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I asked a question on meta on 02-Jan-2020 which is now deleted by Roomba. Following is the screenshot:

Screenshot of old meta post

At that time (31-Dec-2019), the time difference between the two downvotes was 7 seconds.

Today, I again received two downvotes (one on each), on the same two questions within a very small time interval. Time difference today is 27 seconds.

Screenshot of today's downvotes

Now, looking at comments on deleted meta post, this can not be called serial downvoting. I do not have any evidence for it to consider targeted downvoting either.

One of the comments on the deleted meta post suggests this might be for cleanup:

It is possible that this was same user, but intent was not necessarily malicious. Both posts are immediately visible on your profile. Both posts are self answered questions that are probably not very helpful for the future. I am inclined to think that downvotes were cast as part of cleanup effort. Somehow someone found one of your posts by accident and then took a peek at your other posts. – Dalija Prasnikar

Well, cleanup looks most possible reason.

Other possible reason is "just a coincidence". Following is the part of one of my comment on deleted meta post:

SO is huge, co-incidences may happen. That also might be the case with me. – Amit Joshi

But, I am really surprised looking at the same coincidence with same two questions with similar (very short) time difference pattern.

That made me think, is this a misuse of sockpuppet?

Anyway, I cannot produce an evidence for anything of this. That is why I avoided to tag this as this time. The best way is to just neglect it and go on.


Two more downvotes yesterday (15-Mar-2021) with similar pattern. Time difference is 88 seconds.

Screenshot of 15-Mar-2021 downvotes

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    It is all speculation but maybe it is due to self-answering? I know there are some users that get seriously upset if you solve your own problems .... – rene Oct 19 '20 at 14:04
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    similar question at MSE: Spiteful downvoting? Two fast DVs to my unrelated posts. I recall receiving such "doubles" and if memory serves even cast them myself a while ago (dropped it because it felt useless and boring). The idea I think is to let the target user notice that somebody is unhappy about them without triggering reversal script – gnat Oct 19 '20 at 14:05
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    @gnat and posting on Meta then reveals that you "got" the message. – rene Oct 19 '20 at 14:08
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    are you doing some curation on the site? closing, flaging, commenting bad asnwers, etc? if so then you have a reason. I have accepted that reason since too long now. – Temani Afif Oct 19 '20 at 14:08
  • @TemaniAfif: Yes; but I am doing it on entirely different tags. Not the tags where the DVs cast. Anyway, you made a point. – Amit Joshi Oct 19 '20 at 14:11
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    Alas, there is little to be done here other than seeing if you can improve the posts. Posts with a low score are a good target for users feeling that they lack revenge. It could well have been someone else doing the second stream of downvotes, curation does bring this kind of negative attention. If only <redacted>. – E_net4 the downvoter Oct 19 '20 at 14:11
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    @AmitJoshi it doesn't matter the tags, users will randomly select some of your questions since downvoting a quesiton cost nothing and making only 2 downvotes will not trigger the serial voting algorithm (yes, I am used to this kind of things ;) ) – Temani Afif Oct 19 '20 at 14:14
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    It's certainly interesting but nothing more. We don't have enough data to make any kind of assumptions and neither can the system. It could be a coincidence, maybe the posts are linked in some way, maybe these questions are showing in search results and are not useful, or maybe someone was really mad with you and downvoted your 2 lowest scoring questions. – Dharman Oct 19 '20 at 15:08
  • I doubt it was done as part of curation efforts. Although it has happened multiple times to me that when doing some cleanup I encountered and had to downvote posts by the same user at the same time. This kind of thing happens. Unless there is a bigger pattern it's difficult to say that these are not legitimate votes. – Dharman Oct 19 '20 at 15:09
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    Self answering is unfortunately misunderstood by many (due to reputation points envy? Due to too many users using Stack Overflow as a forum?). It is best to leave a comment on the self answer to this effect (also occupying the important spot of the first comment which sets the tone for the rest of the comments). The comment could contain a quote from the canonical (FAQ on meta? Help page?) and the link for the quote. It is best to post it a few seconds after the answer (prepared in advance), but it can also be done after the fact. – Peter Mortensen Oct 19 '20 at 16:05
  • Your previous post was closed as a duplicate of this, which has an answer recommending you "flag a post & ask a moderator to have a look", and someone left a comment saying something similar on your post. That is what you should do, if you haven't already, and there isn't really much else you can do (unless you wish to point out that mods are mishandling such flags). Flagging and posting on Meta serves different purposes and this belongs firmly on the flagging side. – Bernhard Barker Oct 19 '20 at 18:44
  • There's an FAQ post on serial voting on Meta SE featuring a "What if I think I'm the victim of voting fraud?" section. – Bernhard Barker Oct 19 '20 at 18:52
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Is this serial/targeted/cleanup downvoting or just a coincidence (again)? Or is this a misuse of a sockpuppet?

There's no way to know. It could be any of the above, or something entirely different.

There's no need to infer a sock puppet, because the votes are on two different posts. In my experience two votes from the same user, even in a very short amount of time, is not enough to trigger the serial-voting script to reverse the votes. It doesn't take a second user account to cast two votes on two different posts without being reversed.

I suspect that most likely, it's a user disgruntled with some action of yours. Sadly, revenge voting is a thing, and Stack Overflow's main "solution" to it is to make the cost of downvotes insignificant relative to the benefit of upvotes. The nightly script addresses only the most egregious examples.

For what it's worth, there is also no real solution to serial up-voting, which is also a thing. I can't prove that I've been the target of either, but I strongly suspect that I've been the target of both over the years. This sort of thing happens, and as I keep having to remind myself, none of it really matters much in the long run. It's not worth worrying about, or even trying to figure out.

One more thing: the official advice, if you suspect serial voting, is to flag a post with a custom flag for a moderator. In theory, that's fine. But my experience has been that in practice this accomplishes nothing. Moderators seem reluctant to drag Stack Exchange employees into the situation, and they apparently are the only people who can actually see who has voted for what and when to evaluate a specific case on that basis, and to modify any voting activity.

In practice, raising a flag for the serial voting is probably only a useful thing to do when you feel that you are seeing an extended pattern of serial voting, e.g. serial voting that flies just under the daily-script radar and which goes on for several days repeatedly, at least.

For the occasional temper-tantrum, there really isn't much else to do than to let it go.

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    i think we should add to check if this is a serial downvte, when the time gap between dwnnvotes are to short, to read the answer/question. 2 downsvtes is not enough to get noticed,by the system – nbk Oct 19 '20 at 20:40
  • @nbk: "when the time gap between dwnnvotes are to short, to read the answer/question" -- Now and then, I think about additions that could be made to the daily script, but wind up giving up. There always seems to be a potential unintended consequence that counter-balances seemingly-good ideas. E.g. such as using the time between votes, unfortunately there's no requirement that a vote be made immediately after reading a post. So a person could review more than one post, and then go back and vote on them all. And there are legitimate scenarios ... – Peter Duniho Oct 19 '20 at 21:34
  • ... that might involve two quick votes. E.g., sometimes a person is seeking help for a problem that has two or more discrete components, related enough that the same user might have provided two different posts on the same topic, and only after reviewing all the posts a user might choose to cast a vote on both posts, one right after another. This can even happen with three or more...at some point, that would be reversed by the daily script. It seems that the policy choice is that it's likely enough to see two such votes, but rare enough for three or more, that two votes are left alone. – Peter Duniho Oct 19 '20 at 21:35
  • Bottom line: even when you can interview a person, it can be exceedingly difficult to judge motive, and when all you have to go on is the actual voting record, it's basically impossible. The policy seems set to focus on blatantly irregular scenarios, and leave alone anything remotely plausible. – Peter Duniho Oct 19 '20 at 21:37
  • I have them occasionally where i got my highest Answers downvoted in 56 seconds. One for php from 2016 and a fairly new one in perl, the only thing in common that they are in my votes among the highest and 1 go so far. that this was a serial downvoter that didn't like something or other. Why he only downvoted 2 answers, quite simple he knows that the system don't recognizes it. – nbk Oct 19 '20 at 22:00
  • Additional data points should always be useful to someone trying to detect things. Much like asking questions on Stack Overflow, it's about solving your immediate problem, but also helping others with the same problem. Although that's not to say the data would get to where it needs to go to be useful, nor that it would necessarily make sense to do something about any given case. – Bernhard Barker Oct 19 '20 at 22:01
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    Notes: A) The official guidance is to wait 24 to 48+ hours after the serial/targeted voting and prior to flagging in order to allow the automatic reversal script to either revert it, or demonstrate that it's not going to. B) Moderators are happy to escalate voting irregularities to CMs, but there needs to be a pattern that reasonably indicates something other than random chance. Two downvotes that happen to be close together in time, if that's the only indication (potential indications also including comments, other actions, etc.), really isn't much of a pattern. (continued) – Makyen Oct 19 '20 at 22:15
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    (continued) However, votes don't necessarily need to be close together in time in order to be targeted voting/revenge downvoting. The pattern could be spread out over months, or even years. C) At times, the CM backlog can be very long, as in many months (e.g. it was 9+ months earlier this year (2020)), which can easily make it feel like nothing happened as a result of your flag. A concentrated effort on the part of the CMs and others recently dramatically reduced the backlog to much more reasonable timeframes (i.e. down to weeks, or days in some cases). (continued) – Makyen Oct 19 '20 at 22:15
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    (continued) D) We don't provide updates as to the status of escalations, nor do we tell you about any actions we may have taken with respect to other people. A lack of information is likely to contribute to a feeling that nothing happens.E) We, or the CMs, may well look at more of the voting involved in your account than just the serial downvoting the flag is raised for. This may result in other serial/targeted downvoting, or upvoting, being reversed. F) There may be other things affecting the situation, what, if any, we won't disclose to you. – Makyen Oct 19 '20 at 22:15

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