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From the licensing page:

Content contributed on or after 2018-05-02 (UTC) is distributed under the terms of CC BY-SA 4.0.

When I looked on the Creative-Commons page describing the license, I found the following:

ShareAlike — If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you must distribute your contributions under the same license as the original.

In the list of compatible licenses, BY-SA, ported versions of it, free art license and GPLv3 are allowed:

  • BY-SA 4.0, or a later version of the BY-SA license.
  • Ported versions of the BY-SA license (if any), version 4.0 or later
  • A license designated as a “BY-SA Compatible License” as defined in BY-SA 4.0.
    • Free Art License: The Free Art license 1.3 was declared a “BY-SA–Compatible License” for version 4.0 on 21 October 2014. See the full analysis and comparison for more information.
    • GPLv3: The GNU General Public License version 3 was declared a “BY-SA–Compatible License” for version 4.0 on 8 October 2015. Note that compatibility with the GPLv3 is one-way only, which means you may license your contributions to adaptations of BY-SA 4.0 materials under GPLv3, but you may not license your contributions to adaptations of GPLv3 projects under BY-SA 4.0. Other special considerations apply. See the full analysis and comparison for more information.

I saw this post asking if the CC BY-SA license

According to Stack Overflow TOS section 6 code posted on StackOverflow falls under CC-BY-SA, now CC BY-SA 4.0 (International) (was CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported according to this related question and this post by Sebastian Baltes).

As of this answer, it seems that anyone using code from stackoverflow needs to license it in one of the few licenses defined.

I also found this post.

So, do I need to license my code with one of those licenses if I use code parts from stackoverflow or is attribution sufficient?

Does this still apply if I just copy the idea of how the code works and reimplement it?

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