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I recently answered a question which most programmers could clearly tell is quite a common duplicate among people who are new to programming.

I could quite easily flag the question as a duplicate and move on, however, because of the way the question has been asked we can probably assume that the asker has a very basic knowledge of programming and they may struggle to understand the duplicate answer.

My answer added a bit of an explanation and an example of how to solve their specific issue, which is useful to the asker but is unlikely to be useful to anyone else (based on the title) coming to StackOverflow.

Should I have flagged the question to be closed as a duplicate, should I downvote the question and add a comment, or was it appropriate to answer the question as I have done with some helpful points while still linking to the duplicate for additional understanding?

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    If it's clearly a duplicate, definitely flag the question as a duplicate, regardless of whether you think OP is skillful enough to adapt the canonical question to their particular situation. (If you want to help out, you may comment suggesting how they adapt, but I've found that commenting while closing can often backfire) Stack Overflow primarily exists to help future readers who come across similar problems; it's not meant to be a help desk for everyone who posts a question. – CertainPerformance Sep 1 at 4:42
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    I think the best way to help, yet also preserve SO's goal of being a useful collection of knowledge for future readers, is probably to explain in a comment what high-end concept they're hitting up against so that they're more likely to figure out the answer themselves, and linking to whatever the canonical is. That canonical question should explain it thoroughly and in a depth that they can understand. If it doesn't, however... Personally I'm a lot more tempted to leave a helpful answer for both OP and future visitors, but should probably improve the canonical instead. – zcoop98 Sep 1 at 16:00
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    If you feel the answers at the duplicate question may be hard for a beginner to grasp, there's nothing preventing you from adding another answer to that question. – Mark Ransom Sep 1 at 20:19
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I could quite easily flag the question as a duplicate and move on, however, because of the way the question has been asked we can probably assume that the asker has a very basic knowledge of programming and they may struggle to understand the duplicate answer.

If it's a duplicate, it's a duplicate. When you know that a question can be answered by the answers to another question (the object they ask for or the problem about is equal) then flag/vote to close the question as duplicate. No matter whether the OP might understand it at the moment or not.

Maybe s/he do not understand it at the moment but the duplicate question and the answers there are very helpful when s/he is be able to understand it.

In the case of not duping, the questioner[and others] might lose a very helpful reference for his/their education.

If you feel the answers to the duplicate doesn't answer the actual question very well, try to improve the duplicate by f.e. giving more insights about specific edge cases.

"My answer added a bit of an explanation and an example of how to solve their specific issue, which is useful to the asker but is unlikely to be useful to anyone else (based on the title) coming to Stack Overflow."

However, there is nothing wrong to gave a short customized answer to a custom question. To helping others is the purpose of this whole network.

Explain the specific problems, but avoid to explain in detail what already is best explained at the answers of the duplicate.


"Should I have flagged the question to be closed as a duplicate?"

Yes.

"Should I downvote the question and add a comment?"

Your choice. Note that I personally don't like to just downvote questions because they are duplicates. I judge upon the quality of the content of the question itself to maybe suggest myself to downvote.

I consider myself often in the situation, that I just don't got the information I wanted after a long research. Just downvoting because I didn't know about something or didn't find something out, feels inappropriate.

Nonetheless, I also don't like questions which really ask for very basic things.

So at the end, I decide at the specific case, if I downvote or not.

"or was it appropriate to answer the question as I have done with some helpful points while still linking to the duplicate for additional understanding?

Yes, absolutely.


Summary:

You can give a short and custom answer to a custom question, but don't try to cover entirely things which are explained at the duplicate.

If you think the answers at the duplicate are not so good or could be better, improve the canonical duplicate and place your own answer there.

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    "questioner [and others] might lose a very helpful reference for his education." - This. People seem to not understand that duplicates are not a necessarily bad thing. They are pointers to more information. – Nick Sep 3 at 8:16
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    @Nick Considering most SO canonical duplicates are easily found by literally Googling the error message that is invariably used as the new dupe question's title, their usefulness as pointers is generally suspect at best. What really should happen is that these useless dupes are deleted outright, but that sweet SEO juice is apparently more important. – Ian Kemp Sep 3 at 16:34
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    @IanKemp I did say "necessarily", an awful lot of dupes I come across have no concrete canonical, and in these cases duplicates are more helpful. I'm not refering to NPE/generic error message dupes. – Nick Sep 3 at 16:59
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What you should have done was flag/vote to close that question as "Needs details or clarity" or "Other > Needs debugging details", because the code presented there is not a Minimal, Complete and Verifiable Example: where are the definitions of the makeQueueOfQueues and mergeSortedQueues methods?

Attempting to answer questions that lack an MCVE is an exercise in futility:

  • 99%1 of the time, such questions are posted by people who expect their code to either be debugged or fixed for them, and/or lack the basic knowledge to understand any answer that you would attempt to provide.
  • Such users are extremely unlikely to bother to upvote and/or mark your answer as the solution, even if it does solve their problem, so you won't get any reputation either.
  • Your guess as to what the issue was is probably correct, but without an MCVE, it can only ever be a guess. And Stack Overflow isn't about guesses, it's about well-defined problems with well-defined solutions.

In other words, these users and their terrible questions aren't worth your time. Such users are informally termed "help vampires2" by the Meta community, which is an extremely apt description: these users are not interested in contributing to Stack Overflow and its repository of high-quality questions and answers, only getting what they want and moving on.

Treat the "new contributor" badge as a warning. Don't waste your time answering bad questions. Don't let the help vampires win.

1 I've found that it takes me about two-and-a-half days maxing out my downvotes on front-page questions to find a single one worth an upvote.
2 I'm expecting Stack Exchange Inc. to deem this term as "not nice" and censor it any day now.

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    99.5% of statistics are made up on the spot. – Josiah Yoder Sep 2 at 12:50
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    Do not treat the "new contributor" badge as a warning. Judge questions by their content, not who's posting them. – miken32 Sep 2 at 15:37
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    @miken32 I didn't say the "new contributor" badge is the only criteria you should judge a question by - merely pointed out that given the trend of most new contributors to be help vampires, additional caution is advisable when deciding whether to engage with their questions or not. – Ian Kemp Sep 2 at 15:39
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    @JosiahYoder I had heard it was 87%. Things must be getting worse. – Mark Ransom Sep 2 at 15:41
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    Bad users can become good users. Voting to close with "needs details" is harsh, but may help a vampire grow into a good contributor. Writing a helpful answer, but also telling the user to improve their question (and explaining how/why) is less harsh and more likely to make them stick around. You don't have any obligation to do that, but if you want to, I'd say go ahead. – Kalinda Pride Sep 3 at 0:40
  • I don't really expect that a new user knows how to accept a question, or that it would be a good thing. I suggest it would be ultimately helpful to hint users at the fact that the answer that answered the question should be accepted, even if that feels like begging for reputation. – kutschkem Sep 3 at 7:22
  • @JosiahYoder "60% of the time, it works every time" – Lankymart Sep 3 at 8:14
  • @MarkRansom I made up my statistic on the spot. – Josiah Yoder Sep 3 at 14:17
  • @JosiahYoder I kind of figured. But I genuinely think it was 87% the first time I heard that line used. – Mark Ransom Sep 3 at 14:29
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    @KalindaPride Answering a duplicate question is not a good idea and will not help a bad user become a good user. When you close a question, it gives users links to the help center where the user can learn what is needed to improve their question. Writing helpful answers to bad questions tells users they can write bad questions and still get helpful answers. – Heretic Monkey Sep 3 at 16:01
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    @KalindaPride Answering a question you know to be a duplicate is wrong as per the rules of Stack Overflow. New users don't get a pass on this rule just because they're new, and especially not because they haven't read the site's rules; you don't get a pass because you are trying to be helpful. – Ian Kemp Sep 3 at 16:30
  • @MarkRansom: The joke is that the number is made up on the spot. It has to be a different number every time, otherwise it's not made up on the spot, and then it's no longer a joke, just a lie. – Cris Luengo Sep 3 at 16:39
  • @CrisLuengo but then it's a meta-joke, right? – Mark Ransom Sep 3 at 16:47
  • @Everyone Sorry for making such a time-wasting discussion-prompting joke. – Josiah Yoder Sep 3 at 18:11
  • Thank you for providing evidence to support your statistic. – Josiah Yoder Sep 3 at 18:14

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