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Since it's deleted, you need a least 10k reputation to access it.

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3637668/why-are-scripting-languages-e-g-perl-python-ruby-not-suitable-as-shell-lang

I think it's a legitimate question about language design, which is on-topic. How the heck is that "not constructive"? IMHO it should not only be undeleted, but also reopened.


OK, I guess it's deemed off-topic by the community, but the content there is nevertheless helpful to interested people. So instead of undeletion, what about a historical lock?

Questions can be historically locked when:

  1. The post does not meet the current guidelines for a good, on-topic question, and
  2. The post is stellar, in spite of its off-topic nature, and
  3. There are a large number of views, upvotes and inbound links on the post, and
  4. The post is contentious; e.g., it has been closed and reopened at least once, or deleted and undeleted at least once.
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  • ^^ Let alone that 14(!) answers clearly indicate that as well. – πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 25 '20 at 10:38
  • @MartijnPieters As OP explained in the last paragraph, these "multiple questions" all fall under the umbrella of Can a programming language that is suitable for design of complex systems be at the same time able to express useful one-liners that can access the file system or control jobs? – nalzok Oct 25 '20 at 10:39
  • @πάνταῥεῖ That's unsurprising for a question with 335 upvotes I guess. – nalzok Oct 25 '20 at 10:40
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    @nalzok which shows that it is not a focused question. The top answer is very long, trying too address all the points raised. It is a classically too broad question, requiring a book to answer. – Martijn Pieters Oct 25 '20 at 10:40
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    @nalzok Unless it's worth to receive a historical lock, it should be deleted as too broad. All of those answers cannot give a clear and concise reasoning. – πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 25 '20 at 10:42
  • Cross duplkicate: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/318329/… – πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 25 '20 at 10:45
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    I would be in favor of a historical lock. I'm just not sure that it makes sense at this point, if no one has missed it in the past 6 years... – Cody Gray Oct 25 '20 at 10:53
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    @CodyGray Probably no one has missed it because deleted questions are not really discoverable (not reachable via site search, and search engines will phase it out due to inaccessibility)? For the record, I accidentally found this question in an old forum thread. – nalzok Oct 25 '20 at 11:00
  • I like the idea of an historical lock because I don't like seeing posts with immense effort put into them (which this sounds to be) go by the wayside. – zcoop98 Oct 26 '20 at 15:02
  • This isn't a duplicate of some other question having the same fate. Users need to be able to propose the undeletion and/or application of a historical lock to questions. That doesn't make them duplicates of some other time when someone else did that for some other question. – Cody Gray Oct 26 '20 at 21:40
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It wasn’t closed because of the subject area. That question is just way too broad:

  • it asks for general design principles surrounding whole classes of languages

  • It asks for open-ended lists:

    I am asking about the features of the shell language versus that of scripting languages.

  • It throws in a request for recommendations:

    The reason of this question is that I am hoping to develop a language usable in both. If you know of such a language, please post it as well.

The answers reflect this; they all address different aspects with the top answer a veritable essay, starting with a list of feature differences, followed with a case study of Powershell, breaking it down to address 5 different points, and closing it off with a list of recommended languages to look at.

In short, if a question requires a whole book to properly answer, it is not suitable for this site.

Was it worth deleting? It was deleted 6 years ago and no one seems to have missed it until now, so I’m not inclined to undelete it again. Great questions generally are referenced from all over the internet, and their deletion is noticed quite quickly. Great questions have people care about them and miss them when they are gone. There were no flags on that post asking for undeletion, nor are there any posts either on this Meta or on Meta.SE asking what happened to it.

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    "no one seems to have missed it until now" is a bit of a strange argument. Only a small percentage of users can see it. I expect even less can even find it, as I understand it's not even searchable, but requires a direct link. How do you know that everyone else didn't "miss it"? – Scratte Oct 25 '20 at 11:01
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    @Scratte great questions generally are referenced from all over the internet, and their deletion is noticed quite quickly. Good questions have people care about them and miss them when they are gone. There were no flags on that post asking for undeletion. There were no posts on this Meta or on Meta.SE asking what happened to it. I looked. – Martijn Pieters Oct 25 '20 at 11:04

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