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Voting on answers to questions makes sense. Users can collectively decide the best answer to the OP's question, even if it's not the chosen one. Voting on questions, however, is vague and fraught with some serious issues. What are users voting for and what's the criteria? It's time to rethink this feature and do away with it entirely, especially when users have a negative reactions to it. It is also a major contributor in creating a hostile and unwelcoming community.

While I am not entirely sure, I assume if a question receives enough downvotes then a moderator will be alerted to step in. This seems redundant to me. Questions already can be flagged for the moderator, or one will intervene if they come across it. If, however, the voting is intended to show its popularity among users, then favoriting already serves this purpose. Whatever its intent, it's a just vague tally of votes featured prominently on a question with an open interpretation.

Unfortunately, it is often negatively interpreted by users, which is counterproductive towards SE's goal of creating a friendlier community. The feature is arguably the leading instigator of hostility. Too often, users are enraged and frustrated when their questions are downvoted and rejected, especially when they don't know the reason.

Downvoting questions are also counterproductive in achieving SE's stated goal of fostering diversity by creating a more welcoming community. I would wager the overwhelming majority of its users and staff are white, male and or American. At the very least, it's the impression it gives. Users who identify as members of underrepresented groups may react more negatively when their questions are downvoted. They may feel emotionally hurt, suspecting their question was downvoted not for its merit, but out of bigotry of other users. I've personally seen this happen more than I care to recall. Understandably, many will hide their identity out of fear of being hurt.

Finally, a great deal of time and effort is wasted by moderators, users and computing resources explaining why a question was downvoted along with the ensuing debates. The time and effort could be better utilized helping the OP improve the quality of their question. Combined with the vagueness of its utility, perhaps it's time to do away with downvoting.

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  • 9
    Thinking that the question points were in any way “proven” by the votes would be a mistake, IMO.
    – yivi
    Aug 14 '20 at 19:37
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    "While I am not entirely sure, I assume if a question receives enough downvotes then a moderator will be alerted to step in." There are places where people with enough rep cna go to find posts that have an extraordinary amount of votes (up, down, or otherwise,) but it's hardly something any kind of majority of people use. People who have access to it are already a minority, and only small number of those even know it exists.
    – Kevin B
    Aug 14 '20 at 19:39
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    Voting on meta works different since they are also used to show agreement/disagreement. Votes on meta will not influence your reputation.
    – BDL
    Aug 14 '20 at 19:39
  • You should post an answer here: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/399848/…
    – rene
    Aug 14 '20 at 19:44
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    To be clear, are you suggesting no voting at all on questions (including upvoting) or just downvoting on questions?
    – ryanyuyu
    Aug 14 '20 at 19:46
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    I rest my case. You've already made up your mind. There's very little point in attempting to educate you with that mindset. So I'm not going to bother.
    – fbueckert
    Aug 14 '20 at 19:53
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    Coincidentally, the question asked right before yours is that exact complaint. And also incorrect. The assumptions being made show a distinct lack of interest in perhaps learning more before passing judgement.
    – fbueckert
    Aug 14 '20 at 20:02
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    Honestly, it took me less than 5 seconds to realize this question was not constructive, so don't use quick votes as an argument. Voting and reputation are a key part of this site and its success, there were plenty of Q&A sites before it but the gamification likely contributed significantly to this ones success. You can't suddenly change the core of the site this radically, it's just not realistic.
    – Erik A
    Aug 14 '20 at 20:03
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    "What are users voting for" - stackoverflow.com/help/why-vote. "what's the criteria" - "This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful".
    – jonrsharpe
    Aug 14 '20 at 20:09
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    While I understand the passion and motivation to close/delete this question, it's actually really important that we don't. We're burying signal that curation is still a good thing.
    – Makoto
    Aug 14 '20 at 20:22
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    On meta there can be questions with lots of downvotes that nevertheless are ontopic. This is one of them.
    – Trilarion
    Aug 14 '20 at 20:29
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    Well, since it still doesn't look like you're actually open to learning, I submit you never argued your case to begin with.
    – fbueckert
    Aug 14 '20 at 20:49
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    "While I am not entirely sure, I assume if a question receives enough downvotes then a moderator will be alerted to step in." No, moderators do not step in based on downvotes. Voting is intended to show other users' assessment of the post's overall quality, including research effort, clarity, and usefulness. You could have seen this by reading the tooltip on the downvote arrow. Voting doesn't have anything to do with friendliness. I do agree, however, that an undue amount of time is spent discussing downvotes. So with that, I'm ending this pointless discussion.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Aug 14 '20 at 20:58
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    "Unfortunately, it is often negatively interpreted by users" - I see your argument, and raise you the fact that some people take constructive comments suggesting improvements as personal attacks, and retaliate hard, often to the point of a suspension or account deletion. Votes are anonymous and sends a signal without letting the asker know who, which helps serve as a safety net for both sides
    – Zoe
    Aug 14 '20 at 22:03
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    Leaving a comment, even without downvoting, has come to the point of feeling like a russian roulette - maybe you get lucky, but there's also a very real chance you'll regret it, regardless of how polite and constructive you are.
    – Zoe
    Aug 14 '20 at 22:03
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I don't know your gender.
I don't know your age.
I don't know your ethnicity.
But more fundamentally, I don't care about any of the above when it comes to answering your question.
All I care about is whether or not your question is clear, concise, and contains enough details to be answered reasonably.

Downvoting may sting, but if your question isn't clear, concise or lacks details, realize that we're not attacking you personally, we're just wanting to answer clear, concise, detail-laden questions.

...but if you discover that you have a lot of these kinds of experiences in which your question is downvoted, perhaps it'd be better to consider...maybe you're not asking questions in as concise or as clear a way as you thought, or maybe you're not doing enough in the way of research, or maybe you're not filling in enough details.

If one can demonstrate that they are doing all of that and are still getting lambasted with downvotes, then let's have a proper chat about that.

Until then...

don't take it personally.

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    As an addendum, I will say that you know none of the above about me either as an answerer, and when you're getting your answer, it should be the furthest thing from your mind.
    – Makoto
    Aug 14 '20 at 19:44
  • Are your criteria common with the vast number of users on SE? No one should feel stung even if their question is not clear, concise and detailed enough to meet your standards.
    – ATL_DEV
    Aug 14 '20 at 19:49
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    @ATL_DEV: Yes. To put it another way, I'm a lead developer on a team with four other engineers. If any one of them asked me a question in the same fashion as some of Stack Overflow questions, I'd politely stop the conversation and ask them to come back to me when they've done a bit more in the way of research. Time is money; I can't babysit people who don't know what they're asking. Good fences make good neighbors; I'm telling you up front that this is what I'm expecting, and while you may be stung by it, at least you're not surprised.
    – Makoto
    Aug 14 '20 at 19:51
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    The sting is by design. "Sure, it stings a bit to get downvoted. I’ve been downvoted myself on Stack Overflow. And each time, it makes me pause. But that’s good! That’s necessary! You have to believe there are potential consequences for every post you make — both good and bad. This is how things work on real playgrounds; why would we expect our web playgrounds to be any different?" -Jeff Atwood (Stack Overflow Co-Founder)
    – Travis J
    Aug 14 '20 at 19:51
  • @Makoto, Unlike your workplace, you're not the only one available to answer a question. If you don't have the time and or the question isn't to your liking, you don't have to answer it.
    – ATL_DEV
    Aug 14 '20 at 20:09
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    @ATL_DEV: I speak in general terms. I am not the only person who works a full time job here on a site full of volunteers. Saying that "it could be someone else's problem/burden/choice" is something I find quite lazy when it comes to question asking/answering hygiene, as if the opinions or the time commitments of someone else who didn't know about this Meta post or didn't bother to respond don't have as much weight.
    – Makoto
    Aug 14 '20 at 20:11
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    @ATL_DEV To add to Makoto’s point: despite popular perception, SO isn’t here to “answer your question”, in the sense of being a personal helpdesk. It’s here to answer everyone’s questions, Wikipedia-like; to be a broad-teaching, long-lasting library of knowledge. Like a library, like Wikipedia, this requires curation, and the body of volunteers here not only answer Ws bur make sure we answer the right Qs: the ones that will help someone else in the future. Hence voting: a content ranking system, not a slap at OP.
    – Dan Bron
    Aug 14 '20 at 20:18
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While I am not entirely sure, I assume if a question receives enough downvotes then a moderator will be alerted to step in.

This assumption is untrue. There is a mechanism where a question becomes greyed out and harder to find when it falls below a certain score threshold, so if anything downvoting a question means it receives less attention.

Finally, a great deal of time and effort is wasted by moderators, users and computing resources explaining why a question was downvoted along with the ensuing debates.

Explaining what downvotes mean to a newer user can be a bit of a chore, but learning the community's voting system is a core part of site participation. Explaining why a (bad/unresearched) question receives a downvote helps keep question quality higher. While we'd prefer that users learn this on their own via the help center, manually informing a user what question voting means is by no means a wasted effort. It helps make sure that new users have a better understanding of site expectations.

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First off, downvotes are content based. But beyond that...

What about the core set of reasons put forth for downvoting?

The Value of Downvoting

How would you prevent users from abusing their ability to ask questions?

Downvotes are a key metric in making sure that users who do not abide by the rules of site are limited in their activity. With millions of users and thousands of questions per day, this is very important to the overall health of the exchange.

How would you include your own reaction to questions which are not useful?

There are on topic questions (only because we haven't properly refined the close reason set enough) which are not subject to closure. However, they are highly unlikely to help anyone going forward. They may also collide in search results preventing similar questions which do help people from getting the attention they deserve. Without downvoting, how do I indicate to other users that a question I came across while trying to solve the same problem was in fact not useful?

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  • I edited my question because you took it too broadly. I mentioned that downvoting answers makes sense. My issue is with questions.
    – ATL_DEV
    Aug 14 '20 at 20:03

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