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Prompted by this answer, and in particular this comment.

For reference, section (4)(c)(iii) of CC BY-SA 3.0 reads:

to the extent reasonably practicable, the URI, if any, that Licensor specifies to be associated with the Work, unless such URI does not refer to the copyright notice or licensing information for the Work

A Stack Overflow moderator has interpreted and implemented compliance with the aforementioned section in the following manner:

(a) requiring comment(s) by user A that are edited into user B's post and subsequently deleted, to attribute that comment's content by user A in B's post
(b) inserting a link to the comment(s) that will imminently be deleted into the post in question

Example: https://stackoverflow.com/a/4236294/70345

My question is simple: is this the official Stack Overflow policy regarding the procedure to follow when editing comments into questions and/or answers? If not, what is the official policy? If one does not exist, can it be defined? Finally, can all users be made explicitly aware of this policy?

My reason for asking this is simple:

  • The vast majority of contributors to SO (including, until now, myself), are unaware of the need to attribute commenters when editing comments into posts, with the result that we aren't doing so. This means that CC BY-SA 3.0 is being violated on SO on a large scale.
  • Deleted comments can only be seen by moderators. A link to a deleted comment in a question or answer thus appears to link to nothing for non-moderators. This is confusing and detracts from the content of the question or answer.

Edit, replying to comments

Stack Overflow shouldn't give you any "official" response other than "follow the license". To give any other response opens them up to liability.

The official policy should be that all sections of the used license must be fully complied with at all times. The thing is that the company rarely to never gives legal advice. They are probably kind of afraid it might be used against them.

Stack Exchange Inc. chose to require its users to conform with CC BY-SA. Therefore, it follows that SE Inc. is responsible for informing its users how to ensure their actions conform with this license. After all, if a user fails to comply because they are not informed, this opens Stack Exchange Inc. up to legal liability - therefore it is also in SE Inc.'s best interests to elucidate a formal policy.

One could go a step further and say it is in SE Inc.'s best interests to modify their platform to ensure that editing of content cannot be performed in a CC BY-SA-violating manner... except we know their stance towards (not) updating their platform.

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  • I mean, I don't know about the official policy and stuff, but ethically it makes sense to give credit to a commenter if they help you. You don't ethically have to, but it would be nice. – 10 Rep Sep 5 at 22:29
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    I'm not sure how it can be confusing that a link goes to the post that the comment was on. It's the same with links to deleted Answers, that just goes to the Question the Answer was on. I've done this ever since I learned about the requirement for proper attribution, which was discussed at length during the entire licensing kerfuffle. I assume everything is licensed here, including chat. – Scratte Sep 5 at 23:02
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    The Terms Of Service are very clear that any and all Subscriber content is licensed under CC BY-SA [2.5, 3.0, or 4.0] (i.e. including comments). Stack Overflow doesn't have the right to change the license or release others from the obligations of specific portions of the license which was granted when the content was submitted. Stack Overflow shouldn't give you any "official" response other than "follow the license". To give any other response opens them up to liability. – Makyen Sep 5 at 23:49
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    I agree that a link to a deleted comment is rather pointless. However, attribution is mandatory, so giving explicit credit to the user who made the point/observation is critical. My personal opinion would be not to delete a comment that you thought is valuable enough to incorporate into a post, but I think I'm in the minority on that view. So, I'd just go with the link being pointless (not "reasonably practicable" in terms of the license, since the link is effectively dead). – Cody Gray Sep 5 at 23:50
  • Does the "unless such URI does not refer to the copyright notice or licensing information for the Work" provide a get-out-of-jail-free card? Does the comment URI refer to the copyright notice or licensing information for "the Work"? – Jonathan Leffler Sep 6 at 5:00
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    @JonathanLeffler The URI for a deleted comment will deposit you on the question or answer where the comment existed (specific example from the affected Q&A). The page on which it resides has the copyright notice at the bottom and links to the licensing page, which links to the CC BY-SA licenses. That's the same exact information that's provided for every post on SE. If that doesn't qualify, then it qualifies for no content on all of SE. – Makyen Sep 6 at 5:08
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    @Makyen Please consider answering this Question. I find your wording and points to be accurate and impossible to misunderstand. You could use the exact words of your comment(s) :) – Scratte Sep 6 at 7:27
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    Are the "vast majority" of users not crediting comments that they copy & paste? That's not been my experience. It seems to me to be completely obvious that, even just out of courtesy, you attribute text that you copy from others, and I've not encountered anyone blatantly not doing so (except those people who are already copy/pasting from third party websites and so forth) – Asteroids With Wings Sep 6 at 16:16
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    @Scratte And then link the comment? That would be cool. – 10 Rep Sep 6 at 16:29
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    Is this requirement even surprising? It's pretty clear from referencing that one needs to credit copied content, so I've been doing it for comments all along when including portions of a comment in an answer. See e.g. here, here, here, here, ... – dbc Sep 7 at 1:02
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    For reference, the complete text of CC-BY-SA 3.0 is here: creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/legalcode. – John Bollinger Sep 7 at 4:22
  • The official policy should be that all sections of the used license must be fully complied with at all times. The thing is that the company rarely to never gives legal advice. They are probably kind of afraid it might be used against them. – Trilarion Sep 7 at 7:32
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    Does this change between 3.0 and 4.0? After all, all the new content is under 4.0. – Mast Sep 7 at 9:49
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    Wouldn't this post better reside at MSE, as it applies network wide? – Luuklag Sep 7 at 11:50
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    "One could go a step further and say it is in SE Inc.'s best interests to modify their platform to ensure that editing of content cannot be performed in a CC BY-SA-violating manner... except we know their stance towards (not) updating their platform." You can't do that. You are looking for a technical solution to a legal problem which doesn't exist. Unless you have a magic oracle that tells you if an arbitrary input string is already licensed somewhere else and needs attribution, and if so, also magically knows if the user has permission to relicense under CC-BY-SA or not. – Polygnome Sep 10 at 12:16
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To the best of my knowledge, SO has never announced an official policy requiring the specific practices described in the question. Nor, to the best of my knowledge, has SO announced any other specific practices aimed at conforming with comments' licensing under such circumstances.

Certainly SO directs in a general sense, in various places, that proper attributions should be made when incorporating the works of others into SO posts. Moreover, to the extent -- unclear to me, who is not an attorney -- that it requires exercising rights granted by CC-BY-SA to incorporate part or all of a comment directly into the post with which it is associated, the person who does so only has such rights as long as they comply with their obligations under that license.

HOWEVER, interpreting the license to require including a URI in the case described seems a bit fraught. Here is a slightly expanded excerpt from CC-BY-SA 3.0, with markup by me:

You must [...] provide, reasonable to the medium or means You are utilizing: (i) the name of the Original Author (or pseudonym, if applicable) if supplied [...]; (iii) to the extent reasonably practicable, the URI, if any, that Licensor specifies to be associated with the Work, unless such URI does not refer to the copyright notice or licensing information for the Work;

Although in principle they could do so, comment authors never, in practice, specify any particular URI to be associated with their comments. On its face, then, it seems that clause (iii) does not apply to the situation in question.

Furthermore, a URI that identifies a particular comment specifically does not refer to a copyright notice or licensing information for it, because that is not part of the comment itself. Copyright and license information for a comment is conveyed only by one blanket notice in the footer of the overall page. For this reason, too, clause (iii) seems not to apply. Possibly one could argue that the overall page URI should be included, but that seems unreasonable for the medium (and therefore exempted).

Moreover, if we look at the apparent intent of the license in this area, it includes being sensitive to the medium or means, and its purpose is to ensure that the copyright notice and / or licensing information associated with the work are discoverable. Inserting a URI specific to the particular comment in question does not seem particularly reasonable when the comment is in the same document in which it is (re)used, and especially when it is not clear how a user should find or construct such a URI. Moreover, doing so does not advance the purpose of associating copyright and licensing information with the comment, for there is but one copyright and license notice, in the footer of the overall document.

And if the original comment is deleted, so that it no longer identifies accessible content, then the comment-specific URI even more so does not refer to copyright or license information, and it is even less reasonable to insert or retain that URI.

This non-attorney is therefore inclined to think that when referring to a comment appearing on the same Q&A page where it is reused, or having been deleted from that page, it satisfies CC-BY-SA 3.0 licensing requirements to attribute the copy to its author by SO handle, without linking to it. I am furthermore inclined to think that it is worse than useless to add or retain comment-specific URIs for comments that are deleted, but it is harmless to include such URIs for comments that are retained.

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The vast majority of contributors to SO (including, until now, myself), are unaware of the need to attribute commenters when editing comments into posts, with the result that we aren't doing so.

Yes, it's always a good practice to attribute the user who made a contribution.

This is done automatically when they propose an edit, but when you copy (non-trivial) content from their comments into your answer you best add a "as suggested by @commenter" disclaimer. Putting a hyperlink to the account on their username would be even better (in light of account renaming), but I'd consider it optional.

If you think this is too noisy or would make the post hard to read, you should at least put the disclaimer (possibly with links) in the Edit summary when making the edit. This puts the credit in the revision history where it belongs, and can be found by users who are curious about the authors of the answer text.

However, the vast majority of contributors to SO (who are not moderators) cannot delete the comment, so I'd consider it a minor issue when you forget to provide the attribution. The comment is still there on the answer, and any informed user viewing the post and looking for attributions can still make the association.

Deleted comments can only be seen by moderators. A link to a deleted comment in a question or answer thus appears to link to nothing for non-moderators. This is confusing and detracts from the content of the question or answer.

I have to agree on this. I think putting the link to the deleted comment into the edit summary would have been more appropriate here.

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    I have a real distaste for meta information. If you are going to attribute the content to someone, it should be organic. Something like "You could just put the name of the commenter on the post, or as suggested by Bergi a link to their user profile". – Braiam Sep 6 at 16:41
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    "I'd consider it a minor issue when you forget to provide the attribution." It might still be a breach of the license and therefore potentially make you vulnerable to litigation. It's probably better (if only out of courtesy) to invest some time and make sure that attribution is given also for using comments. I understand though that such things can easily be overlooked. – Trilarion Sep 7 at 7:36
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    @Trilarion Depends on how substantial the comment was. If only a suggestion for a minor change, it might not be copyrightable, if it changes the gist of the answer then yes, of course attribution is necessary. – Bergi Sep 7 at 21:05
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I doubt you will get additional guidance from SE. Creative Commons licenses are vague by design and leave ample leeway for users to figure out how they get applied. Also, consider the "reasonably practicable" keywords. Considering the interactions of every guidance, attributing the author (remember, the license requires this, but doesn't specify how it should be fulfilled) is the best we can do. Other than that, if your content is used in ways you feel the license isn't being respected, communicate with the editor first and then escalate from there.

You can do this with any content under the license, not just with comments. As an example, over on Unix and Linux users found information in a now-deleted answer to be quite useful, so the content was copied in its entirety (with attribution) and expanded upon in a new answer.

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