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What is best practice for questions that were asked/answered (correctly), but where the software has now changed, but no one has updated the answer? (e.g. where a new answer would be completely different from the existing, previously correct answer).

For context, this could (or is perhaps more likely to occur) on questions that are quite old, even to the extent that the previous asker/answerer may not use the technology any more (and so may not be interested / have time to help update the question and answer)

My best ideas are:

  1. Start a bounty
  2. Comment on the question and answer to see if anyone knows of an up to date answer

Are there any other things that can be done? (I assume asking the question again asking for a 'contemporary approach' would not be a good idea on grounds of it being a duplicate?)

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    You'd click the "Ask Question" button. And mention the existing canonical so SO users know not to vote the dup. It is not at all a workaround for "I don't understand the existing answer" btw, the more typical mishap. Well, not for you, just make that obvious to the readers. – Hans Passant Aug 16 at 22:44
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    "where a new answer would be completely different" -- how are you establishing that that would be the case? If you know what a new answer would be, just post the new answer to the existing question. If you don't know the new answer, then you can post a new question as suggested by Hans, but you'd better be darn sure you can articulate clearly how it is you know that a new answer is needed, in spite of not knowing yourself what that new answer is (e.g. possibly the technology has changed sufficiently that the old answer simply doesn't work any more). – Peter Duniho Aug 17 at 20:19
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    Related/duplicate: meta.stackexchange.com/q/156043/147640 – GSerg Aug 17 at 23:25
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    Related: meta.stackoverflow.com/q/255198/11683 – GSerg Aug 17 at 23:26
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    Woe is they who have to maintain legacy software and have their answers to problems taken away from them by efforts like this. – Gimby Aug 18 at 8:33
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    You should add a note to the obsolete answer, and possibly write another. See: Should I update very old answers when the solution becomes deprecated? – sponge Aug 19 at 0:04
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    Since we discuss the flaws of the system so often, I’d like to mention that sometime, it does work. This answer has been given seven years after the question had been asked, to incorporate new development, at a time when two dozen answers already existed. And it managed to raise up to place three. Which is not bad for such a late answer. – Holger Aug 19 at 7:28
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If the question is quite old - seriously consider doing the following:

  1. Asking a new question, whose title and body clarify it's about the new state of affairs (e.g. "How should I do <Foo> with <Bar> being available")
  2. Link the new question to the old one, explaining that it deals with the status quo ante.
  3. Possibly tweak the title of the old question to clarify the difference.

Of course, if you can somehow consult with the users involved with the previous question and answers, that's a good start to decide what to do.

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    Also, check and update tags, if applicable. Sometimes old questions have generic tags that have been superceded or supplemented by more specific ones. These can also help to resolve ambiguity. – J... Aug 18 at 16:05
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I'd like to answer this as someone who frequently maintains 10/15/20+ year old software.

What is best practice for questions that were asked/answered (correctly), but where the software has now changed, but no one has updated the answer? (e.g. where a new answer would be completely different from the existing, previously correct answer).

An answer that was correct for old versions back then is probably still the correct answer for those old versions today. Please don't just simply update it to apply to the current version! If nothing else, you'll be changing the intent of the original author and also what those voters had voted for.

For context, this could (or is perhaps more likely to occur) on questions that are quite old, even to the extent that the previous asker/answerer may not use the technology any more (and so may not be interested / have time to help update the question and answer)

It's not uncommon for the OP to go quiet after they've got an answer. The answer that they marked as correct was the one that helped them at the time. Don't worry about it. If someone is actively looking for an answer then they'll probably glance over all of the answers anyway.

Are there any other things that can be done?

If you find the need to comment on or insert a notice into the old highly upvoted answer then please just stick to the facts.

Saying that the answer was appropriate until version X and now something else is best practice is good because it helps both people using up-to-date versions and also those of us dealing with the past.

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  • "An answer that was correct for old versions back then is probably still the correct answer for those old versions today" The point of the question though is for answers that apply to all versions, or cases where the version is not specified. E.g. in C# 8.0 now you would recommend Using statements for some things, but if you are on 7.3 or earlier, that feature isn't available. If someone asks how to do something where a Using statement would be useful, and just specifies "C#" but not a version... then holding off because old versions of C# don't have Using is not helpful. – TylerH Aug 19 at 16:26
  • @TylerH Yes, it's reasonable to assume that answers should relate to the current version unless otherwise specified. The question here as I understood it was about how to handle old answers that were about the current version at some point in the past. That's not the same as someone answering for old versions at the time of writing. – Don Cruickshank Aug 19 at 18:57
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Commenting may get you the answers you need as well. Look at anything for the Swift language and you're likely to find a bunch of answers "Here is the accepted answer, updated for Swift X.XX"

I personally prefer this, as it at least keeps the answers together.

If it's not viable, then tags likely need to be changed from ZZZ software to ZZZ X.Y software

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    This is just noise; such comments should be deleted. We don't need a glossary of comments pointing to answers; just scroll down until you find the answer you need. – TylerH Aug 19 at 16:27
  • @TylerH The comment is to ask them to update an answer. It can be deleted after the answers are updated--the comment isn't supposed to be the answer – Mars Aug 20 at 4:55
  • Comments aren't supposed to be links to other answers, either. If you want an answerer to update their answer, just ask them to do that. Don't advertise one answer in the comments of another... that smacks of poor taste. – TylerH Aug 20 at 13:24
  • @TylerH What? That's exactly what I suggested... The answers themselves say "here is ___'s answer, updated for Swift Y.YYY" – Mars Aug 20 at 14:24
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The best approach that I can think of is creating a bounty since you can set a reason for it to attract up-to-date answers.

You might also want to check the answer(s) to check if they still work. Of course, this really depends on the software and how it has changed.

If there's any documentation for the project and the project is active, you might be able to refer to that.

Stack Overflow used to run something called "Stack Overflow Documentation". You may be able to download the archive and see if it mentions anything about that.

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This exact scenario happened to me recently. I went with the "ask a new question" approach (and then somewhat awkwardly found an answer myself a few hours later).

My reasoning was that the original question was very old, some existing answers went beyond the narrow scope of the question (beyond syntax and into behavior) and I had read some articles about planned syntax changes, so I knew for certain that modern answers would differ from the previous.

I think the answer to the OP might be that you have to take it case by case, but these might be some helpful guidelines.

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    Nothing awkward about finding an answer yourself. In that case you should answer yourself, or if you found the answer in some other SO question, maybe flag it as duplicate? – bracco23 Aug 18 at 8:24

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