changing only if it contains git in the answer. This would rectify in a lot of answers but it is highly unlikely to screw up right once
    – Trect
    Oct 27 '20 at 17:07
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    Why is this important? Why should the name of a technical term change?
    – Dharman
    Oct 27 '20 at 19:08
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    "Like filtering all tags related to github and git and changing only if it contains git in the answer" That's still a heavy assumption. Just because a question references git doesn't mean that the code in it, or references to master are the master branch, and should be changed.
    – Larnu
    Oct 27 '20 at 22:25
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    No, we don't need to rename master. First, contrary to popular belief it is neither racist nor offensive term. Next, it carries more meaning than simple name in Git context. It depicts default repository branch. So if someone asks about doing something in context of master branch then there may be differences in what happens with such default branch comparing to any other randomly named branch. If people want to rename their branches, fine... but don't force it on everyone esle. Oct 28 '20 at 14:45
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This is my comment, more fleshed out

I feel a simple script by the administrator can do the entire job.

I respectfully disagree here. Something "simple" would be a statement like the below:

UPDATE dbo.Posts SET Body = REPLACE(Body,'master','main');

This would very likely break the validity of 1000's (if not 10,000's) of answers and questions. Just because something references master doesn't mean that that application have changed their processes. Take the RDBMS that Stack Overflow uses, SQL Server, which currently still uses master as one of the system database names. I (honestly) don't expect that to change any time soon as it would be a huge breaking change.

Speaking of SQL Server, with the above it would need to at least maintain the casing, and that is (honestly) not very simple in SQL Server without CLR functions; it sucks at string manipulation.

To be able to do something like this, you would need to analyse the specific snippet the "offending" word appears in (such as "master", "slave", "white list"), ensure that changing "offending" words does not break the existing code example for the language it is specific for (and version if relevant), and then correct it to the relevant new name (such as "parent", "child" and "green list"/"allow list"). That would be a incredibly huge undertaking.

At best, changing existing posts to conform with the new terms would need to happen on a case by case analysis for each post; let's be real, that's never going to happen.

If you are personally offended by the posts use of words that can be misinterpreted then submit an edit request on the post, but ensure it does not break that code. For example, changing code like EXEC master.sys.sp_executesql @SQL; to main.sys.sp_executesql @SQL; would break the code. That means you need to do (significant) due diligence before you make that edit.

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  • And now to the more interesting questions if manual edits from master to whatever are actually a good idea.
    – Trilarion
    Oct 27 '20 at 21:50

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