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I've requested concrete details (with a guide to obtain them) but the new SO user repeatedly responds with everything except what was asked of them. It's starting to feel like a waste of time having to state the same thing, phrased differently. I don't think it's intentional nor malicious but, again, feels like a waste of time.

The point of comments is to clarify the issue not just for me but also for anyone else who may want to answer the question as well as anyone who may stumble on this issue in the future.

What's the correct course of action here?

  • Leave the question open and let someone else with more patience handle it?
  • Or close the question, as it "Needs debugging details"?

EDIT: Although this was supposed to be a generic & impartial question it was based on this SO question.

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  • 36
    The close vote should have been cast much earlier – Kevin B Aug 14 at 14:32
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    Close the question. Sounds like closing as unclear might be just as reasonable as needs debugging details. – Robert Longson Aug 14 at 14:32
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    If it feels like a waste of time, move on to more productive pursuits. Not every post is salvageable. Not every user can be helped. Remember to use your votes. – yivi Aug 14 at 14:38
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    Downvote if you feel it's appropiate and close vote. – TylerH Aug 14 at 14:41
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    Thanks folks. I voted to close. – Joe Aug 14 at 14:50
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    Unfortunately, some posters cannot supply the details asked for because they just copied code and did not design, author, compile, link, test or debug anything. Others are just homework scammers - just taking money from marks and reposting to SO. Ask once and, if no sane reply, just down/close/delete vote:( – Martin James Aug 14 at 15:23
  • @Martin James: Re "homework scammers": Some of the freelancer sites, e.g. Upwork, are used for that purpose. Say, a USD 5 job. – Peter Mortensen Aug 15 at 1:40
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    @PeterMortensen yeah, well, the freelancers can do whatever homework they want, (obviously), and I don't care. It's the deadbeats who just repost the work to SO, so abusing contributors for their own monetary gain, that rankles:(( – Martin James Aug 15 at 12:15
11

For future situations: If the question is unclear, there's no need to wait to vote to close. Unclear questions that get closed can always be reopened if they're fixed (and they'll have more visibility to get fixed if it happens sooner rather than later).

Occasionally for borderline questions, where I think there's a good chance of improvement and my limited, frequently exhausted supply of close votes might be better spent elsewhere, I'll ask for clarification and come back to the question later to see if they fixed it (I use a userscript to aid me in revisiting such questions). But if I've had a couple rounds of unsuccessful back-and-forth, like you did here, it's definitely time to vote to close and move on.

You (or others) can always work with the OP to fix the question so that it can be reopened via the reopen queue. That queue is pretty successful in keeping the number of pending tasks pretty low, so things are getting reviewed there.

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    Somewhere around the second paragraph, this answer implicitly suggests delaying a vote to close. That is bad advice, and always the wrong thing to do. See the question I closed this as a duplicate of, or my answer here. Always vote to close immediately. Do not wait for clarification; do not pass Go; do not collect $200. If you want to work together with the asker in comments to clarify, you can and are encouraged to do so, but that should be done after casting your vote to close. – Cody Gray Aug 15 at 9:24
  • @CodyGray to clarify, I do this because I virtually always use all 50 close votes allocated to me on a given day. My logic is that I would rather spend them on worse questions where I think it's less likely that I'd end up retracting it or voting to reopen after an improvement. If I were not habitually running out of close votes, I would follow the advice in your comment and my first paragraph to immediately vote to close any unclear question, as it is correct in principle. (I edited the paragraph in question slightly to clarify this) – Ryan M Aug 15 at 9:34
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    It's depressing when curators have to filter out tbe very worst questions from a large pool of bad for close votes:( – Martin James Aug 15 at 12:20
-11

I think that it's ok to refrain ourselves for voting to close / downvote on recently posted questions no matter if the OP is a new user or not but after you get a reply of the OP where it's clear that they are not understanding the feedback given and their are not asking for clarification on that feedback, we should vote to close and perhaps also downvote.

Later if the OP fixes their question we could reverse/retract our votes.

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  • Fair point. It comes back to @yivi's comment of moving on to 'more productive pursuits' than having to go back and reverse the votes etc. I've updated my question w/ a link to the actual SO question I was referencing. – Joe Aug 14 at 19:22
  • @joe Are you aware of "the meta effect"? – Rubén Aug 14 at 19:26
  • Sure but I figured we're speculating while there's a concrete example at hand. Also, I came to meta in good faith that people who'll come across this post won't downvote just for the sake of downvoting. – Joe Aug 14 at 19:30
  • Let see if "the meta effect" is something that is something from past or if it's still alive. Anyway, I think than as you a are looking for a general an impartial question including only one example doesn't shows that, but not big problem, you could add more examples later. – Rubén Aug 14 at 19:33
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    Question hasn't been flamed into the ground yet. That's a good start. – user4581301 Aug 14 at 23:42
  • Retracting an upvote/downvote requires an edit (unless it is within a few minutes). – Peter Mortensen Aug 15 at 1:45
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    @PeterMortensen I said, "if the OP fixes their question..." – Rubén Aug 15 at 1:56
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