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In the past couple of days, I've seen a moderator closing a lot of questions that in my opinion shouldn't be closed at all, and others that should be closed with a different reason.

I have flagged one such question with a couple of examples of other questions that were wrongfully closed, but the mod handling the flag sent me to Meta.

There are many more than the ones I mentioned in the flag message, a quick sample showed that about half of recent closures by this moderator were objectively wrong. I can produce a list, but don't want to yet, as I want to wait for some moderator or staff to reply.

So here's the question: other than voting to reopen all those questions, and there are too many to do that, what else can I do?

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  • @Cerbrus I found that necessary because I expected a lot of backlash if I didn't explain myself well enough, because again, how dare I question a moderator's actions (let's face it, most Meta questions blaming a mod are wrong; I might be as well). I have trimmed the question, thanks for your suggestions. Let's see where it goes from here. – CodeCaster Sep 14 '20 at 15:48
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    The problem with most meta questions blaming the mods is that they're filled with waay too much personal opinion, which results in a backlash... Considering my answer no longer applies to the question any more, imma remove it. I think the question is much clearer now, and more neutrally worded. – Cerbrus Sep 14 '20 at 15:53
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    @CodeCaster FWIW, with the changes, this is a huge improvement, focus has been taken away from the situation and the question is much clearer, it's a simple "How do I proceed if I think a mod is closing questions incorrectly?", no noise, the precise amount of background needed, just a simple "Here's my problem, what do I do?" – Nick Sep 14 '20 at 15:54
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    Per the flags and rewrite, I removed most of the comments related to the original version. I now return you to your regularly scheduled Meta Show, already in progress – Machavity Sep 14 '20 at 18:23
  • "..what else can I do?" You can always Twitter about it. :) (if nothing else works for you) In case you go to Meta, a statistics about how many of the closed questions got reopened later (compared to how many usually get reopened) might be convincing. After all moderators should know the close reasons especially well, so one would expect an equal or higher than average success (=remains closed) rate of closures done by moderators for a sufficiently large number of trials. – Trilarion Sep 15 '20 at 8:12
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    @Trilarion It is my impression that most users think a post closure is the end of the post. Not sure how measuring how many gets reopened is a good indicator. It's also my impression that it's a lot easier to get an OK post closed, than to get it reopened. – Scratte Sep 15 '20 at 8:31
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    it would be useful to know how many closures you sampled, to gain a better understanding on how reliable would it be to extrapolate your evaluation to other closures – gnat Sep 15 '20 at 12:52
  • @gnat I have no interest in continuing that particular discussion in public. – CodeCaster Sep 15 '20 at 12:58
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    It may actually be useful to know the moderator or some of the questions in this case because recently one moderator has been closing an inordinate amount of questions in the review queue. This may be a case of fatigue causing mistakes/poor judgement (not unlike oxygen deprivation) in a scenario where there are no other people providing a second opinion, if you are referring to that moderator. Prior to doing ~1000 reviews at a time the past several days, that moderator did not have that many close vote reviews under their belt (maybe a couple thousand). – TylerH Sep 15 '20 at 14:55
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In brief

In case of disagreement with moderator actions, your options are (and in my opinion should be used in this order, which luckily matches your own described trajectory):

  • Custom moderator flag
  • Post on meta
  • Use the contact form to elevate your case to SO employees.

Note: In the specific case of voting, it's not likely that any of this will have any direct effect, since voting is a personal privilege that can't be removed without suspending the user.


Longer take on the situation

Moderators are not supposed to stop casting close and reopen votes (or any other kind of vote) when they acquire their diamond. That wouldn't be good for curation.

It's expected that they continue casting their votes according to their interpretation of site rules, consensus and policies.

Even when one disagrees with their voting actions, they are still fully entitled to those actions. So as long as there is no blatant abuse of powers, there is little to contest, in the same way we cannot contest regular users votes of any kind with any other tool but our own votes (putting aside voting irregularities).

Moderators will generally abstain from engaging in closing-reopening wars, for example, despite having unlimited votes at their disposal. They'll cast their votes according to their judgement and then leave it up to the community to sort it out. I imagine there will be cases where they cast more than one close/reopen vote, if they deem the circumstances exceptional enough, but that's not the norm.

If you believe a moderator is flat out wrong, acting in a way that's completely contradicts either site's rules, moderation precedent or community consensus; you can bring specific cases to meta, to try to create a firmer consensus around the issues you perceive. Sometimes as a result of this a moderator may decide to change their approach, or other moderators may decide to intervene in the matter.

But maybe the result of the question is not so clear-cut, and a consensus is not built that firmly contradicts the moderator actions (or maybe even supports them); so while this path may not guarantee to get you the results you believe are correct, one way or another it may help to set your expectations for the future.

If, on the other hand, you believe this is simply a case of moderator abuse, don't believe the community equipped to handle it, your options are:

  • Flag again for mod attention (which you tried, and didn't work, so that avenue is already closed for you on this particular instance)

  • Use the contact-form to ask the CM team to review the case.

Again, neither of these options is guaranteed to get you the outcome you desire; and in the end, I think it is good to remember that other users (regular users and moderators alike) are free to vote according to what they think is best for the site, and that very few restrictions are put to that right.

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    I agree with a lot from your answer, thanks. I don't agree with the "free to vote" part however; there are very explicit and clear rules for determining whether a question should be closed. If many closed questions don't match any written rule that would warrant closure, that indicates a problem to me. It could be that the close-voter in question doesn't like the question, or its formatting, or its contents; or its lack of effort, or its subject, or the pressure on the close vote queue, but neither of those are a reason to close on-topic question. So onto the contact form it is, thanks. – CodeCaster Sep 14 '20 at 12:30
  • @CodeCaster Just a heads up, while the contact form can take 24hrs to get a response, I do recall reading on MSE (unfortunately can't find the source right now as it was in a comment) that response times are longer than usual right now, so it may take a week or two to get a response, depending on how they choose to respond. – Nick Sep 14 '20 at 12:39
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    @Nick I assumed it'd take 6-8 units of time anyway, thanks. – CodeCaster Sep 14 '20 at 12:42
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    @CodeCaster 'there are very explicit and clear rules for determining whether a question should be closed', yes, well, often I just pick some close reason at random. SO will never list appropriate close reasons for many bad questions, ('cos 'feelings', 'welcoming' etc), so I just pick one that exists. – Martin James Sep 14 '20 at 18:17
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    @Martin I do hope that this and my past contributions here on Meta would show that I vehemently agree with your sentiment: many posts that are on the site, shouldn't. However, users should not use tools at their disposal to do so against the rules, because that is anarchy. Let alone a mod doing so. If a majority agrees the rules should be changed, then fight for that. Or start a new community, I'll wait. – CodeCaster Sep 14 '20 at 21:21
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I can produce a list, but don't want to yet, as I want to wait for some moderator or staff to reply.

You'll have to in any case because without the details we or anyone else can hardly judge the situation nearly as good as necessary.

The goal should be that erroneous curation actions are minimized. Typically I would expect the exception handlers to deal with it, even if the subject is another moderator. But it might make sense to establish on meta the nature of the failure first. Wrong close reasons aren't that uncommon and often do not have large impacts, the question would be closed anyway only the given guidance is a bit wrong. That's why we require 3 close votes and required 5 in the past.

Just make sure that you have a watertight case, that list should contain clear cases. Double check that it's not just a difference of opinions.

Also don't make it about the person but about the minimization of curation mistakes. Maybe the problem can be generalized. Only if you don't hear from the moderators or if the errors continue, pose a direct question.

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