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Are there any deciders in SO that can decide top-down against the community? Alternatively, are there any diamond moderators that can take up a stand against common community opinions?

And if there are, how can they be contacted? This can be inside or outside this community process.

Context: I would like to try a feature-request to change the badge incentives that monitor a daily login on SO over a longer time, see Why I believe the Fanatic badge should be canceled/reformulated. The request is not new, and it got strong downvotes over the years. Without a third way, nothing will happen. I see a biased voting and an awareness problem of the community, that is why I would like to try it this way. I shall better make it clear that this question is not at all to be answered in view of the actual aim, it is a process question, and the aim is only give to give the use case of it. That is why it is tagged with and not with .

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    "The request is not new, and it got strong downvotes over the years." -- could that be because the community has felt along that the idea was not in the community's best interest? "Without a third way, nothing will happen" -- and maybe this is a good thing. Perhaps nothing should happen. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 8 at 10:46
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    My own feeling is, "meh, it's just a badge. Ignore it if you want" – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 8 at 10:48
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    You should be open to the possibility that you do not speak for the community on this topic. – ivarni Jul 8 at 10:48
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    Can you expand on why something should be done that the community disagrees with? I expect there are cases where that is a good thing, but why should it apply here? – halfer Jul 8 at 10:49
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    Sure, by all means. I don't think a single person should be able to force the company to go against the will of the community and that's my opinion on it. – ivarni Jul 8 at 10:52
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    You can always try tweeting about it. Just show outrage and get a lot of people to retweet. Make sure you tag the official SO account. (And yes, I'm criticizing the company here). – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Jul 8 at 11:06
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    You told a bunch of people that their collective opinion doesn't matter to you, and you want to bypass them to force your personal preference on them no matter what they think. Honestly, how did you expect them to react? Why do you think that would get a positive reaction? – Cody Gray Jul 8 at 11:16
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    Values? This is a silly rule about a silly tag that designates some sort of silly non-achievement. To paint it as a value problem... I'm sorry, it's almost comical. If you were talking about a badge that is required to become a moderator of this site, then you'd have some sort of a point. But you don't. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Jul 8 at 11:16
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    Of course it could be right. But you aren't asking us to reconsider it. You're asking how to ignore us, bypass us, go over our heads and force your pet change down our throats. That's an entirely different matter. You talk about how this shows our values, but I think it shows yours a bit more clearly. Respect is a two-way street: you have to respect the thoughts/feelings/opinions of others, too, just as you want them to respect yours. – Cody Gray Jul 8 at 11:19
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    "especially if no one understands why this is critical regarding general values" - I'd caution you against that line of thought. It's all too easy to dig your heels in and assume disagreement is indicative of a flaw in the other's grasp of values. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Jul 8 at 11:26
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    Bear in mind that "correct" means different things in different contexts. In the context of the SE network, the simple fact is that the only definition of "correct" is "this is what the community wants". That's just how it is. So even if the community is wrong, by some other measure, that isn't relevant. The only measure of a proposal's value that has relevance here is whether the community approves of it or not. Yes, there are huge problems with that approach but i) there are also great benefits and ii) that's the way we work. – terdon Jul 8 at 13:31
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    @Lorenz - are you testing if anyone notices Russel's paradox here? The due process for going against the community is winning people over. Democratic processes are not about the correctness / righteousness / wothiness of a cause - they are about reaching an acceptable solution that most can agree upon. This is by no means a perfect system, but it is more than 2 millenia old and battle-tested. If you really care about an unpopular position - rally those who think the same, gather hard data (i.e. "how many users complained about fanatic badge") - make it difficult to refuse you outright. – Oleg Valter Jul 8 at 14:03
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    Disagreement does not equal personal attack. If you want to be a member of a community and not go crazy, consider learning to live with the fact that not everyone does or should agree with you. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 8 at 16:49
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    "No one would be harmed"? I believe your last attempt at bringing this up pointed out that everyone who already has the badge and earned it the hard way would be harmed by the cheapening of it. This seems like such a quixotic windmill to tilt at; it's a badge. It doesn't offer reputation, it doesn't make using the site easier, nothing at all. – fbueckert Jul 8 at 17:07
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    @Lorenz - please do not use the word "discrimination" unless you are ready to back it up. This is a heavy accusation (borderline of CoC breach) and should not be said lightly. That said, one that feels discriminated usually calls for an arbiter. Moderators are properly elected arbiters in such cases, at least two of which engaged with you and both judged the same as others. If you still disagree, it is understandable that you would want to call a higher arbiter, which is the company, but be prepared that the decision might not be in your favour. – Oleg Valter Jul 8 at 18:05
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The purpose of the Meta site is to engage and discuss with the community. If you aren't interested in that, then Meta is not the appropriate place for you.

You can contact the company directly on this page, but they don't typically accept feature requests there. Instead, you are directed to Meta, precisely because it makes sense to get community buy-in for any change to a site feature.

Beyond this, don't act like your proposal has never been considered. People thought about that when the badge was first introduced. It just misses the whole point of a "fanatic" badge. A Stack Overflow fanatic wouldn't be discouraged by things like religion and holidays. There is literally no advantage to adding all of that complexity to the badge requirements, and it would make the badge a lot less fun.

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    You got my upvote, thank you for the discussion points. Discussion is often narrowed down to a few people that are engaged in it, that is one small other reason for the question here. It might be that on meta, there is a bias against a specific idea which does not represent the majority (though I do not believe that myself and this was not the reason to ask the question). – Lorenz Jul 8 at 11:03
  • An incentive is an incentive. Badges are considered to be good on the whole, if you see a person with her points and her badge number, you deduce her experience. That is why such badges is critical, even if they are called with name of negative connotation. That again should be all what I should say about the contents, as this generates a duplicate of the discussion, sorry for this. – Lorenz Jul 8 at 11:09
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    @Lorenz: Could you clarify what the reason to ask the question actually is then? It certainly sounds like "I want to know what I can do if I believe I know better than the rest of the community." I'd say that's a dangerous path. – Jon Skeet Jul 8 at 11:10
  • @JonSkeet I know what you mean, which makes it no better. I still see my action here as part of the community, and I do not want to accept why we should talk about "danger". In the end, it is a discussion, and to me, it is more important to raise this issue than to change it in the end, I know that I do not have any realistc chance. I will think about your "dangerous" answer and I should probably keep away from this dangerous thing, which would imply some critism against such words as well. – Lorenz Jul 8 at 11:31
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    @Lorenz: I talk about it being a dangerous path because I don't think any one community member should be able to go over the heads of everyone else. Why do you think more attention should be paid to your views than to the views of those who disagree with you? – Jon Skeet Jul 8 at 11:48
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    @Lorenz: I don't entirely follow, but if you're basically saying you think it's okay to ignore the community because you think there's a silent majority who would agree with you, then again I think that's dangerous. If you can't persuade the people who are actually engaged in the matter, I think you should drop it. (Note that it's not a matter of "wrong" or "right" here - it's an opinion.) – Jon Skeet Jul 8 at 12:02
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    @Lorenz and what amount of "support" for you would make you back up? You say you are looking to bypass the community cause you seem to think there are others like you who just don't speak up. So... how many upvotes would your proposal needs, while still being HIGHLY downvoted, for you to go "there's enough ppl supporting my view for it to make sense now"? Cause.... I feel like there is no actual number, and until you get what you're asking for, there will always be mental gymnastic to rationalize it. – Patrice Jul 8 at 12:42
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    @Lorenz As always, the feedback on closed questions is displayed in the giant blue box. You aren't asking for input from the community, so this is not on-topic for Meta. – Cody Gray Jul 8 at 15:33
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    @Lorenz - you have asked for input on how to avoid community input (hence the paradox reference in my other comment) which is likely why the question is closed by 5 people with the priviledge. Please note that you still got valid (!) responses on what you can do which should be a further evidence that one should not seek top-down solutions but confer with the community at large instead. – Oleg Valter Jul 8 at 16:46
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    @Lorenz don't dodge my question plz. What number would make you say 'oh, that support makes it logical then. Enough ppl support me. I'll back off now'. My initial feeling was 'that number will never come up, he'll do more mental gymnastics to avoid it'... And see what your answer was. Just give me 'if the question was -20 with 10 upvotes and 30 downvotes, I wouldn't look at bypassing the community' answer plz. I'm curious – Patrice Jul 8 at 19:38
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    this answer misses to refer Twitter, which is long known as the most efficient communication channel for those willing to harm the community. The rest looks good to me – gnat Jul 9 at 9:11
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    @lorenz lol. So your point is? that's still not an answer to my, at the end of the day, very straightforward question. Now, you seem to say "I'll ask a sample that gives me the answer I want"... which definitely means my interpretation was correct. What kind of support, while still having an overwhelming "no" response would make it so you don't feel coerced to bypass the community? – Patrice Jul 21 at 20:33
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    @Patrice the sample idea was just an add-on, my answer was saying any support at all - in the text discussion, not just in the votes of the question - would show me credibility that the community is not biased. I have seen around 20 active people in the discussion. 3 random supporters should be the threshold, as a straightforward number that you ask for. – Lorenz Jul 21 at 20:55
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    @Lorenz so... the initial question standing a -17 + 37, WAY above the 3 in 20 you mention, wasn't enough? – Patrice Jul 22 at 15:54
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    The comments beneath my answer are not an appropriate place to discuss anything but my answer. If you have a new question, ask a new question. But note that Meta is still not a discussion forum. – Cody Gray Jul 22 at 23:11
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You can reach out to the individuals mentioned here, specially those mentioned in the Board of Directors.

They can, in the end, overturn decisions made in the day-to-day operation of the Company. If they support your point of view they might demand the changes you like to see. They have the ability to put pressure on the organization because they also control the funding.

Whether they are willing to risk losing a part of the community while satisfying another part is to be seen. This assumes they are prepared to micro-manage this. It might involve forcing changes by the Company upon the communities and that has been done before so I'm sure they can do that again.

It will be a long road but if you're convinced it helps driving business revenue up in the long run, I'm sure they are interested to listen to your take on it and suggest that direction to the company.

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