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Lately, I’ve seen some suggested edits from a particular user that simply change a code block into a Stack Snippet. (Almost all of their suggestions are just this). Sometimes, the snippet isn’t even runnable (e.g. uses undefined variables) and/or is useless (e.g. HTML code that does not produce any output). In these cases, I either reject the suggestion as ‘no improvement whatsoever’ or reject and edit it to fix more issues in the post.

Is there a way to tell them not to add a Stack Snippet unless it would really benefit the post? Should I reject the next suggestion I see like this as ‘causes harm’ and explain there? If we could add a custom rejection reason when using ‘Reject and Edit’, I would have told them in my last review.

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    related: meta.stackoverflow.com/q/366015/8620333 and this is annoying – Temani Afif Sep 3 at 8:53
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    Won't the user be edit-banned after a while anyway? – user202729 Sep 3 at 8:54
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    the issue is not only with the edit but also with people automatically approving such edits without even running the code. – Temani Afif Sep 3 at 8:54
  • Mod flag is always your best friend in such a case. @user202729 not if their edits are being accepted, which it unfortunately seems is the case. – Ian Kemp Sep 3 at 13:40
  • I used to make edits like these, until one got rolled back. From now I always make sure the HTML code runs fine and if it doesn't I usually fix other problems or abandon the edit completely. – 10 Rep Sep 3 at 21:05
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    User in question – Johannes Kuhn Sep 4 at 1:38
  • Well this is awkward, I think you made edits over my two suggestions in a row yesterday, one of which was a code snippet with a broken img src....lol – cela Sep 4 at 14:52
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You have four options. The first three are in order of most to least recommended:

  1. You can flag one of the posts they've edited for moderator intervention and ask a moderator to intervene. I've done this a few times because, as Temani Afif has pointed out, bad edits like this unfortunately get approved by folks not paying attention. Also, a new user making a ton of edits might not be looking at review results in their profile.

  2. Use the custom reject reason and explain (like you suggested). This one does rely on the next reviewer doing the right thing so it's safer to do this if the edit was to a post in really bad shape (more likely to irritate other reviewers that they fixed nothing else) or a post that doesn't even use HTML/CSS/JavaScript in the first place if they're doing this with code that should never be in snippets.

  3. Reject and Edit and put your rejection reasoning in your edit description. I've done this a few times where a post urgently needed help but I wasn't sure my reason for rejecting was going to be clear to the previous editor. This one requires space to describe both the edit and the rejection and only helps if they care enough to see what happened. I don't think this is a great option for someone making a string of bad edits but it's doable.

An additional option from moderator Samuel Liew:

  1. You can also report such instances in the Bad Stack Overflow Reviews chat room, since these edits generate reviews too. Please link at least 3 suggested edits made by the user so that I know it's not a single event, and state that they are poorly edited. You can also report users who robo-approve poor edits (please link at least 3 reviews made by the approving user, when it should have been rejected).

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    Also, a new user making a ton of edits might not be looking at review results in their profile. Does anyone ever look at those? I've always put those into the same category as Wiki excerpts: very useful info, but in a place not many users go looking for it. – Adriaan Sep 3 at 12:55
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    @Adriaan At least a few people do because we've gotten meta questions about where to find that information. I did before I hit 2K rep (and very occasionally I check to see the outcome of posts I've reviewed). I think you're right that most people probably don't proactively check but, IIRC, the site tells you if you've had a suggestion rejected. – BSMP Sep 3 at 17:29
  • @Adriaan Yes, absolutely. It's detrimental to one's edit statistics to have rejected edits. Also, SamuelLiew recently created this SEDE query: Users with the most rejected suggested edits, so at the very least it's important to some of us. If I had had more non-rejected rejected edits, I'd be on that list! :O – Scratte Sep 3 at 18:26
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    (5) You can @-mention the user in the comment below the item they tried editing and explain why you rejected the edit. Users get notifications for @-mentions under posts they edited (but I’m not sure whether that holds for edit suggestions — it definitely should). – Konrad Rudolph Sep 3 at 20:25
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    @KonradRudolph I thought about doing that, but the FAQ says that any user who edited the post can be notified but it 'does not include pending or rejected edit suggestions'. – cherryblossom Sep 3 at 21:32
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    @KonradRudolph It does. I've tested it and it does. If the edit is accepted of course. – 10 Rep Sep 4 at 0:50

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