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How should .NET 5.0 and ASP.NET Core 5.0 tags be organized? Specifically, what should be done with the legacy tag (now removed) and tag (now marked as deprecated)?

Background

Back in 2016, Microsoft chose to rename the forthcoming releases of .NET Framework and ASP.NET Framework 5.0 to .NET Core and ASP.NET Core 1.0. By that point, the tags and had already been created in anticipation here on Stack Overflow.

Since then, there have been a number of discussions about what to do with these tags, with the tag ultimately being removed (discussion), and the tag being deprecated (discussion) with the following tag wiki:

ASP.NET5 was (code-)name of the next generation of Microsoft's ASP.NET framework. The name was abandoned and the product was released as ASP.NET Core. Don't use this tag anymore use the ASP.NET Core tag.

Fast forward several years, and Microsoft has announced that the next version of .NET Core will be .NET 5.0 in recognition that this is a successor to both .NET Framework 4.8 and .NET Core 3.1. As there is now a preview release, the and tags have been created for related questions.

Update: Per @George-Stocker's answer, while the next version of .NET will be .NET 5, the next version of ASP.NET will be ASP.NET Core 5.0. I have updated this post to reflect this.

Questions

This raises a number of closely related questions:

  • Should the deprecated tag now be marked as a synonym of ?
  • Should the removed tag now be recreated and marked as a synonym of ?
  • What version agnostic tag, if any, should be recommended? .NET 5 has more in common architecturally with .NET Core ( and ), but the name is a continuation of its .NET Framework heritage ( and ).

Note: the current tag name of is inconsistent with the convention used elsewhere (e.g., , , , &c). Personally, I prefer maintaining the [product-#.#] convention (i.e., ) for consistency.

Prior Discussion

This eventuality has been speculated about on a number of previous threads, though the can has always been kicked down the road since, at those times, there wasn’t much information about Microsoft’s plans for future versions. Nevertheless, the commentary on these threads offers good background:

In particular, an answer last year from @poke anticipates the need for this discussion:

Looking forward, we fortunately know a bit about the roadmap for ASP.NET Core and .NET Core: .NET Core will unite with everything else as .NET 5 soon. At that point, we will probably have to think about on how we proceed since .NET 5 will be more similar to .NET Core than to .NET 4.x (which is the .NET Framework).

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The "Core" moniker is going to stay, according to Microsoft:

"We hope you enjoy this release of ASP.NET Core in .NET 5! We are eager to hear about your experiences with this latest .NET 5 release. Let us know what you think by filing issues on GitHub."

Jon Galloway, member of the .NET team, confirms it in a tweet:

ASP.NET Core name stays - you'll either see "ASPNET Core running on .NET 5" (blog post link) or "ASPNET Core 5".

So:

For Framework questions that are specific to .NET 5; it should be

For framework questions specific to ASP.NET Core on .NET 5, it should be or .

Prior .NET questions that are specific to .NET Framework (aka, .NET 1.1-.NET 4.8) should probably be retagged from -> , as is the moniker for .NET Prior to 5.

(Yes, they disambiguated .NET (Core) and .NET (Framework); and since .NET 5 is a continuation of .NET Core 3.1, they're dropping the 'Framework' jazz they'd use in .NET <4.8 to keep it disambiguated).

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  • Thank you for this. I'm embarrassed to admit that I've read each and every ASP.NET Core 5.0 preview release document, and kept up on many of the GitHub threads, and yet completely missed that, pretty consistently, they refer to it as ASP.NET Core 5.0. – Jeremy Caney Sep 4 at 19:53
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    Tiny NB - the quote from Jon Galloway is missing the dots in "ASP.NET" because Twitter treats it as a hyperlink for some reason whenever you type ".NET" in a tweet. In case there is any confusion about that particular aspect. – TylerH Sep 4 at 20:05
  • Should the tag be [.net-5], for consistency with the branding, or [.net-5.0], in anticipation of future versions (e.g., [.net-5.1]). Currently, the tag that's been created is [.net-5], but it seems (to me) that [.net-5.0] would be more appropriate in the long-term. Am I overthinking this? – Jeremy Caney Sep 4 at 20:19
  • @JeremyCaney Don't feel bad; lots of people do. I maintain a newsletter dedicated to .NET and I missed it for a while. – George Stocker Sep 4 at 20:37
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    @JeremyCaney No you aren't overthinking this. There have been specific version issues in .NET core that didn't exist in .NET Framework (largely because .NET Framework changed at a glacial pace). The moderators should make .NET-5.0 and .NET-5 an alias, with a preference towards the shorter .NET-5. – George Stocker Sep 4 at 20:38
  • @GeorgeStocker: FYI: I've updated my original post to reflect the ASP.NET Core 5 name and tags in order to avoid further confusion, while also including an acknowledgement of my previous mistake so that your answer remains relevant. – Jeremy Caney Sep 4 at 20:41
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    Sigh... Microsoft and naming things is always clear as mud... – Ian Kemp Sep 6 at 8:43
  • So... this will take place? – Magnetron 12 hours ago
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Since ASP.NET Core will keep the “Core” part in future versions, we can stick to the current naming scheme for tags: , , , etc.

For .NET 5 and beyond, we should use that as the tag name. For consistency with existing tags, we should still include the minor version in the tag name, even though the roadmap for .NET so far does not plan for minor releases (and I wouldn't expect them to appear any time soon). So the tag names would be , , , etc.

As for , I feel like this tag more focuses on the general .NET platform instead of a specific framework implementation. So we shouldn't automatically convert to neither nor . Most of the questions currently tagged with will very likely apply to all frameworks anyway or already include a specific version tag.

I personally think that version-unspecific questions about the open-source & cross-platform framework formerly known as.NET Core should still be tagged with but I expect that the wording by Microsoft will eventually change so that the “Core” part will become a legacy there too. That's the problem with making “.NET” both the platform and a particular framework implementation. We'll have to see how this will eventually develop in the community.

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