78

This is the triage/27142715 result: “The consensus is: this post Looks OK.”

enter image description here

Afterward, it got closed due to a lack of focus.

I understood the question fully (I don't think it lacks focus) and if the wanted solution was in python I would probably answer it. In fact, someone did answer it.

In my opinion, it's not the best question ever asked, but it's an average question that is completely answerable.

Full disclosure: This is not my first review ban, but I would argue that most, if not all my past bans where due to lack of experience and not lack of focus

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    Looks to be a work request with no attempt or code whatsoever. Doesn't look OK to me – CertainPerformance Sep 13 at 7:56
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    Usually I agree, but when someone is asking for a very simple code snippet, when the answer is a one liner and the explanation is detailed with an example, I believe it's a legit question and not a 'work request' – ofirule Sep 13 at 8:10
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    It’s too basic and poorly scoped to be Ok. Depending on their actual constraints a different zillion dupes would apply. – yivi Sep 13 at 8:10
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    I pretty much agrees with @yivi , but I haven't seen his argument as something to look for in the docs, which makes it an opinion and not a strict rule, and I try to follow the rules and not my opinion when reviewing. If someone will point me to someplace in the docs with relevance it would be great and a prefect answer to the question/discussion. – ofirule Sep 13 at 10:54
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    I guess that @gnat was leading me to this answer meta.stackoverflow.com/a/257874 , correct me if I am wrong, and if that is the case a more precise closing reason should be present to everyone, the guy who asked the question and the reviewers – ofirule Sep 13 at 13:22
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    Does this answer your question? Is this "Gimme-teh-Codez" Question suitable for a Triage Audit? – ggorlen Sep 13 at 15:34
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    @ofirule Lacks effort has never been a close reason, as demonstrated by this answer. – 10 Rep Sep 13 at 23:37
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    The question was closed not because it didn't show any code/effort. That is not a reason to close a question. This question was closed because it lacked clarity/focus. As it was written the requirements were unclear and without guessing it would be impossible to provide correct answer. Even if OP were to edit the question then it would probably be a duplicate. However, to know that this question was unsalvagable you require some domain knowledge. – Dharman Sep 14 at 14:08
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    Also related : Should “Give me a regex that does X” questions be closed?. Answer : YES. – J... Sep 14 at 15:06
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    I think there's some wiggle room on this one. The question needed closing, but there's something of a case to be made it could be left open. So I'll review unban you this once since you did come to Meta to ask why. Just be aware the ban prior to this one was from failed reviews, and your next ban is 64 days if you're not careful. – Machavity Sep 14 at 15:21
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    @Lankymart That would be saying that there is consensus. Where is this consensus? – Scratte Sep 14 at 17:18
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    @Lankymart A fair argument, but the key thing here is we want people to pay attention to the review process. If they had picked "Requires Editing" they would get no sympathy from me, but in this case we have a marginally closable question and they (and a number of people) disagreed. I want to make sure people see the Meta process works and that they can learn from their mistakes The risk here is minimal. If they make another review mistake their next ban will be far more severe. – Machavity Sep 14 at 17:28
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    @Lankymart I've been here just long enough to read the most upvoted Answer on this post. And the next one too.. and the next one.. It seems that those posts indicate that the choice in Triage wasn't wrong. Does it matter if my account if from today? – Scratte Sep 14 at 17:43
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    You have my sympathy. I've completely given up taking part in the review process on StackOverflow; it's just too discouraging. You're fighting against too many people who always know best, even though in your specialist field they actually know nothing. – Michael Kay Sep 15 at 9:05
197

"How do I do [something]" is a perfectly legitimate question to ask!

I've noticed that folks are bringing up the "lacks effort" close reason again. "Lacks effort" has never been a legitimate reason to close a question, here or on any other Stack Exchange site.

"What have you tried" does not mean "demonstrate effort;" it means "Show us how you've attempted to solve the problem so that we have some idea of your level of expertise, and so that we don't have to revisit all of the same ways you've tried to solve the problem before." It's how we ask for clarity.

"What have you tried" doesn't really apply to "how do I do something" questions. By definition, if someone is asking "how to," they don't know how. Taking random actions is seldom a good way to solve problems. Sometimes, all folks need is a nudge in the right direction.

If someone is asking for free consulting advice or extended tutoring, your remedy is to vote to close as "too broad" (that's the "needs more focus" reason). But if you're offended by lack of effort on a simple, straightforward "how to" question, your remedy is simply to move on.

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    Yes, this, thanks. If you find a question lazy, you downvote it. That's not a reason to close it. – CodeCaster Sep 13 at 15:09
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    By definition, if someone is asking "how to," they don't know how. Well, they should at least try and share their attempt or research. There's never any excuse for no effort. – ggorlen Sep 13 at 15:29
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    @ggorlen I think it is difficult to always estimate the effort by looking at the question. The poster may have spent a considerable amount of time trying to find a solution to the problem. Is he or she required to add a sentence stating how much time was invested? Maybe the poster has tried different approaches that all seem to be absolute dead ends. Adding a list of dead end approaches does not necessarily add quality to the question. I don't think it is appropriate to close a question, based on the assumption the poster is lazy (this itself also is very opinionated). – MBT Sep 13 at 16:22
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    Yes, it's about adding quality to the post to bring it up to the site's standards. "I spent 3 days bashing my face on the keyboard and nothing worked" clearly adds nothing to the post and isn't what I'm referring to. There are many possible scenarios but focusing on the question at hand, an attempt would clearly help. "How can I do this in PHP?" is essentially a "where to I begin?"/"can someone help me?"/"gimme teh codez" question, particularly for a vague regex question like this. – ggorlen Sep 13 at 17:45
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    Also, there's no assumption on my part that the poster is lazy. I'm looking empirically at what's been stated in the post only and evaluating it based on the site standards for effort. I can't assume a question is on topic based on something that wasn't written in it. – ggorlen Sep 13 at 17:52
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    This is what is lacking on Stack Overflow. We need more of this. Much much more! What we certainly do not need is moderators to review suspend users that share this opinion. – Scratte Sep 13 at 20:13
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    I respectfully disagree. SO works best when there is a specific problem to be solved, not just an open ended question. You tried something, you got stuck, now let's solve the problem. You can't get stuck at the start. You can at least google, or you can try to break down your goal into pieces and explain where you got stuck in one of those pieces. But simply "I want to do X and I don't know where to begin" is not helpful. – Steve Bennett Sep 14 at 6:15
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    As pointed by @CodeCaster the tooltip of downvote of a question is explicit enough I think: "This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful" – β.εηοιτ.βε Sep 14 at 10:33
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    @MBT “Maybe the poster has tried different approaches that all seem to be absolute dead ends. Adding a list of dead end approaches does not necessarily add quality to the question.” - but it prevents people from listing the same approaches again, only to then have the poster go, “nah, tried that already, didn’t work because […]” – CBroe Sep 14 at 10:44
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    "If you find a question lazy, you downvote it." - Although the problem I find here is that many users who cast the initial downvote don't follow or return to the question to perhaps un-downvote (or even upvote) the question after it has been edited (in response to comments) to make it a better (or even "good") question. The downvote unfortunately often remains. @CodeCaster – MrWhite Sep 14 at 12:30
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    " "Lacks effort" has never been a legitimate reason to close a question, here or on any other Stack Exchange site" No, but the user must demonstrate a minimum of knowledge of the topic being discussed has been a legitimate close reason, before the quantity over quality era started. "What have you tried?" is a perfectly legitimate response to check if the OP has any knowledge at all, or if they are just another spoiled kid looking to have their homework done for them. Or if they are at all interested in getting an answer. – Lundin Sep 14 at 14:15
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    After the "minimum of knowledge" was removed as close reason, we were told use "too broad". – Lundin Sep 14 at 14:18
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    At some point a question just becomes pointless, though. Like Swimming SE fielding "Q : I need to get to the other side of a pool. I tried to cross but sank. Can someone help?". This really isn't productive for anyone to answer. – J... Sep 14 at 15:12
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    I always thought the "what have you tried" stuff was nonsense, no help to answerers, it just makes them skip the question when there's 8 pages of stuff that didn't work, or they don't read the question and post something that's already listed as "not working". Do you honestly want to read questions that take up a full monitor's worth of space? Let's be honest, SO is designed for quick, popular, easily searchable answers to quick questions... there's no way you'll get answers for hard questions without a hefty bounty. – jrh Sep 14 at 20:37
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    @jrh yes! I prefer half a monitor of stuff that the asker tried and didn't work, than hours of my time doing stuff that the asker tried and didn't work. I would spend at most 3 minutes reading an entire screen of stuff (at SO format), vs hours of wasted debugging sessions. – Braiam Sep 14 at 22:14
62

The question you linked has been closed with this reason:

Needs more focus - if your question has many valid answers (but no way to determine which - if any - are correct), then it probably needs to be more focused to be successful in our format.

And that does not apply to this question at all. It is asking one question, namely how to parse a query string.

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    You know that "Need mode focus" is code for "Lacks attempt" or "Lacks research effort", right? We just don't want new users to know that. It's best to keep them confused. Also, we stopped accepting simple and basic Questions because we prefer Google to point somewhere else. (warning: sarcasms may have been used here.) – Scratte Sep 13 at 9:52
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    @Scratte Google would still point them to SO, to one of the many duplicate questions about the same topic. If you want to answer "simple and basic" questions other and other again, then you might need to join a different site, with different goals and rules. – Tom Sep 13 at 14:30
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    @Tom Not every simple question has been asked yet here. Of course no more will on Stack Overflow. – Scratte Sep 13 at 20:09
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    @Tom the question should then be closed as a duplicate instead of "Needs more focus". – Haem Sep 14 at 6:28
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    @10Rep Arguing that "nobody will answer that" is a really poor excuse for closing a Question. And the "gimme teh codez"-reason is being used on almost any Question that doesn't have code. There are no other issues with these types of Questions. Arguing that it will only make more people ask them more is not valid. One user does not learn from someone else's experience. Stack grew from all those how-to Questions. Look at the Question the next time you find an Answer that you need. – Scratte Sep 14 at 6:34
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    @Scratte "Not every simple question has been asked yet here" - And yet, some have been asked far too many times. – Lankymart Sep 14 at 11:39
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    @Scratte Stack Overflow grew from those questions at a time when the only people answering them were providing high-quality answers. Nowadays, the shorter the question, the shorter and less topical the answers it is likely to achieve, because people trying to harvest rep points with bad answers are less likely to spend time reading longer more detailed questions. The end result is that such questions need to be closed in order to prevent them from becoming the cesspool of trash they're almost certain to end up as. Is it wrong, probably. Is it necessary, unfortunately. – Ian Kemp Sep 14 at 12:07
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    @IanKemp that terrifyingly sounds as "there is no rule to close questions I don't like, so I bend the rules to make them fit". And I don't say that lightly, you probably know that I don't like zero-research effort questions as well. – CodeCaster Sep 14 at 13:21
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    @CodeCaster The underlying problem is that SO's curator base numbers have not scaled with the new user numbers. That means fewer curators to moderate more content. That means those curators have less time to moderate content. That means those curators try to find ways to more effectively moderate content. That means those curators end up being harsher on questions than they would have in the past. That means Meta threads like this where curators argue with each other about what's right versus what's expedient, because Stack Exchange Inc. wins by dividing us instead of fixing their platform. – Ian Kemp Sep 14 at 14:17
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    @Ian I'm right there with you in that Stack Overflow has a worsening quality problem (which is also driving experts away), but I don't think we should abuse the tools we have to solve that problem on our own, in fact, I've just asked a question about this. – CodeCaster Sep 14 at 14:28
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    @Tom Here is a question you answered 6 years ago. stackoverflow.com/questions/25796637/parse-a-yaml-file/…. If you were to look at it now, would you close it? Mark it as too broad? Not enough focus because they are asking where to start? I don't know why we assume 0-research questions need to be immediately closed. If you look at this question now, almost 100k views. – Matt Sep 14 at 15:20
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    @Matt Stack Overflow today is not the Stack Overflow of half a decade ago. We can't use those past behaviours as a yardstick for how we curate content today, because the site has changed. So bringing up those past behaviours is not helpful, except as a study of how Stack Overflow could and should be if Stack Exchange Inc. had made better choices. – Ian Kemp Sep 14 at 15:32
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    @IanKemp I'm not even sure what your argument is. Are you saying that the question I linked would be alright then, but if asked today it would be closed? Completely ignoring that it seems to have attracted useful answers? I'm simply stating that the closers seem like they might be poor judges about what will eventually result in a good answer. – Matt Sep 14 at 15:51
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    @IanKemp Right, but you can guarantee no high-quality answers if you close all the questions. You can't find any pearls at all if you kill all the oysters. – Matt Sep 14 at 16:28
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30

This one is difficult to zero in on in its current state. Here's how I parsed it:

  • Are they trying to read parameters from the request? I think so, and I think they want to know the Laravel way to do that, based on the tags BUT
  • They only included the one sample, are they actually asking about substrings here? If they were trying to do something with regex they'd know it and would have mentioned it
  • Wait a minute, they didn't actually say where the string came from, it might not be a request they're parsing at all
  • Are they really using Laravel or was that just an extraneous tag?

... I'm all for showing folks how to do something, but there's not enough information there for me to write an answer (I don't want to come back and have to edit it a bunch if more info gets posted). I'm not sure what info is going to make sense for the OP ultimately, and it was open for 7 hours after being asked.

Can't say that it's a certain dupe because, well, we don't really know where they're getting that URL. If it's coming from a request that's one answer, if it's coming from a request and they are using Laravel it's another, but if it's coming from somewhere else another answer entirely might be appropriate.

I agree - we shouldn't shut down questions that have the information needed to provide an answer unless they're a clear cut dupe or plainly off-topic, but in this case (as someone who has spent a lot of time handling flags in PHP) this one really did lack focus, and wasn't responsive as people sought clarity.

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    I'm all for asking for more information, but at some point the asker needs to do due diligence before posting their question. Is there any plans in the asking wizard to address these issues? – Braiam Sep 14 at 22:12
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    @Braiam We don't really telegraph "don't go anywhere for 20 or so minutes if you can avoid it" or "check back frequently - folks might need clarification" when folks post their first few questions. I remember at some point actually trying that in an A/B test some years ago and it did have a slight effect. I'm assigning myself a thingy to dig that up once we're done clearing out a bunch of backlog stuff. – Tim Post Sep 15 at 11:37
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    @Braiam I mention that because said diligence can sort of be explained in a Wizard, but staying engaged with your first few questions and responding to comments generally sets you better off than reading all of our fine manuals (or not, as folks are usually in a hurry). – Tim Post Sep 15 at 11:41
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    Well balanced answer @TimPost – Lankymart Sep 15 at 13:42
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    Trying to improve the documentation, for it to not be read is a non starter Tim. At some point the asker has to sit down and stop being in a hurry asking their question. Remember, SO isn't a immediate help resource, in fact you can spend years before a question is answered, so why not use that time to make sure that the question is actually answerable – Braiam Sep 15 at 14:41
  • What bugs me is the close-fix-reopen cycle. I personally think it's a lot easier on the newbies to have a few hours leniency to fix the question. – Joshua Sep 15 at 14:49
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    @Joshua What annoys me more is when "newbies" post a question then don't reply and come back to check it until the next day or sometimes longer. – Lankymart Sep 15 at 15:51
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    Audits are supposed to be night and day; it should be very obvious what the answer is. The audits are targeted towards tripping up bots, not humans. – S.S. Anne Sep 15 at 19:26
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    @IanKemp Not constructive. Read the room. – forresthopkinsa Sep 15 at 21:01
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    @forresthopkinsa Stack Exchange Inc. has continually used "unwelcoming" as a blanket excuse to not do things that would improve the quality of questions asked on the Stack Overflow platform. Reminding everyone of this fact, and that their reasonable requests are thus almost certain to be rejected, to dissuade them from getting too excited and expending their valuable time on something that's unlikely to be implemented, is the opposite of "not constructive". – Ian Kemp Sep 16 at 8:26
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    @IanKemp And yet Tim Post, the public face of The Welcoming, responded quite differently to Braiam's comment than you did – forresthopkinsa Sep 16 at 18:04
  • @forresthopkinsa Last time I checked, I'm not a Stack Exchange Inc. employee with ability to directly influence the company's decisions. Did you have a point? – Ian Kemp Sep 16 at 22:51
  • I think my point was pretty clear. Moreover, glancing up at the comment in question, I think my point was heard. – forresthopkinsa Sep 19 at 21:15
13

Asking "How can I do this with PHP?" without showing any effort is perfectly acceptable on Stack Overflow.

However, this particular question lacked details/focus. It was not answerable at the current state. To properly judge this question you require domain expertise. I would argue that choosing the wrong reason in Triage should not lead to a suspension. This is not something you can judge from the Triage queue, which is supposed to help with quick categorization of questions.

The question was closed 3 times by Subject Matter Experts, the last time it was closed as a duplicate of the most relevant solution and then deleted. OP didn't edit the question with the details we asked for and the question was unsalvagable by us so deletion was the right choice of action.

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  • If you are required to be a SME in order to review the question, in a queue, then you should skip the review. If you select the wrong reason, and you are not a SME, then you should be held responsible for your choices. I disagree you have to be a SME to determine if the question has problems that can only be solved by the author. – Security Hound Sep 16 at 16:25
  • @SecurityHound Triage doesn't seem to the queue that requires Subject Matter Expertise (SME). Triage doesn't have filtering of tags at all. If one need to be an SME to review it, then filtering should be provided. – Scratte Sep 17 at 20:29
  • @Scratte - Which is exactly my point. The excuse that somebody must be a SME to determine the proper response in the Triage queue doesn't make sense. If you don't know the proper response, skip the review, and proceed to the next one. – Security Hound Sep 17 at 21:51
  • @SecurityHound The last bit of your sentence seems to contradict your first one. In Triage one would have to Skip the next 100 ones, not the next one. Which basically has the same result as not bothering to review at all. – Scratte Sep 17 at 22:00
  • @Scratte - Each review in Triage is independent from the previous one. One doesn't have to be a SME to perform Triage reviews, if the reviewer doesn't know what the correct action should be, they should just skip that particular individual review in the queue. – Security Hound Sep 17 at 22:09
  • @SecurityHound It almost sounds like you haven't done a lot of reviewing in that particular queue and/or are unaware of the suspensions resulting in picking a choice when one isn't an SME even when the choice seems obviously correct. – Scratte Sep 17 at 22:10
  • @Scratte - I have; – Security Hound Sep 17 at 23:11
10

There is an eternal war debate on what Stack Overflow is about.

On one side, people argue the Q&A format exists to build a knowledge bank in the form of answers. Questions exist to tease out the epic answers. You optimize for pearls, not sand.

On the other hand, people argue about the need to share the humanity and have sympathy. To help when it is needed. To help when it can be given.

Well, clearly the question is never going to provide an interesting answer. It doesn't help that the OP didn't demonstrate effort, which definitely sours opinions. You can see why it was closed.

But also, yes, you could help that person in one line. You would've helped exactly one person and never another. Notice by now at least 6 people spent time reviewing it, and a lot more on meta argued about it. Do you think this is a good investment?

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    When "Sand, meet pearl.", it's not the Question, it's the Answer on it that determines it it's a good Question. "No, it’s just a mundane grain of sand question that could have been asked by anyone at any time. What makes it remarkable is the incredible answer".. emphasis mine. This Question wasn't the low-quality un-answerable type, where one has to guess about it, nor was it lacking anything or prone to start opinionated discussion. What's the point of Lifejacket and Lifeboat? – Scratte Sep 14 at 8:30
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    @Scratte I realize it's about the answer. I don't believe extracting a query string (or a string search) at this day and age will generate an answer of any interest. It is reasonable to think so. – Passer By Sep 14 at 10:42
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    So then why do we halt editors when someone wants to translate a non-English question so that it can qualify for pearl-like answers? ...if it is about the answers, then let the questions happen. Despite the way this comment sounds, I think SO needs to close more, not less; and collapse A LOT of duplicate pages. – mickmackusa Sep 14 at 10:54
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    @Scratte Stack Overflow physically cannot be the repository of every single answer to every single programming question that has ever been asked, because the vast majority of those questions are extremely domain-specific (as per the one being discussed) and as such, have little value for anyone except the asker (as do their answers). Stack Overflow exists to teach a man to fish, not give him the fish. – Ian Kemp Sep 14 at 12:24
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    @Scratte the point is the question will be edited to make it more useful to others or a dup target will be assigned. People providing good answers (I mean detailed, in-depth with good examples) to poor questions (lack of detail, no clarity of the actual problem and what they have tried) are part of the problem. I have no issue answering poor questions but fix the question first or flag and move on. – Lankymart Sep 14 at 13:02
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    @IanKemp So the OP doesn't matter, because we are "building a repository of knowledge"? I don't understand at all why people close questions because they "are not reproducible". The OP asked a question, and answer it if you want! But why close it? Downvote if you dislike it, sure, but closing it is IMHO inappropriate because the OP asked the question to get help. Even if it is a valid question, people close it and send the message to new users that SO is unfriendly and just not worth it. – 10 Rep Sep 14 at 16:08
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    @10Rep If I post something that fails and I have a Sting instead of a String it's probably not going to help anyone else. But if I post and ask "How can I get my Windows cmd to print my String s = "🐴" as an emoji, not as ð??´ in java", that's going to get closed for lack of effort. If I post the long list of things I tried, it'll get downvoted for being boring and certainly never get an Answer anyway. And to be honest, nothing that I tried is of any value to the user that know how to do this or know that it's not possible to do it. – Scratte Sep 14 at 17:31
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    @10Rep You are campaigning for SO to be a help desk if you don't even argue against the idea that some questions never solicit useful answers. "SO is unfriendly and just not worth it", it's called community guidelines, and users ignoring them are quite immediately unwelcome, new or not. – Passer By Sep 14 at 18:25
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    Even if you're in the "To help when it is needed. To help when it can be given." camp, this question is unsalvageable because it can't be answered without much guesswork about what OP needs. The only hope for the "help everyone" folks is to spit out an answer and pray that it happens to match whatever OP's problem might be. – ggorlen Sep 14 at 19:18
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    @Scratte "If I post the long list of things I tried, it'll get downvoted for being boring and certainly never get an Answer anyway" I have no idea why you'd think that. Which of your questions was closed because it was "too boring"? – Voo Sep 14 at 19:43
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    @Voo I didn't say it would be closed :) Just downvoted and neglected. But I did post one. It got a few downvotes, no Answers. I deleted it. It was very well researched and as a result too long and boring. I'd rather not link it. Also see Stack Overflow fails to promote well-researched, well-written, but difficult questions – Scratte Sep 14 at 20:24
  • I'd categorize this in the former: It's a valid Q&A knowledge bank question. It's about a string search handling two results. This is a very common problem and reproducable. It has solid, verifiable solutions, and some solutions can be better than others. It's completely clear; it does not lack focus. If it's been asked before, it should be marked as duplicate. I'd say SO needs more questions like this, and the bulk of Q&As that get 300+ upvotes are similar to this. – Muz Sep 15 at 2:44
  • @PasserBy I completely agree, SO is not about feelings and about building a repository of knowledge. But if a question is not a duplicate, but at the same time not useful for later visitors, I feel it is incorrect to downvote and close such a question. – 10 Rep Sep 15 at 2:48
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    @Muz You have omitted one vital criterion in your list: is the problem posed by this question, and therefore its possible answers, something that will be broadly useful to many people? And in this case the answer is abjectly "no". Effectively, instead of being too broad to have well-defined answers, the question is too narrow for its answers to have use for anyone except the asker. It's not a knowledge base question, it's a helpdesk question, and as such it has no place here. – Ian Kemp Sep 15 at 10:25
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    @Muz So what you're saying is, it would make a good tutorial. Except... Stack Overflow isn't about writing tutorials, because there are millions of those available via Google search. – Ian Kemp Sep 16 at 10:14
7

It's perfectly fine asking "how to achieve X" questions. That are probably the most useful questions of all. The gotcha here is that that cannot be the entirety of the question. People that argue about closing these questions are usually the same people that would keep them open, the only difference between both are thousands upon thousands of terrible, uninteresting questions they have seen. Those kind of questions that kind of put off people answering.

The only reason the former group keeps visiting the site is for some kind of unicorn mildly interesting question that may appear once in a while, in the sea of crap that the firehose gives constantly and without rest.

But that's a very flowery abstract argument, we should instead use concrete examples, like my latest question (shameless plug incoming). The description of a "how-to question" applies squarely to that question. I don't know where to start. But unlike others of the same ilk, I know where not to start. I demonstrate command of the issue and show the drawback of the usual solutions. If I said that my question is a "how to solve this issue, but for these reason these solutions don't apply" it also would describe squarely that question.

Now, how to parse a string in PHP (or any language for that matter) is a problem solved by regex (ducks). Or by tokenization. The asker didn't show that it considered these solutions. I bet I can find several prior questions asking similar problems.

Now, people aren't looking for said work blindly, since "[visible] effort by itself is pointless, even counter-productive. But if a lack of effort leads you to ask a duplicate, unclear or overly-broad question, then you probably should have put more effort into avoiding those problems." (emphasis mine)

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6

In the end, it was discovered that the question has been answered before. This means it was "Unsalvageable" for the purpose of the triage review and none of the reviewers got it right. Indeed finding duplicates is not simple and it took quite a number of people and about 2 days to come to that conclusion. "Looks OK" would have been a kind of acceptable review answer under these circumstances. We cannot reasonably expect people to search extensively for possible duplicates while doing a single triage review. You did not wrongly review the question (unless it was such an obvious duplicate candidate, that every reviewer with tag knowledge should have immediately spotted it (none of the reviewers did)).

Since the question nevertheless was closed, the system determined wrongly that the review was done wrongly and gave you an unearned ban. (This would not have happened without other review errors from you.) To err is human and also not-human and that's why this is not a big thing. Just wait until the ban is over and then continue reviewing, taking into account your experiences from the other reviews.

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    The "system" was likely not the one suspending the user. It was most likely a manual moderator suspension. – Scratte Sep 14 at 13:22
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    Just because it is a duplicate doesn't mean it is "Unsalvagable" as that is for questions that can only be edited into shape by the OP not duplicates. – Joe W Sep 14 at 13:28
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    @JoeW You're wrong, "Unsalvagable" is for any question needing to be closed, this includes duplicates. – Tom Sep 14 at 13:29
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    @Joe Sidenote: Only the OP can make a duplicate not a duplicate. – yivi Sep 14 at 13:29
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    @Tom Duplicates are not a bad thing, they help other users find answers better as they have more ways to find the information they are looking for. A question being closed as a duplicate is different than a question being closed as unsalvagable. – Joe W Sep 14 at 13:48
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    "We cannot reasonably expect people to search for hours for possible duplicates", yes. But also, googling "url query php" takes 5 seconds. There is no way you wouldn't find the dupe unless you have no idea what the question is about, and still reviewed it. – Passer By Sep 14 at 13:52
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    @Tom What if "Unsalvageable" was changed to"Should be Closed"? When I see "Unsalvageable," I think "Objectively irredeemably awful question," and I'm not sure duplicates fit that description. – Calculuswhiz Sep 14 at 13:55
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    @Calculuswhiz "What if "Unsalvageable" was changed to"Should be Closed"?" It's more. It's: spam, rude/abusive, or should be closed. – Trilarion Sep 14 at 13:58
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    @PasserBy "googling "url query php" takes 5 seconds" Wasn't there even a high rep user that answered that question with a regex? Should I google every question that I review? If it was an obvious duplicate, why wasn't it immediately closed as such? We could say that this was an obvious duplicate but then all four reviewers got it wrong. – Trilarion Sep 14 at 14:06
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    @Trilarion Ok, that's fair. Though I still I feel like "Unsalvageable" isn't the right word to use here either. Hm... Is there a more fitting adjective we can use? Perhaps that's a question for the English SE. – Calculuswhiz Sep 14 at 14:09
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    It's also important to note that Stack Overflow's search for questions in the "close as duplicate" dialog is pure unmitigated ass. I always end up using Google anyway when I'm closing a question that I know has a canonical dupe (which the SO search never finds). – Ian Kemp Sep 14 at 15:25
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    @Darcythomas Either by doing (re)search of his/her own or by waiting until the question is closed as duplicate and then carefully reading the given duplicate target. – Trilarion Sep 14 at 21:45
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    @DarcyThomas "What if they have done research of their own, but come up empty handed?" Then show it. Include a description of the research in the question text. I don't mean "I searched for hours and didn't find anything." This is not a valid description. Instead tell what you searched and what you got and in what way that didn't help. "So they asked a question on SO." And that's okay if one does (re)search before and include a description of it in the question. Getting a question closed as duplicate then is not a shame, after all you get an answer. – Trilarion Sep 15 at 8:00
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    @DarcyThomas "If you don't know what regex is or how to drive a query parser then it is going to be a lot of dead ends." But you will learn a lot from it, maybe even what regex is or how to drive a query parser. It will be worth the time. Searching skills are more important than asking skills. Experts that answer the same questions repeatedly for free are kind of rare, much more often one will have to search an answer to a problem than simply asking for it. Every time you have a problem, you search for a solution first, only if you do not find one, you ask. You search much more often. – Trilarion Sep 15 at 8:04
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    @DarcyThomas I just made a small test. I went to the main page and opened the first 10 questions. 9 of them do not show any research effort. 3 or 4 of the 9 have a clear error message but apparently nobody bothered to google the error message and describe the result. The reputation of the askers is in the range of 1-97. 1 question does show research effort, the asker has a reputation of 132. My guess is that many askers currently do not put in research effort. The chance that they ask a duplicate question is relatively high. The way forward would require a change of attitude of askers. – Trilarion Sep 15 at 11:55
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This is an unanswerable, low-quality question by pretty much any metric. The correct triage choice should be "unsalvageable" (or "skip" if you don't feel you have sufficient domain knowledge to make this determination), not "requires editing" or "looks OK".

"Requires editing" does not apply to cases when "you know the question can only be made answerable with clarifications or additions from its author" ("unsalvageable"). See how does the triage review queue work?

Reasons why this question is off-topic/unsalvageable include:

  • The question isn't posed as a question about a specific error or non-working but concrete code, it's posed as a request for the solution to be delivered from scratch. Too broad.

  • Vague requirements. Comments for clarification are mandatory:

    • Why do they need to "remove all characters before the last instance of "http" in a string" instead of some other, probably better, way to achieve whatever OP is trying to achieve? See XY problem.
    • How should it be handled when "http" happens to appear in an unexpected place in the string? Is this a possible case?
    • Is the solution expected to handle arbitrary URLs or arbitrary input strings? If not, what exactly is the space of possible input that must be handled?

    Likely, once OP explains the problem they're really trying to solve, it's a dupe of the canonical parsing a query string with PHP, but it could well be a natural language processing task of extracting and manipulating URLs in a corpus or something else. As pointed out by Tim, the presence of the tag an extra layer of uncertainty and clashes with the question as posed.

    Although this question isn't tagged , it's fundamentally asking for string matching and suffers from the known quality issues associated with the regex tag, one of which is that string matching is often not the appropriate tool, symptomatic of lack of research.

    Without OP clarifying what they're trying to achieve, it's impossible to answer this question in its current form without making many assumptions. Unclear what you're asking.

  • No attempt or effort was demonstrated. This is not just to make OP leap a fence for our whims or prove they've suffered. Stating "I've googled for 3 days but nothing worked" isn't what's being requested and statements of the like are noise and can be removed. As George Stocker wrote, it's not really about effort. The point is that the attempt is constructive and helps clarify the specification, enabling answerers to work concretely and relevantly within a clearly-defined problem space.

    It's all too often that vague string matching questions are answered only to have OP point out a number of cases that the answer doesn't handle but were never mentioned. Endless back-and-forth ensues and everyone wastes time. These questions and the interactions they tend to provoke are seldom useful to future visitors and likely unhelpful to OP as well. Too broad and/or Needs MCVE.

See also:

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Most people in this discussion seem to believe that this question is not clear, but I believe it is perfectly clear. Distilled, it very clearly seeks a solution to "remove all characters before the final instance of substring B in string A". It is a clear question with a clear answer.

Is it the right question the person should have asked? Maybe, maybe not.

The absolute most frustrating experiences I have on SO are the times my question gets misdiagnosed as an XY Problem when I've been clear about my question. In so many of the cases I see, it basically lets the answerer feel smart and superior, while not really helping the asker at all. I find the answering style given here to be a very helpful way of dealing with perceived XY problems.

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    XY is only a very minor contributing factor. It's a heuristic that helps contribute to the sense that the question is unclear. If the question lacked some explanatory context but otherwise asked a concrete, clearly-defined question with a MCVE that happened to be an XY problem, I'd say it "Looks OK". The idea that people employ the XY problem label to feel superior is rather silly--we're looking to get clarity and actually help OP (and future visitors) with the underlying issue rather than provide a monkeypatch. Getting to the bottom of real problem X also helps identify a strong dupe. – ggorlen Sep 15 at 17:14
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    I do understand that as an answerer, people’s motivations are to help as much as possible by suggesting that they think they know what X truly is. But as an asker, the vast majority of the time when I get XY’d, the guess of what X must be is incorrect. So much so that I now try to guard against any XYing by explicitly stating all the related X’s that I am explicitly not asking about. – Ken Williams Sep 15 at 17:37
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    That's right, if you provide sufficient context the XY problem is mitigated. – ggorlen Sep 15 at 20:09
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    I face this issue all the time too. People don't read the question, jump to the example, lock it as a duplicate of the question that answers the example, but does not answer the question. – Muz Sep 16 at 10:06
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    What are you trying to solve is several times more important than what you are doing to solve it. – Braiam Sep 16 at 15:38

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