188
votes

In connection with the ongoing moderator election, we are holding a Q&A thread for the candidates. The top questions collected from an earlier thread have been compiled into this one, which shall now serve as the space for the candidates to provide their answers.

Not every question was compiled—as noted in the solicitation, we only selected the top 8 questions as submitted by the community, plus 2 pre-set questions from the company. Thank you to all of the users who submitted questions to this process! I've adjusted a few questions when that seemed appropriate but I've made an effort not to change the intent. I've also linked to the original question in these cases so that candidates can opt to answer the original phrasing of the question if they wish.

As a candidate, your job is simple: post a single answer to this question, quoting each question followed by your answer to it. For your convenience, I will include all of the questions in quote format with a break in between each, suitable as a template for you to insert your answers. Just copy the whole thing after the first set of three dashes. Please also include a link to your answer on your nomination post.

Once all the answers have been compiled, this will serve as a transcript for voters to view the thoughts of their candidates, and will be appropriately linked in the Election page.

Good luck to all of the candidates!


To save scrolling, here are links to the submissions from each candidate (in order of submission):

When you've completed your answer, please provide a link to it in the bulleted list immediately above. Please leave the list of links in the order of submission.


  1. The general atmosphere amongst the moderators is currently not the sweetest. A lot of them have resigned due to the issues on the site in the past year, and many others have significantly reduced their activity. COVID-19 has put pressure on our real lives, which is dragging the remaining ones down. The flag queue has been increasing, and has been higher than what it used to be in the past couple of years. In these testing times, what would you do to bring back happiness in the community, and motivate them to do more moderation tasks? Do you think you have the mettle to handle these gloomy situations, and help the Stack Overflow community bounce back on the moderation front?
  1. With all of the drama that has happened on the site in the last few months, why do you still want to run? What is it that drives you? What motivates you to still want to serve the community in good faith given your efforts will almost always go unnoticed, and that the folks you think have your back may at any point turn against you?
  1. A high rep user of the site has started to link their own library in many of their answers. Tipped off by a flag, you see that they are overtly self promoting themselves, and handle it by deleting their answers and sending them a mod message asking them to update their answers and provide affiliation. The user is arguably furious after reading your message. They then post their own version of the story on meta without giving much information, and cite that you deleted all their answers. The meta crowd, who is half informed about the situation has brought out all pitchforks, as a high rep user has been contacted. What do you do here to de-escalate the increased tensions? Additionally, do you feel that high rep users must be given more leeway than low rep users, or should the law be the same for all?
  1. How aware are you of the controversial events on the network from Q3-4 last year? Assuming you are aware, what makes you still feel you wish to nominate now? Show us you know exactly what you are doing when you are running in this election. In particular, moderators are (should be) representatives of the community and its best interests, not the company. How can you find balance in representing what is the best for community and at the same time avoid conflicting the company to the point where the company may decide to remove your privileges?

    (Edited to remove negative implications. For the original copy, see Dalija Prasnikar's original submission.)

  1. Here are two questions but you only need to answer one. It is about how you would interact on Meta.
    • Your candidate score is > 20
      Stack Overflow is moving into a new era with the next generation of developers / engineers / enthusiasts emerging. As you have a high candidate score you have been here long enough to not remember what it was like when you started here as a user (things changed, okay?). Why do you think you are the right person to guide / understand / support the upcoming community that is so much different with different needs and a different attitude? Please elaborate.
    • Your candidate score is <= 20
      Stack Overflow has a history with a vocal community, focused on quality. As you still have opportunities to develop yourself in certain aspects of moderation, you can approach problems with a new and fresh vision. How will you leverage your relative inexperience in engaging with the longstanding users and encouraging the upcoming generation in contributing to the knowledge base SO wants to be? Please elaborate.
  1. A user has replied to an increasingly heated comment chain and used an ambiguous yet colloquial word that can be gender neutral to many people, but carries an implicit male context by itself ("dude", "guys", etc.). This comment draws a few red flags, including a custom moderator flag that accuses the person of violating the pronoun code of conduct. There's nothing else flag-worthy about the comment. How would you handle this?
  1. There have been several unpopular features lately, changes in moderation policy forced prompted by SE, and a promise by the company (I am not stating this promise has been kept.) to listen to feedback from the community. Given this I have a two-part question (with the second part being the more important part in my view):
    1. What do you think a moderator's role should be when an unpopular feature is rolled out by SE?
    2. What would you, as a moderator, do when faced with a controversial decision announced by the company, one which you personally disagreed with, and felt was bad for the community at large?
  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?
  1. Do you see moderators as a cooperating team or as a collection of individuals with the "nuke" button? (Note: "nuke" is used as a general term here, referring to the fact that all actions by a moderator are binding and take effect immediately.)

    How would you handle a situation where another moderator closed/deleted/etc. a question that you feel shouldn't have been? Could you be convinced by fellow moderators to revert one of your moderating decisions (delete/close/undelete/reopen/suspend/unsuspend)?

  1. Given the trials and tribulations that Stack Overflow is facing—not just with some high profile departures from Stack Overflow moderation—what makes you believe that you'll be motivated and capable of handling the many responsibilities of moderation?

Return to the question

  • 49
    Yipes. questions 1, 2, 4, 7 and 10 - half of the questions - are directly linked to the state of SO / SE. Well, I guess that's the hot potato right now, but I certainly think those are over represented. I wish the mods a lot of luck getting through those questions; fortunately the normal operation of SO mods will not be influenced that much by the evens of the last 10 months. – Maarten Bodewes Jul 6 at 22:21
  • 16
    Not a lot of those questions seem to actually deal with good content. It's all about very much past minded. Is it appropriate to have elections now, seeing that there are still open questions from community to SO and unhandled discussions? – Icepickle Jul 6 at 22:55
  • 25
    @Maarten To be fair, most moderation policies are pretty well established at this point, so unless a candidate wants to make a deliberate stand about proactively changing or reinterpreting those, I think it's reasonable to assume that they'll be joining the existing crew and keeping many of the same policies and procedures. What really matters are the issues that the questions you've identified get at. And these do influence the normal operation of SO mods far more than you seem to think. This is a large part of what I deal with, and what is most distressing to me, as a mod. – Cody Gray Jul 7 at 3:02
  • 25
    @Icepickle It doesn't make sense to wait any longer. No "resolution" for these issues is forthcoming. They're especially thorny, with legitimate concerns on both sides. Even though we all hope things will improve, with the goal of eventually resolving, it will be a long process, not something that we can wait for before holding another moderator election. As was discussed when the election was announced, we need to hold an election now because we're very short on moderators, and it's causing very long backlogs on flag handling, etc. – Cody Gray Jul 7 at 3:04
  • 14
    As the asker of question #7, I just want to say I appreciate it being included without alteration (save to fit the format) - these last two years I may have seemed more adversarial then I wished to be. My question stands but I do appreciate the CM's work. – LinkBerest Jul 7 at 3:48
  • 9
    If someone is looking for noɥʇʎԀʎzɐɹƆ's answers, he posted them here. I found it by searching in chat and following links, but it wasn't easy. – Donald Duck Jul 11 at 19:00
  • 5
    Some stats about candidates: data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/query/1262834/…. And screenshot as data will change in future: i.stack.imgur.com/XsxzQ.png. – Qwertiy Jul 13 at 22:05
269
votes

Machavity

profile for Machavity at Stack Overflow, Q&A for professional and enthusiast programmers

  1. The general atmosphere amongst the moderators is currently not the sweetest. A lot of them have resigned due to the issues on the site in the past year, and many others have significantly reduced their activity. COVID-19 has put pressure on our real lives, which is dragging the remaining ones down. The flag queue has been increasing, and has been higher than what it used to be in the past couple of years. In these testing times, what would you do to bring back happiness in the community, and motivate them to do more moderation tasks? Do you think you have the mettle to handle these gloomy situations, and help the Stack Overflow community bounce back on the moderation front?

Yeah, the moderator team lost a lot of steam over the mass debacle. It's been noticeable with custom flags now sometimes taking multiple days to clear.

I already do this somewhat through SOCVR, where I work with other curators. I've noticed that we have a new crop of regulars and, since we turned the corner on the social drama it seems like moderation/curation is slowly coming back. I like that several moderators hang out in chat and often for no reason in particular. I hope to be as approachable. For me, at least, it helps to do moderation in a social setting.

My enthusiasm? I think SO is still a good place to find answers and to ask questions, but the job of curation and moderation never ends. Even if I don't win, I'll still be using my simpler tools and hanging out in SOCVR.

  1. With all of the drama that has happened on the site in the last few months, why do you still want to run? What is it that drives you? What motivates you to still want to serve the community in good faith given your efforts will almost always go unnoticed, and that the folks you think have your back may at any point turn against you?

As I noted above, we turned a corner in Feb. While Shog9's loss is a definite blow, I have noticed Catija stepping up and she seems to really be trying on that front. As to SO... so far it seems that a hard lesson has been learned (even if one of the results was unsatisfactory). I doubt anyone (even the employees who instigated it) want to go through that again. I'm sure there was a hefty legal bill as well. Remember, the turmoil was bad for business, and SO's product is the community. The new Community Management director seems to get that.

If they're willing to make an effort, I think it's worth a try to make one from our end.

  1. A high rep user of the site has started to link their own library in many of their answers. Tipped off by a flag, you see that they are overtly self promoting themselves, and handle it by deleting their answers and sending them a mod message asking them to update their answers and provide affiliation. The user is arguably furious after reading your message. They then post their own version of the story on meta without giving much information, and cite that you deleted all their answers. The meta crowd, who is half informed about the situation has brought out all pitchforks, as a high rep user has been contacted. What do you do here to de-escalate the increased tensions? Additionally, do you feel that high rep users must be given more leeway than low rep users, or should the law be the same for all?

I hang out in a place where everything is documented. Everything. Meta doesn't seem to have a high tolerance for people who flout the rules and if someone wants to start something on Meta, I'm more than happy to finish it. Of all the things that have changed, Meta's respect for moderators has stayed the same. I don't think high-rep spam is terribly different from low-rep spam.

As to de-escalation, it depends on why it escalated. If the user simply soap-boxes on their reputation, I'm not going to have much sympathy. If they simply missed the promotion rules, I already try to help people know where they went wrong.

  1. How aware are you of the controversial events on the network from Q3-4 last year? Assuming you are aware, what makes you still feel you wish to nominate now? Show us you know exactly what you are doing when you are running in this election. In particular, moderators are (should be) representatives of the community and its best interests, not the company. How can you find balance in representing what is the best for community and at the same time avoid conflicting the company to the point where the company may decide to remove your privileges?

    (Edited to remove negative implications. For the original copy, see Dalija Prasnikar's original submission.)

I touched on this some in #2 but let me elaborate. There was very nearly a large-scale moderation strike. I know because SOCVR (of which which I am a Room Owner) voted to strike if it came to that. And just in case it wasn't clear, I was most decidedly not happy about what happened. If it ever came down to another situation like that again, I would seriously consider my options.

But we have to start somewhere. I'd rather be a voice inside, trying to argue for positive change (and potentially failing) than to sit back and let the community just fragment and disperse.

  1. Here are two questions but you only need to answer one. It is about how you would interact on Meta.
    • Your candidate score is > 20
      Stack Overflow is moving into a new era with the next generation of developers / engineers / enthusiasts emerging. As you have a high candidate score you have been here long enough to not remember what it was like when you started here as a user (things changed, okay?). Why do you think you are the right person to guide / understand / support the upcoming community that is so much different with different needs and a different attitude? Please elaborate.
    • Your candidate score is <= 20
      Stack Overflow has a history with a vocal community, focused on quality. As you still have opportunities to develop yourself in certain aspects of moderation, you can approach problems with a new and fresh vision. How will you leverage your relative inexperience in engaging with the longstanding users and encouraging the upcoming generation in contributing to the knowledge base SO wants to be? Please elaborate.

As with #1, I intend to be approachable. I think we've lost here on SO is a sense of community. There was a time where CMs and Mods walked among people as a matter of course. It's been slow, but I've started to see things trending upward in that regard. Visible moderators help the community.

  1. A user has replied to an increasingly heated comment chain and used an ambiguous yet colloquial word that can be gender neutral to many people, but carries an implicit male context by itself ("dude", "guys", etc.). This comment draws a few red flags, including a custom moderator flag that accuses the person of violating the pronoun code of conduct. There's nothing else flag-worthy about the comment. How would you handle this?

Catija's post further down says

There are still edge cases that aren't clear to me.

There always will be. Use your common sense, be nice, presume good faith but be prepared to revise that assumption in the face of the evidence, and you are unlikely to go too far wrong.

Good faith (or assuming good intent) is the main key here. I have a low tolerance for trolling of any sort and I'm in agreement with the CoC that we shouldn't allow people to start fights over pronouns or verbiage.

There's two possible outcomes

  1. It's straight-up trolling from the poster. The flag should be sustained.
  2. The flagger(s) haven't really haven't made an issue of gender (or it's not clear the users have expressed a gender preference). I'd be inclined to decline the red flags and at least find out what's going on with the custom one. As long as there's no clear bad faith going on, I wouldn't punish the user. Probably just let them all know to calm down and maybe pick better verbiage next time.
  1. There have been several unpopular features lately, changes in moderation policy forced prompted by SE, and a promise by the company (I am not stating this promise has been kept.) to listen to feedback from the community. Given this I have a two-part question (with the second part being the more important part in my view):
    1. What do you think a moderator's role should be when an unpopular feature is rolled out by SE?
    2. What would you, as a moderator, do when faced with a controversial decision announced by the company, one which you personally disagreed with, and felt was bad for the community at large?
  1. As a moderator, I don't lose my voice. In fact moderators vocally disagree with SO a lot. I know of multiple mods I respect who speak out when they feel something isn't right. But sometimes unpopular things are necessary. We can't just expect to get our way either.
  2. Post on MSO and MSE about it. I strongly believe in the Meta process. I have a long history of using both to express myself.
  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

I always believe in reaching out to people first. Simple conversations can have profound effects. However I know of more than a few users who not only fit this bill, but are extremely high maintenance. In fact, many of these users wound up banned for increasingly long times. It's never a good thing, but if necessary, the banhammer is there.

  1. Do you see moderators as a cooperating team or as a collection of individuals with the "nuke" button? (Note: "nuke" is used as a general term here, referring to the fact that all actions by a moderator are binding and take effect immediately.)

    How would you handle a situation where another moderator closed/deleted/etc. a question that you feel shouldn't have been? Could you be convinced by fellow moderators to revert one of your moderating decisions (delete/close/undelete/reopen/suspend/unsuspend)?

I've always been open to correction. In fact, if you see me doing something wrong, feel free to call me out! I don't expect that the Mod team is one big happy family, but that they are calm and thoughtful folks who want what's best for the site. I know there are chat rooms and such they use, and I hope to avail myself of them whenever they disagree with me, or vice versa.

  1. Given the trials and tribulations that Stack Overflow is facing—not just with some high profile departures from Stack Overflow moderation—what makes you believe that you'll be motivated and capable of handling the many responsibilities of moderation?

I still care for the community. I've always done reviews here and around SE. I suspect part of what helped fuel the mass departures is burnout (which is what I tried to caution SE about in the early days of Monicagate). Even if they had reinstated her, I think there still would have been lots of departures, where it was the proverbial straw that broke the camel's back.

One thing I do is pace myself. I don't have to do every review queue to completion or use every vote I have every day. You'll hit your limit really quick. The long term moderators seem to handle things here and there. It sounds counter-intuitive, but it also keeps churn low. 30 minutes a day average should be easily doable.


Return to the question

  • 42
    Fro a moment I though there will be no candidates worth voting for ;) Thank you for throwing your hat in. – Dalija Prasnikar Jul 7 at 18:53
  • 6
    While I think you would be good, at least from the interactions I've had with you before, these answers seem kind of... subdued? I'm not really sure I understand your motivation or your optimism – Michael Jul 7 at 19:02
  • 3
    @Michael I don't want to write a novel, per se, but I did try to address your question with an edit. – Machavity Jul 7 at 19:15
  • 1
    Would you (or could you) continue to be an SOCVR Room Owner were you to be awarded the diamond? – Adrian Mole Jul 7 at 20:22
  • 16
    @AdrianMole Copied from last year's nomination: I don't see any conflict of interest there. I would expect I'll be making far fewer CVs from myself and not voting on the queue as much, but mostly I keep the rules and run cleanup. Even Bhargav has enforced rules and he's never been an RO. If the other ROs asked me to step down I would. If there were moderator action needed against the SOCVR room itself (I've never seen that happen) I would have to recuse myself from that, obviously. – Machavity Jul 7 at 20:24
  • 7
    Glad to see you running again this year. – chevybow Jul 7 at 20:26
  • 3
    I don't feel that you directly answered the first three questions. There are perhaps implied or subtle answers in there. Did you chose to not give straight answers here? If so, why? Being approachable isn't the same as being helpful if a user approaching you needs a straight answer. – Scratte Jul 9 at 5:52
  • 1
    that's looking good for you this year :) – Jean-François Fabre Jul 9 at 11:11
  • 3
    @Scratte Fair enough. I think I could have been more pointed so I made an edit to those 3. – Machavity Jul 9 at 12:52
  • 1
    If you're elected, would you pick up the moderator side of the tag burnination effort that Bhargav Rao♦ used to do? – Dan Is Fiddling By Firelight Jul 9 at 21:00
  • 3
    @DanIsFiddlingByFirelight Depends on the community, but it does seem like there's more interest in restarting burninations. Even Jon Clements (who suggested the Trogdor project to clean up the burnination list) has wanted to start running the burnination bot. Provided there's enough people to participate, I am willing to help run them. – Machavity Jul 9 at 22:45
  • 1
    we'd rather get some help in custom flags, IMHO. Custom flags queue is a bottomless well. – Jean-François Fabre Jul 10 at 7:01
  • 2
    Burnination could be a whole lot easier, but it's been tied to the notion of "if you clean up one thing, you're responsible for cleaning up everything," which makes otherwise routine burninations of worthless flags an excruciating process. I'm in the "incremental improvements are still improvements" camp. If we had a Trogdor button, those posts could be sent into one of the queues for review, as bad tags are almost always an indicator of other problems with the posts so tagged. But those other problems should not prevent tags from being summarily dispatched. – Robert Harvey Jul 10 at 22:43
  • 5
    @NeonMan Politics are off-topic on SO. Maybe you mean something else? Your description isn't very clear to me. – TylerH Jul 14 at 13:14
  • 1
    @IslamEl-Rougy Not sure how that's relevant at all to this election, or how activity on a Politics SE site can be "too political"... it's in the very essence of the act. – TylerH Jul 15 at 16:17
163
votes

Makyen

profile for Makyen at Stack Overflow, Q&A for professional and enthusiast programmers

  1. The general atmosphere amongst the moderators is currently not the sweetest. A lot of them have resigned due to the issues on the site in the past year, and many others have significantly reduced their activity. COVID-19 has put pressure on our real lives, which is dragging the remaining ones down. The flag queue has been increasing, and has been higher than what it used to be in the past couple of years. In these testing times, what would you do to bring back happiness in the community, and motivate them to do more moderation tasks? Do you think you have the mettle to handle these gloomy situations, and help the Stack Overflow community bounce back on the moderation front?

This question is both asking an implicit "how do you think you can improve morale among moderators to improve their motivation to work the flag queue" and the explicit question about how to motivate the community to do more moderation.

For both situations, one of the more important things is to be an example of the behavior you desire to see. So, me putting out the effort and being present to do the tasks, is, of course, very important.

Beyond that, there are literally hundreds, if not thousands, of books devoted to team dynamics, much of which can be applicable to the community at large. So, a comprehensive answer to this question is way too much for this questionnaire.

However, for the other moderators, I'd begin by listening to their concerns, including those beyond the world-global and community-global issues of which we are all aware.

For both the moderator team and community, one of the typical ways to restore morale is for the group to establish for itself smaller/closer targets which are both beneficial and can be accomplished with relative ease and a high probability of success. Once one is complete, you can build on that success with the next task, also selected by the group to be likely to produce a positive result.

For the moderators, I don't have enough information about the moderator team, as a team, to make a specific suggestion, nor do I know what, if anything, has already been tried. Tossing out suggestions without knowing more could easily be counterproductive. I'd also point out that I'm nominating myself to be a member of the moderator team, not to come in and be its savior or leader.

For the community, the organized moderation projects have typically been burninations. Those could be started up again, beginning with some tags with not that many questions. Doing so could get more people interested in doing moderation tasks and give some successes, which people can feel good about.

  1. With all of the drama that has happened on the site in the last few months, why do you still want to run? What is it that drives you? What motivates you to still want to serve the community in good faith given your efforts will almost always go unnoticed, and that the folks you think have your back may at any point turn against you?

For me, a large part of what drives me is service and duty to others. I've always been that way. So, the short answer to "why do you still want to run?" is that I desire to help the community. Being a moderator is the most effective way for me to do that.

Personally, I found the issues with Stack Exchange over the last year to be very demotivating with respect to the company, but I always felt the urge to help the people in the community. I did contemplate discontinuing my efforts here, but continued to put in large amounts of time and effort, because the people: the community; the other moderators, both elected and those doing user-level moderation; and the greater community we help by building this repository of questions and answers, are what matter to me, rather than the company.

There was a period of months last year during which my answer to "do you want be a moderator?" would have been "no, thank you", or some much stronger negative statement. However, we've seen the company turn things around to a significant extent, even if there have been some stumbles along the way.

At this point, I believe the company really is working to change, and that we should work with them to help make that change stick.

  1. A high rep user of the site has started to link their own library in many of their answers. Tipped off by a flag, you see that they are overtly self promoting themselves, and handle it by deleting their answers and sending them a mod message asking them to update their answers and provide affiliation. The user is arguably furious after reading your message. They then post their own version of the story on meta without giving much information, and cite that you deleted all their answers. The meta crowd, who is half informed about the situation has brought out all pitchforks, as a high rep user has been contacted. What do you do here to de-escalate the increased tensions?

I would write up an answer to the meta question explaining the accurate details of what happened (to the level to which it's permitted to share). Doing so will allow people on meta see a more accurate picture of the situation. I'd explain in the answer how the user was violating our self-promotion guidelines and that the user's answers were deleted only until such time as the user modifies their answers to fit within the guidelines. I'd provide explanation/responses to people who have further comments and issues. Most such situations can be deescalated by providing a clearer picture of what happened, and reinforcing to the OP that there is a path to their answers being undeleted, which also allows them to make further contributions.

For the future, I'd work on the wording of the initial message to the user. It's quite likely a situation similar to what instigated this scenario will happen in the future, which will require a similar message. While such messages need to communicate the requirements, they should, ideally, do that in a way that doesn't escalate the situation. While there's no message which will prevent every person from being upset over the situation, it's likely the text used could make it less likely that a user will be furious.

Additionally, do you feel that high rep users must be given more leeway than low rep users, or should the law be the same for all?

The policies and guidelines apply equally to all users. Everyone must interact with Stack Overflow in compliance with them.

Within the context of this question (i.e. posts being spam because of the user linking to their own content without disclosing their affiliation, or over promoting), users with other beneficial contributions (even if that user is a 1 rep user, but with some other constructive questions and/or answers that are not linking to their own content) are given a bit more leeway than users with no contributions other than those promoting their site/product/library/etc. The leeway given is in additional time to edit their posts, or the moderator spending more time editing disclosure into the posts for them.

The reason for this is that the user has a track record of the type of behavior we want to see here on Stack Overflow. It's human nature to trust someone more when that person has a history of doing things you want to see done. You trust them to be more likely to continue to do the things you think are good. You trust more that when they do things that are not appropriate, that such things are more likely to be a mistake, or that the person is more likely to return to doing things appropriately with a little guidance.

Regardless of that extra leeway, it doesn't mean that users with substantial contributions don't have to comply with the policies and guidelines on the site.

  1. How aware are you of the controversial events on the network from Q3-4 last year? Assuming you are aware, what makes you still feel you wish to nominate now? Show us you know exactly what you are doing when you are running in this election. In particular, moderators are (should be) representatives of the community and its best interests, not the company. How can you find balance in representing what is the best for community and at the same time avoid conflicting the company to the point where the company may decide to remove your privileges?

I'm very aware of what happened last year. However, the only post I made about one of the issues was just prior to the major blow-up surrounding Monica. My answer focused on a technical/legal aspect, rather than the human side of the plethora of issues. I read all of the posts that were involved, including all answers on the questions, and left comments on a reasonable number of them. I did not write another answer, because by the time I would see the next new question/chapter, there were already answers which voiced positions very similar to what I would have said. Just piling on and posting yet another answer saying basically the same thing would not have been productive.

There is no one answer to finding balance between representing the community while not dramatically conflicting with the company. The priority is that a moderator's job includes representing the community. Doing that while not generating dramatic conflict with the company is a matter of interpersonal relationships. I consider myself fairly good at conflict resolution and avoiding unnecessary escalation, while still reaching a resolution that's acceptable to the parties involved. How, exactly, to do that is much too broad of a topic for an answer to this questionnaire. In general, doing so routinely involves listening to the concerns of the other side; putting yourself in their position, in order to understand how things look from their point of view; and working to find a resolution that is mutually acceptable.

The company appears to have been on the path towards changing for a while now. At this point, I feel it's reasonable to be giving the company the chance to do so.

[Note: Well, OK, I should be more accurate and say I spent a huge amount of time reading a large number of questions and their answers on MSO, MSE, and other site specific Metas. I believe I read the significant majority of posts involved, but I don't think anyone can accurately say they read all of them.]

  1. Here are two questions but you only need to answer one. It is about how you would interact on Meta.
    • Your candidate score is > 20
      Stack Overflow is moving into a new era with the next generation of developers / engineers / enthusiasts emerging. As you have a high candidate score you have been here long enough to not remember what it was like when you started here as a user (things changed, okay?). Why do you think you are the right person to guide / understand / support the upcoming community that is so much different with different needs and a different attitude? Please elaborate.

I feel the contributions of new users are as important as the contributions we get from our established users. While there may be aspects of my learning about interacting with the site which I've forgotten, I usually find it's very easy to mentally put myself in other people's position in order to explore their point of view and understand them better. In fact, looking at a problem from the other person's point of view is an ingrained part of how I approach issues.

While good contributions should be encouraged from all users, and newer users guided towards positive contributions, that doesn't mean we should drop our standards of quality. The end result of dispensing with our standards of quality is the eventual death of Stack Overflow, as it becomes increasingly difficult to get the problem solutions which are the primary thing people come here for.

  1. A user has replied to an increasingly heated comment chain and used an ambiguous yet colloquial word that can be gender neutral to many people, but carries an implicit male context by itself ("dude", "guys", etc.). This comment draws a few red flags, including a custom moderator flag that accuses the person of violating the pronoun code of conduct. There's nothing else flag-worthy about the comment. How would you handle this?

From the description, this appears to be a case where the user was not trolling. While I would keep the possibility in mind that it might have been trolling, I'm answering this from the point of view implied in the question, which is that the user's use of gendered colloquial language was done without knowing how the use of those terms isn't inclusive.

It's likely that a large portion of the "increasingly heated comment chain" has little or no value to be retained. So, clean up the comments as much as reasonable, including the one which was getting flags. Allow the involved users to cool down.

As to the implicitly gendered speech: Assume good faith from the user; communicate with them; direct them to resources explaining the issues surrounding such speech; suggest that they be more careful in their choice of wording. Make a note that they have been made aware of the the issues.

  1. There have been several unpopular features lately, changes in moderation policy forced prompted by SE, and a promise by the company (I am not stating this promise has been kept.) to listen to feedback from the community. Given this I have a two-part question (with the second part being the more important part in my view):
    1. What do you think a moderator's role should be when an unpopular feature is rolled out by SE?
    2. What would you, as a moderator, do when faced with a controversial decision announced by the company, one which you personally disagreed with, and felt was bad for the community at large?

Moderators have at least as much voice as any other user, but shouldn't use their position to artificially incite more conflict between the community and the company. Moderators can, and do, post about the issues surrounding the new feature on MSO and MSE. Moderators also have a bit more access to staff and might be able to discuss it with them in a venue which was not so emotionally charged as Meta sometimes becomes.

In general, use the available communication channels to communicate to the company that there are significant issues with what happened and that a different direction would be better. So far, the Meta process and chats between users have seemed to be effective in the new company environment.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

The goal is to get the user to change the part of their behavior which is disruptive. There's a process for this: begin with communication: explain what's inappropriate; suggest ways the user could act which will generate better outcomes. If the user doesn't change their behavior, then a series of increasingly severe sanctions can be imposed, until such time as the behavior changes. If the user is unwilling/able to change, then they may end up suspended for a significant amount of time.

  1. Do you see moderators as a cooperating team or as a collection of individuals with the "nuke" button? (Note: "nuke" is used as a general term here, referring to the fact that all actions by a moderator are binding and take effect immediately.)

I see the moderators as a team. A group of people is usually significantly more effective if they act in ways that complement each other's strengths, rather than at cross-purposes, or even just independently.

How would you handle a situation where another moderator closed/deleted/etc. a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

Discuss it with them, so we reach mutual agreement as to what to do.

Could you be convinced by fellow moderators to revert one of your moderating decisions (delete/close/undelete/reopen/suspend/unsuspend)?

Of course, I could be convinced that an action I took was inappropriate, or even just not the best solution. If so, take responsibility for my actions; change/correct what was done as much as possible; if it caused harm, apologize and make amends to the extent possible/reasonable; and learn from the experience, so it doesn't happen again.

  1. Given the trials and tribulations that Stack Overflow is facing—not just with some high profile departures from Stack Overflow moderation—what makes you believe that you'll be motivated and capable of handling the many responsibilities of moderation?

I have a long history of sticking with things once I commit to them, particularly when they involve a duty or service to others. I find it hard to believe that I wouldn't treat the responsibility of being a moderator similarly, even if it became unpleasant. I also have a strong tendency to put in more time and effort than is strictly required. Given that I'm around SO/SE quite a bit, it would take considerable effort for me to not do moderation work.


Return to the question

  • 3
    "Users who have beneficial contributions to the site should be given more leeway than those who have no beneficial contributions" Does that mean you would apply a lesser penalty to a high-rep user? In what way would you give them more leeway? – Dharman Jul 11 at 15:17
  • 4
    @Dharman I did not know the meaning of 'leeway', but I'm here after learning what the word means - "the amount of freedom to move or act that is available." The quoted statement simply highlighted a difference between contributing and non-contributing users, and just like contributing users are given more privileges on the site, they implicitly have the leeway and that's a trap in the question, which Makyen did not fall into. – Ardent Coder Jul 11 at 17:10
  • 3
    Having said that, he later elaborated upon this statement in that paragraph - "However, that doesn't mean that on a matter of policy there should be different treatment between a user with 100k reputation and a user with 1 reputation [...]" - which makes it quite evident that he will not discriminate users while giving a so called 'penalty'. – Ardent Coder Jul 11 at 17:10
  • 11
    @Dharman What I meant was largely similar to what you wrote in response to the same question. If the user is providing, or trying to provide, positive contributions, then work with and guide the user towards contributing within the policies and guidelines we have for the site. While I have respect for the effort which a user has put into the site to have 100k rep, that doesn't mean they get lesser penalties than a new user who is also contributing positively, or just honestly trying to do so. Both must be in compliance with the policies and guidelines. – Makyen Jul 11 at 18:00
  • 6
    On a post which is lacking disclosure of affiliation, my choice to edit in disclosure, rather than deleting and having them fix it up themselves, will be primarily based on my impression of their intent with the post (e.g. does it look like their intent was primarily to promote their thing, or to give a good answer; how many similar answers did they post; how fast; are they good answers without the promotion), and how sure I am of the nature of their affiliation (e.g. own it? just work on it/work for the company? etc.), as that will inform the wording used for disclosing their affiliation. – Makyen Jul 11 at 18:00
  • 2
    @ArdentCoder, And that's the problem. The 'trust' factor is inherently measured by reputation, not genuine ability, experience, or interest. Hence the meta posts about users who've flashed their way to 3k on a hot tag, bumble into the review queues (especially the close-vote queue) and quickly get review banned, leaving a mess behind. I understand that the culture here prefers higher rep users and that this will likely never change, even if it is in the best interests of the site moderation-wise for it change. 'Established' does not necessarily equal 'high rep'. This is bordering on off-topic. – ouflak Jul 11 at 18:40
  • 6
    @ouflak Consider an example: Someone posts an answer consisting solely of "djkslhaflkjsdfhalks" or similar nonsense (this happens all the time, in fact). If the answer comes from a brand-new unregistered 1-rep user, the user is almost certainly just being disruptive and standard procedure would be to delete the post as R/A, nuke the account, and feed it into SpamRam so that they would quickly get an IP-level block if they recreate their account and keep posting nonsense. (1/2) – NobodyNada Jul 11 at 20:58
  • 13
    However, if the exact same answer was posted by, say, Jon Skeet, that would be a wildly inappropriate course of action. Because of the hundreds of thousands of quality contributions he's made to the site, we could safely assume that it was a one-time cat-on-keyboard accident, and it wouldn't make sense to penalize him so harshly. It doesn't mean that Jon Skeet is allowed to post "djkslhaflkjsdfhalks" -- it would still be deleted right away, of course -- but it does mean we'd give him the benefit of the doubt to a greater extent than we would a 1-rep user. (2/2) – NobodyNada Jul 11 at 20:58
  • 12
    @NobodyNada That is a very good example. But I'll just note that it doesn't even have to be that stark of a contrast. As a moderator, I'd certainly give Jon Skeet the benefit of the doubt if he posted gibberish, but I'd give the same benefit of the doubt to a 100-rep user who had posted a couple of good questions/answers in the past. It's just brand-new users who we tend to assume are probably spammers. And, frankly, even if we guess wrong, it's better for them if we destroy the account and let them start fresh with a clean slate. – Cody Gray Jul 12 at 5:50
  • 8
    I am very glad you decided to run. You are posed, understanding, patient and yet, decision wise, sharp. I really appreciate your knowledge of every aspect of SO/SE rules. Your involvement in and contributions (userscripts, SOCVR, Charcoal, etc..) to SO community are indubitably valuable. I believe you would be a very wise and great moderator. – Vega Jul 12 at 7:23
  • 2
    @Makoto I'd have to stop visiting SO/SE. After > 1500 consecutive days, SO is a considerable fixture in my life. It'd be a significant disturbance for me to stop. As to breaking, I've burned out once, quite some time ago. What it took was >6 years of averaging over 90h/week, then being told I wasn't permitted to take any vacation until the end of the next 2–3 year project, despite having previously scheduled vacation for after the just ended project and before the next began; and being told I'd loose any additional accrued vacation, because I was already at the max permitted vacation accrual. – Makyen Jul 13 at 16:02
  • 2
    However, Stack Exchange has already expended a large part of my willingness to accept egregious actions on their part. If they were to do, again, something similar to what happened to Monica, I would be very hard pressed to justify continuing to support them. They would have demonstrated that not only were they willing to do something like that, which I consider extremely inappropriate, but that they were willing to do it, again, after having explicitly said they wouldn't, having said they were changing, and after they've understood the consequences of doing something like that. – Makyen Jul 13 at 16:03
  • 6
    Having had north of 2200 consecutive days of Meta myself before taking a break, I think that you're at least in the right head space in terms of what it means to dedicate yourself to something like this. I also think you have had a winter or two experiencing what frustration and burn out is like, and I have a distinct impression that you've got more than enough of a spine to stand up for something you believe in. Godspeed. – Makoto Jul 13 at 16:12
  • 4
    @ouflak I didn't want you to feel people we ganging up on you. What other people have explained here is largely what I was trying to convey in what I wrote. Basically, the "leeway" isn't about the user having 1 rep or 100k rep. It's about the user having some track record of being here to provide benefit to the site and not being here just to promote their thing, whatever that thing is. I realized the way I wrote that portion of my answer tried to explain that from the negative position, which could easily not convey what I intended. I've rewritten that section. I hope it's more clear. – Makyen Jul 14 at 22:26
  • 3
    Appreciated. I didn't want this to go too far off topic, so I just bailed from the conversation. The example that was used to counter my point was black-and-white. There was no 'leeway' in @NobodyNada's example. Everybody would respond to that situation the same, and be correct. It's the marginal situations, where there is true doubt, that 'leeway' comes into play. Since I figured it might take up another ten comments to get that point across, I thought, "This is about Makyen and his opinions, not me and mine". So Thanks for that. My skin is fortunately thick enough to let things slide. – ouflak Jul 15 at 7:17
149
votes

Travis J

profile for Travis J at Stack Overflow, Q&A for professional and enthusiast programmers

I am Travis J, you may have seen me around. I am mostly running to make sure that things stay in good hands, and have been very impressed thus far with previously elected moderators. Hopefully this nomination also serves as incentive for some healthy competition :)

  1. The general atmosphere amongst the moderators is currently not the sweetest. A lot of them have resigned due to the issues on the site in the past year, and many others have significantly reduced their activity. COVID-19 has put pressure on our real lives, which is dragging the remaining ones down. The flag queue has been increasing, and has been higher than what it used to be in the past couple of years. In these testing times, what would you do to bring back happiness in the community, and motivate them to do more moderation tasks? Do you think you have the mettle to handle these gloomy situations, and help the Stack Overflow community bounce back on the moderation front?

While focused, I am always as positive as possible. I try to be an adder, always bringing suggestions or support to situations. What we need is unity in these times, and that is where you will find me.

I will always focus on encouraging users of all strata to ensure they are in a comfortable environment. We should be aiming at providing quality content while feeling safe doing so; both on the content creation end, and on the content curation end.

I have the mettle.

  1. With all of the drama that has happened on the site in the last few months, why do you still want to run? What is it that drives you? What motivates you to still want to serve the community in good faith given your efforts will almost always go unnoticed, and that the folks you think have your back may at any point turn against you?

I am not here for drama, although I am very aware of it. As an avid reader of meta, I have read every blog post, off site resource, listened to podcasts, seen related youtube videos, and closely followed the on site question and answer dialogues.

I am here to help people. I solely want to give back to the community, and empower enthusiastic people towards improving their knowledge and abilities. While there is a corporate entity involved, I am keenly aware of Jeff Atwood's statement way back when: Stack Overflow is you; and it is the us I am here for.

  1. A high rep user of the site has started to link their own library in many of their answers. Tipped off by a flag, you see that they are overtly self promoting themselves, and handle it by deleting their answers and sending them a mod message asking them to update their answers and provide affiliation. The user is arguably furious after reading your message. They then post their own version of the story on meta without giving much information, and cite that you deleted all their answers. The meta crowd, who is half informed about the situation has brought out all pitchforks, as a high rep user has been contacted. What do you do here to de-escalate the increased tensions? Additionally, do you feel that high rep users must be given more leeway than low rep users, or should the law be the same for all?

I wouldn't have deleted their answers. I would have asked them to edit them. If they didn't, I would edit them. If they then were intent on leaving the advertising, I would delete them. If all of that happened, and it washed out into meta, I would explain what happened. Perhaps there is a new desire for advertising at that point, and I was wrong. Who knows, we will figure it out. The meta crowd is generally aimed at improving things, so as long as they feel things improved they will be okay. If not, maybe something needs to change so things can improve.

As for high rep versus low rep, I don't really see much difference. We are all here abiding by the same rules, and I think that is a fair thing to ask of everyone.

  1. How aware are you of the controversial events on the network from Q3-4 last year? Assuming you are aware, what makes you still feel you wish to nominate now? Show us you know exactly what you are doing when you are running in this election. In particular, moderators are (should be) representatives of the community and its best interests, not the company. How can you find balance in representing what is the best for community and at the same time avoid conflicting the company to the point where the company may decide to remove your privileges?

    (Edited to remove negative implications. For the original copy, see Dalija Prasnikar's original submission.)

Intimately aware, as noted in answer #2. Mostly similar response to the opening of this, as I said, I am here for you, and for us.

I am not employed by Stack Overflow, nor am I affiliated with them or any of their counterparts or investors. I will act in my own interests based on helping as many people as possible here at the site. I enjoy helping people solve problems and self educate.

If there is an issue with corporate, I am also very informed. I have several law firms on retainer, I run two companies, and employ over 100 people. As noted, I will act in my own interests in order to help the community. If helping the company is a byproduct, then I am okay with that; something has to keep the lights on.

  1. Here are two questions but you only need to answer one. It is about how you would interact on Meta.
    • Your candidate score is > 20
      Stack Overflow is moving into a new era with the next generation of developers / engineers / enthusiasts emerging. As you have a high candidate score you have been here long enough to not remember what it was like when you started here as a user (things changed, okay?). Why do you think you are the right person to guide / understand / support the upcoming community that is so much different with different needs and a different attitude? Please elaborate.
    • Your candidate score is <= 20
      Stack Overflow has a history with a vocal community, focused on quality. As you still have opportunities to develop yourself in certain aspects of moderation, you can approach problems with a new and fresh vision. How will you leverage your relative inexperience in engaging with the longstanding users and encouraging the upcoming generation in contributing to the knowledge base SO wants to be? Please elaborate.

My candidate score is more than 20, and let me just say this, the next generation of people entering technology is going to be amazing. They have been supported from such a young age in many different avenues of STEM, and I am really looking forward to them coming into the field. I have done a lot of work with local universities and colleges, am a donor to a local college, keep in touch with the Dean of the Computer Science department here locally, and my wife teaches 1st-12th grade depending on where she gets placed per year.

Besides, I am not that old, come on 🤣🤣

  1. A user has replied to an increasingly heated comment chain and used an ambiguous yet colloquial word that can be gender neutral to many people, but carries an implicit male context by itself ("dude", "guys", etc.). This comment draws a few red flags, including a custom moderator flag that accuses the person of violating the pronoun code of conduct. There's nothing else flag-worthy about the comment. How would you handle this?

It really depends on the context and history of the comment and user. I may delete it, and message the user to gently request they be aware of the history of the pronoun situation at the site and try to abide by it going forward. I may edit it to be gender neutral and let it stand if there was enough content worth saving in there. If there was a pattern or the context was truly meant to be disruptive then some version of escalation would arise.

As far as remedies, intent is very important in these situations, and so is making everyone feel that the situation was handled fairly.

  1. There have been several unpopular features lately, changes in moderation policy forced prompted by SE, and a promise by the company (I am not stating this promise has been kept.) to listen to feedback from the community. Given this I have a two-part question (with the second part being the more important part in my view):
    1. What do you think a moderator's role should be when an unpopular feature is rolled out by SE?
    2. What would you, as a moderator, do when faced with a controversial decision announced by the company, one which you personally disagreed with, and felt was bad for the community at large?

It isn't my role to be product support for the company, they have people who are capable of that. It is their fault that they cannot properly respond to users on a wide scale basis as a result of having too many duplicate conversations reporting issues on many metas at once.

If someone has a particular issue with me personally using the feature, then I would definitely address that with them and try to make sure that it was being used properly and fairly. I will not use features if I feel they are immoral, regardless of their design.

If something is wrong, or out of place, or potentially a problem for the community, you will see it in my meta post, the moment I notice it; or you will see my input on it if someone else posts first.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Open a chat window, have a conversation, figure it out. I would assume good intentions.

If this is still a problem today, then I am assuming that the current set of moderators was perhaps unable to solve this issue with this user? There is probably an active set of escalation in progress in that case and I would defer to whoever was already handling it if they were still interested in managing that situation.

  1. Do you see moderators as a cooperating team or as a collection of individuals with the "nuke" button? (Note: "nuke" is used as a general term here, referring to the fact that all actions by a moderator are binding and take effect immediately.)

    How would you handle a situation where another moderator closed/deleted/etc. a question that you feel shouldn't have been? Could you be convinced by fellow moderators to revert one of your moderating decisions (delete/close/undelete/reopen/suspend/unsuspend)?

I mean, both really. We will obviously all cooperate in a wide variety of issues, but that doesn't mean we wont also be individually nuking spam and x-rated content with impunity.

I have seen almost every possible situation here. If I was confused, I would start a meta post for consensus. I have done that dozens of times, and I am fairly in tune with consensus, and so are the existing moderators. I do not really see this as being an issue at all, and believe we will all agree a vast majority of the times. I do not intend to go about questioning other's decisions, and will work to help solve problems that need solving, not creating problems from already solved issues.

  1. Given the trials and tribulations that Stack Overflow is facing—not just with some high profile departures from Stack Overflow moderation—what makes you believe that you'll be motivated and capable of handling the many responsibilities of moderation?

I want to help retain the users we have, and make any progress towards improving that I can be a part of. I feel like given my existing skill set, I can help drive the platform towards a place where users feel more supported while at the same time ensuring that the company also feels their goals are being achieved.


Return to the question

  • I would like you to elaborate more on #10. How would you retain the users you have? How does this keep you motivated? – Makoto Jul 7 at 23:12
  • 1
    @Makoto - Being motivated isn't really an issue, I am a disciplined long term thinker. I will be motivated from seeing the platform succeed, and I will be motivated to double down from seeing it decline. Retaining users is really all about reducing friction, and the primary source of friction is in the closure system. I will work closely with the other moderators to ensure that the current set of close reasons that is in use is producing as little friction as possible, because in my opinion that is one of the essential ways to keep curators and creators both comfortable using the platform. – Travis J Jul 7 at 23:45
  • With regards to the closure set, I feel like the recent iteration, in combination with the 3 close vote change, has made real progress in reducing friction for the exchange. I think that Cody Gray has also been influential in assisting with the verbiage for the close reasons, and so I would probably confer with him. As it stands, it seems like the close reason set is in a fairly good place, which hasn't really been the case for quite some time. – Travis J Jul 7 at 23:47
  • 3
    Hmm. I'm concerned that you're marching down a path of burn-out like this, but some corner of my mind is going to remain optimistic for your sake. – Makoto Jul 7 at 23:48
  • haha thanks for the confidence :) burn out is certainly something to be aware of, but the tech community as a whole (even outside of the exchange) is something I am very passionate about, and that really helps to keep me interested in being involved where I can be helpful – Travis J Jul 7 at 23:50
  • 25
    Burn out is something I worry about a lot for myself. Somehow, it’s easier when you have the privileges to actually make a difference. I would love to improve the wording around the close reasons (some of the most recent changes were major regressions in my opinion); I’ve been planning that for a while, but I’ve just been crazy busy with work, and that shows no sign if letting up. Mod election results notwithstanding, if you want to workshop on that at any time with me, and especially take the lead on getting buy-in from the larger community, you’re more than welcome to reach out, Travis. – Cody Gray Jul 8 at 0:00
  • Thanks Cody, I feel like a lot of my feedback has been heard or reviewed by the team, not sure internally who played which exact role in all of the updates. I had remembered you commenting on some of the revisions so I was under the impression you had been involved in some of the edits. Right now though, as I said a little earlier, I really do believe that overall the closure system is in a good place. Going through the tooling to see what we as a community here can do to edit those reasons or adjust the list would definitely be something I would like to workshop on at some point. – Travis J Jul 8 at 0:47
  • 2
    Everyone standing for election and being prepared to spend a considerable part of his time here has my greatest respect. But I also have to admit that I'm still pessimistic about the future of SO. Maybe some things have improved since the fallout last year, and there have been some developments with close votes or guidance by the UI but somehow my impression is that that only underlines how futile it really is. 3 instead of 5 close votes together with a higher close voting activity means we can now close twice as many questions as before, but it's not nearly enough. Will it ever be? – Trilarion Jul 8 at 7:25
  • 1
    @Trilarion - Well, the answer to that in my opinion is no, it will never be enough. Don't get too caught up on that though, because it is important to keep in mind that this content occupies real estate in an online environment which comes with several advantages. Primarily, if someone reproduces half of lorem ipsum with some gibberish, Google (or your search engine of choice) will never find it. Given a year that post even if left open will only have a dozen views. – Travis J Jul 8 at 17:34
  • 5
    Our focus should remain on encouraging the quality content being produced, and we should acknowledge that those dozen views are not worth our time to address. It is good enough as it stands, and there is progress to made in other places. New user experience for example is probably one of the better places to start. The issue is that we need to balance both sides, the curation and the creation. It is best to prevent a leak than to constantly mop it up or catch it in a bucket. – Travis J Jul 8 at 17:34
  • 4
    New users need tooling to help them so that we can get them better help while at the same time preventing deletion-requiring content from overwhelming our curators. I know this isn't an issue a moderator can solve, but that is what the community does need, and I have said this is various other places as well. Obviously that is something we will just have to voice our collective concerns about over time and hope the team can actually invest locally here in the platform instead of externally by trying to create the next best thing. – Travis J Jul 8 at 17:34
  • 1
    I appreciate the calibre of your nomination, you seem so successful employing 100 employees and I can see being a mod would add to your business similar to MS Regional Directors. Why don't you want to run/build up your business at VP level instead of spending your spare time helping out here for free? You mentioned you're the only IT guy too so I don't see any monetary/business incentive, do you have a cash cow and just want to hang out mod'ing here? – Jeremy Thompson Jul 10 at 12:34
  • 3
    @JeremyThompson - Thanks for the interest from the down under! I work a lot, but that isn't all I want to do. I am also very good at delegating. I don't want to spend all my free time trying to maximize profit, because people need to have balanced lives. Never underestimate the value of joy. Stack Overflow helped me a lot along the way in various aspects, and I enjoy giving back, helping the community, and doing what I can to ensure that it thrives. – Travis J Jul 10 at 18:38
  • please define: "vulgar nastiness". i think it is very subjective what we call vulgar. – tcxbalage Jul 21 at 9:34
120
votes

Dharman

profile for Dharman at Stack Overflow, Q&A for professional and enthusiast programmers

Q1

The general atmosphere amongst the moderators is currently not the sweetest. A lot of them have resigned due to the issues on the site in the past year, and many others have significantly reduced their activity. COVID-19 has put pressure on our real lives, which is dragging the remaining ones down. The flag queue has been increasing, and has been higher than what it used to be in the past couple of years. In these testing times, what would you do to bring back happiness in the community, and motivate them to do more moderation tasks? Do you think you have the mettle to handle these gloomy situations, and help the Stack Overflow community bounce back on the moderation front?

In my opinion, burnouts can be a serious problem. This is why we need more moderators who can help take some load off of existing moderators. I can't help with the COVID-19 situation, but I can help by taking over some of the duties of our hard-working moderators. I understand that we all have real lives and families and we can't expect moderators to spend most of the day handling the queues. I believe my eagerness and willingness to help will improve the morale of remaining moderators. The fact that you have remained and continue to do your duties means you still value the site and you want what's best for it. Let's keep caring for it together.


Q2

With all of the drama that has happened on the site in the last few months, why do you still want to run? What is it that drives you? What motivates you to still want to serve the community in good faith given your efforts will almost always go unnoticed, and that the folks you think have your back may at any point turn against you?

Stack Overflow is the best place to find answers to your programming problems. The biggest reason Stack Overflow is so successful is because the content is community-moderated. We want to freely share the programming knowledge with other developers because we realize the better developers we have the better software we get. I am driven by a love of programming. I really want this site to survive its hard times and keep serving the developer community for years.
Of course, to have good content we need moderators who are expert coders and who also care about this site's contents deeply.


Q3

A high rep user of the site has started to link their own library in many of their answers. Tipped off by a flag, you see that they are overtly self promoting themselves, and handle it by deleting their answers and sending them a mod message asking them to update their answers and provide affiliation. The user is arguably furious after reading your message. They then post their own version of the story on meta without giving much information, and cite that you deleted all their answers. The meta crowd, who is half informed about the situation has brought out all pitchforks, as a high rep user has been contacted. What do you do here to de-escalate the increased tensions? Additionally, do you feel that high rep users must be given more leeway than low rep users, or should the law be the same for all?

Spam is spam. We should always look for the good in people and try to give them the benefit of doubt whenever possible, but we can't tolerate inappropriate content. If the answers were added only to promote a site or product, do not disclose the affiliation, or they do not directly answer the question then they should be removed. If there is a way to salvage useful answers, then adding the affiliation for the user could be the option, but the important thing here is recognizing what the intention of the poster was. If they only want to promote their product/library then it is not acceptable. If they wrote the library to fill in the niche and they meant well, then we can work together to salvage the answers.

If the issue is raised on meta about a flag I handled then I will provide an answer just as if it was any other flag by any user. I will share as many details as allowed to share publicly and try to give my point of view of the situation. I will explain that I acted in the best interest of the community. Multiple exact same answers linking to the same product are not allowed, but if the author is willing to disclose their affiliation and explain how this product solves the original problem then the best answer can be undeleted.


Q4

How aware are you of the controversial events on the network from Q3-4 last year? Assuming you are aware, what makes you still feel you wish to nominate now? Show us you know exactly what you are doing when you are running in this election. In particular, moderators are (should be) representatives of the community and its best interests, not the company. How can you find balance in representing what is the best for community and at the same time avoid conflicting the company to the point where the company may decide to remove your privileges?

I have been following all of it from the start. I do not care much for the drama. I come here for useful programming information.

My goal will be to bring the community's focus back to the content, rather than the company's actions. I will also try to convince the company to provide more tools useful for content moderation rather than social media novelties. We should be welcoming to all users, but we definitely can't welcome all the content.

We need to remember that people who want to become moderators do it not to drill more holes in the sinking ship, but to patch the existing ones.


Q5

Here are two questions but you only need to answer one. It is about how you would interact on Meta.

  • Your candidate score is > 20
    Stack Overflow is moving into a new era with the next generation of developers / engineers / enthusiasts emerging. As you have a high candidate score you have been here long enough to not remember what it was like when you started here as a user (things changed, okay?). Why do you think you are the right person to guide / understand / support the upcoming community that is so much different with different needs and a different attitude? Please elaborate.
  • Your candidate score is <= 20
    Stack Overflow has a history with a vocal community, focused on quality. As you still have opportunities to develop yourself in certain aspects of moderation, you can approach problems with a new and fresh vision. How will you leverage your relative inexperience in engaging with the longstanding users and encouraging the upcoming generation in contributing to the knowledge base SO wants to be? Please elaborate.

I don't think the needs of the community are that much different. We still come here to find answers to common problems.

There is a need to educate new users better and make all the meta-information more easily accessible. I believe that most of the disappointment of the new-comers stems from the wrong expectations. This is not a help portal where you can ask someone to fix your problem. This is the place where you can find answers by looking through existing questions. Only when you can't find an answer, should you assume you have a brand new problem which merits a fresh question. We need to help new users understand this.

For veteran users, we need better moderation tools. We have already entrusted the community with a lot of moderation tasks, but many tools need improvement and we could also use some brand new tools. We must do something to reduce the inflow of new questions, so we can focus on answering and maintaining the existing ones.


Q6

A user has replied to an increasingly heated comment chain and used an ambiguous yet colloquial word that can be gender neutral to many people, but carries an implicit male context by itself ("dude", "guys", etc.). This comment draws a few red flags, including a custom moderator flag that accuses the person of violating the pronoun code of conduct. There's nothing else flag-worthy about the comment. How would you handle this?

First, I will investigate the comment and the context to see if the word was used in an abusive/offensive manner. If I can't find any sign of inappropriate misconduct I will decline the flags. I will then proceed to analyse the whole comment thread to see if any of the comments provide useful on-topic information and I will delete any that are no longer needed. If the users do not stop commenting I will comment-lock the post to let the users know they should back-off.


Q7

There have been several unpopular features lately, changes in moderation policy forced prompted by SE, and a promise by the company (I am not stating this promise has been kept.) to listen to feedback from the community. Given this I have a two-part question (with the second part being the more important part in my view):

  1. What do you think a moderator's role should be when an unpopular feature is rolled out by SE?
  2. What would you, as a moderator, do when faced with a controversial decision announced by the company, one which you personally disagreed with, and felt was bad for the community at large?2

I believe moderators are like the parents who go with their children to a playground. You let children play with each other and watch from aside. You make sure they don't get hurt and if they do, you try to soothe the pain.

  1. If a feature is planned, then the company should ask moderators first if they think it will be well-received by the community. Ideally, the company should do market research and ask for opinions of the community first by asking on Meta. Then the moderators' job would be to watch the discussion and make sure that it is civil and polite. If the feature is really unpopular the company can expect some backlash, which is why it's important they ask for feedback before releasing it.

    The sentiment right now is that the unpopular features are released without asking the community if they want it or not. Stack Overflow's community is composed of developers and designers. We have plenty of valuable input the company can use to improve their product. All they need to do is ask for it and listen.

  2. As a moderator, my role would be to act as a representative of us all. If I think that the decision will not be properly acclaimed by the users then I should voice my concerns to the company and try to convince them to go another way. I reserve the right to be wrong, so if the decision is really controversial then it should be announced on Meta so that a broader audience can speak up and discuss the pros and cons.


Q8

How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

If they are valid flags then I would reach out to the user and let them know that some of their comments are unkind and/or offensive. I would try to make them understand how they are breaking the CoC and what they can do to improve the behaviour, with the help of some examples. The user could be completely oblivious that they are acting improperly, so talking to them politely could solve the issue. If the behaviour does not improve then the only option might be to suspend them for some time.

It makes no difference if the flags are concerning their comments, answers, chat activity or meta posts. We need to be respectful of each other in everything we do.


Q9

Do you see moderators as a cooperating team or as a collection of individuals with the "nuke" button? (Note: "nuke" is used as a general term here, referring to the fact that all actions by a moderator are binding and take effect immediately.)

How would you handle a situation where another moderator closed/deleted/etc. a question that you feel shouldn't have been? Could you be convinced by fellow moderators to revert one of your moderating decisions (delete/close/undelete/reopen/suspend/unsuspend)?

Both. Moderators work together to keep the site clean. They need to help each other and cooperate. However, all mods have nuking powers, because it is expected that in most situations they should be able to handle the situation on their own and make the appropriate decision.

If I find something I disagree with I will talk to the other mod and try to understand their point of view. Just because I have strong opinions about something does not mean I am right. If we can work out the correct solution to the problem then it's great. If after discussing it we still disagree then I think it is best to let it go. If it's something serious we can ask together on Meta to see what other experts think, but I think that would be a rather rare outcome.

Most importantly I would not act against another mod without letting them know why. I think it is rude to override someone's decision without asking them for more details first.


Q10

Given the trials and tribulations that Stack Overflow is facing—not just with some high profile departures from Stack Overflow moderation—what makes you believe that you'll be motivated and capable of handling the many responsibilities of moderation?

I hope that no more moderators are going to leave anytime soon. We need more moderators. The company has promised to listen more closely to our feedback. Of course, the community lost trust in the company and rebuilding it will take some time, but I think it's in the interest of both parties that the relations improve and we work together.

I am motivated to keep the site clean even without moderator privileges because I love coding and I want people to get better at it. I really think Stack Overflow is a great resource and as long as it exists and my personal situation permits I want to take care of this repository of information.


Return to the question

  • 11
    I like how pragmatic your answers are. At the end of the day, I believe moderators have an important role in bridging the gap between the company and the community, not regardless, but especially because of what happened in the past months, and, in my view, you succeed in transmitting this kind of confidence. Good luck – blackgreen Jul 7 at 18:08
  • 38
    "My goal will be to bring the community's focus back to the content, rather than the company's actions" IMO in a lot of cases the company's actions have often directly contributed to the amount of poor quality content (firing a good moderator for a bad reason, and causing the resignation of many. the welcoming. retroactively increasing question rep without thinking it through). If you care about the content, you must hold the company accountable for their decisions which influence it. – Michael Jul 7 at 18:45
  • 2
    What would you do to encourage downvoting? And would you continue to use downvotes were you to be given a binding and unlimited "Delete" button? – Adrian Mole Jul 7 at 20:18
  • 1
    @AdrianMole Yes, I think I would use it even more. I think we can encourage downvoting by showing the benefits of it and explaining what it means. However, I strongly agree with the top answer in my question. – Dharman Jul 7 at 21:13
  • 6
    I don't think you answered #10. You waxed optimistic on that you're hoping that these things don't happen...but that's not the question I'm asking. Suppose they did. Suppose that your feedback was not just ignored, but run over and then mounted on the wall in an embarrassing way. Suppose that every moderator decided to quit leaving you holding the bag. Suppose that the people who used Stack Overflow were leveraging it as a way to get unpaid labor during their business hours (and this isn't as far-fetched as you might think). Would you still want to be a mod? Why? – Makoto Jul 7 at 23:11
  • 12
    @Makoto You are being a little bit of downer right now. My answers to these questions were meant to inspire others to also nominate themselves. I know that the worst can happen, but I am staying optimistic that it won't come to the worst. If the site becomes unstable and unfit for purpose then another site will come along and I will want to moderate content there. As long as Stack Overflow exists and I can curate the information posted here, I want to help out. I am not here to start fires, I am here to put them out. – Dharman Jul 7 at 23:17
  • 4
    I'm asking a straight-up question because this is something you're going to face. It's important to be optimistic, sure, but it's also important to really weigh what you're getting yourself into. If you're just going in with only optimism, I fear you're going into a den of lions who know no table manners. Besides, I view it as my role in this parlay to really get to know who wants to be a diamond moderator. It's a big responsibility and I need to be sure that, with the short amount of time we have to get to know one another, that you're actually up for it. – Makoto Jul 7 at 23:44
  • 7
    @Makoto I am aware of the problems I could face as a moderator. I completely realize that my efforts could go completely unappreciated and the company has all the power. I understand that there are some animosities at the moment, and it is probably the only thing that scares me a little, but I am willing to give my best nonetheless. I am not a one to complain all the time and when the going gets tough I don't quit. I try to improve the situation and make the best of what is available. – Dharman Jul 7 at 23:51
  • 13
    I have been a huge fan of your work in SOCVR, and I’ve been thinking for the past several weeks that you’d make a great moderator. In general, I have no objection to your stance of deleting more content. I ran on a similar platform, and I continue to practice it daily. I’m all for deleting low-quality content. However, years back, we had some in-fighting between two sects: those who wanted to preserve old content that is now regarded as off-topic, and those who thought it should be deleted with prejudice. The historical lock was introduced as a compromise. Which side do you fall on, and why? – Cody Gray Jul 8 at 0:10
  • 6
    @Cody I will not be deleting historically locked posts unless they contain really harmful information. I will definitely be applying historical lock myself, but only to carefully chosen posts that people have found useful in the past and keeping such posts online will not harm our community in any way. I will not be deleting content that has got any value unless really necessary. However, I am a strong believer that we do not need to keep everything alive. There is plenty of old off-topic low-quality posts that need to be removed and deleting them will make Stack Overflow a better place. – Dharman Jul 9 at 13:28
  • Very possible that I'm missing something with how flags are handled, but is #6 really the right order of operations? Seems like looking at the context before declining flags would help you understand why the flags were raised – camille Jul 14 at 15:05
  • @camille It's what I said "First, I will investigate the comment and the context to see if the word was used in an abusive/offensive manner." Context matters in a comment discussion – Dharman Jul 14 at 15:06
  • Okay, I think I was misunderstanding what you meant by "I will then proceed to analyse the whole comment thread to see if any of the comments provide useful on-topic information." I guess you mean useful on-topic information as it applies to the post, not the reasons why comments were being flagged? – camille Jul 14 at 15:15
  • @camille Exactly. Because comments might be completely unneeded even if the reason for flagging does not apply. A lot of comments can be safely removed without losing any valuable information. – Dharman Jul 14 at 15:17
12
votes

Tschallacka

profile for Tschallacka at Stack Overflow, Q&A for professional and enthusiast programmers

  1. The general atmosphere amongst the moderators is currently not the sweetest. A lot of them have resigned due to the issues on the site in the past year, and many others have significantly reduced their activity. COVID-19 has put pressure on our real lives, which is dragging the remaining ones down. The flag queue has been increasing, and has been higher than what it used to be in the past couple of years. In these testing times, what would you do to bring back happiness in the community, and motivate them to do more moderation tasks? Do you think you have the mettle to handle these gloomy situations, and help the Stack Overflow community bounce back on the moderation front?

First of all let me say, that the boundary of expectations is put very high in this question.
Unachievable by one person high. It’s like Aragorn running forwards to the gates alone to battle the army pouring out. Unless a couple of hobbits will throw a ring into a volcano, victory cannot be achieved.

The last few years on Stack Overflow have been turbulent, to say the least, which makes the role of moderator, not exactly the shiny high price it used to be. Putting unrealistic expectations on people who are willing to take the step nonetheless isn’t productive. I’ll settle for realistic goals, on a more achievable level, I wish to make a difference on the site, perhaps bring a bit of comradery to the moderation sub-community, serve as a tie-breaker in conflicts and put in my best effort, spend half an hour, an hour a day working through the moderation queue’s, helping to break down the backlog.
I can’t promise I’ll be stellar, but maybe I’ll be average. Maybe that’s good enough. I’ll do my best to motivate others to keep going, to keep that towel out of the ring, but if it impairs their mental well-being, I will be the first to say, “maybe it’s time to call it quits for a few months. Take a holiday from moderation and consider if you wish to continue, and in which way you wish to continue”. It’s my opinion that some help breaking down the queues is better than no help. 25% effort is better than 0%. It’s not worth sacrificing mental well-being over.

  1. With all of the drama that has happened on the site in the last few months, why do you still want to run? What is it that drives you? What motivates you to still want to serve the community in good faith given your efforts will almost always go unnoticed, and that the folks you think have your back may at any point turn against you?

Well, if I needed a question that summarizes how I’ve experienced Stack overflow the last few years, this is it.
What motivates me? I’ve been a member since 2012. Sometimes answering the nice questions, sometimes the junk questions when I got point fever where I wanted to reach a goal. Mostly I try to answer the interesting questions or give a complete teaching answer to the questions that seem simple on the surface, with various returns on investments. Some answers take me 5 hours to type out, correct, revision, expand, etc... just to make it as accessible as possible.
What motivates me to do that? I wish to help people become better programmers.

What motivates me to wish to become a moderator? I wish to keep this site free of spam, no effort questions, conflict, and really, keep this site as the resource as it is.
Easily google-able, making coding accessible for the next generation of programmers(although that is a double-edged sword, as I just have a trainee who knows how to copy-paste well…. But that’s another discussion).
In the end, it’s a selfish choice to become a moderator, as I desperately do not wish to return to the days from before Stack Overflow.
For those who do not know, this was the everyday reality before Stack Overflow came along:

wisdom of the ancients
Author: XKCD License :CC BY-NC 2.5

If Stack Overflow were to go down to too much spam, low-quality content, not getting enough ad revenue to justify keeping the servers up, etc… the internet would turn into a dark place for programmers, for me at least. For almost every issue I encounter I find a useful collection of answers on Stack Overflow. I wish to keep that alive for as long as possible.

  1. A high rep user of the site has started to link their own library in many of their answers. Tipped off by a flag, you see that they are overtly self promoting themselves, and handle it by deleting their answers and sending them a mod message asking them to update their answers and provide affiliation. The user is arguably furious after reading your message. They then post their own version of the story on meta without giving much information, and cite that you deleted all their answers. The meta crowd, who is half informed about the situation has brought out all pitchforks, as a high rep user has been contacted. What do you do here to de-escalate the increased tensions? Additionally, do you feel that high rep users must be given more leeway than low rep users, or should the law be the same for all?

Yes, uh, we start with the assumption that I would just blanket delete the questions. I would first try to approach the user in question and give them 1-2 days to remedy the situation before I would step in with a delete hammer. Unless the user has had previous warnings of the sort (can I see that as a moderator? No clue).
If someone has made a useful library of course that person is going to encounter a lot of questions that that library applies to in some form or another, but maybe that person doesn’t know about the disclosure rules or forgot, and it was an honest mistake.
I prefer in such a case that the person can correct himself before I do this public display of deleting the posts and then undeleting them etc… That costs a lot of energy, strive, frustration just because someone wishes to help. When possible I’ll try to mitigate that on beforehand.
But let’s assume I’ve not given it much thought because I was jaded at some point and just deleted the answers promoting the library, the meta scenario ensues and I arrive with my pizza’s to the room on fire.

I think I would make an answer to that question with an answer something along the lines of:

I understand you’re upset userXYZ that your answers have been deleted, It’s never fun to have your hard work removed from public view so abruptly and thoroughly. You’ve probably worked hard on the library you were promoting and just trying to help others with it.
I apologize for the inconvenience and perhaps the message I’ve sent you explaining my actions got lost between other interactions on the website and you missed it. In it, I explained that the promotion of your library is perfectly fine, but you need to edit in your answer a full disclosure that you are the author of this library as explained by Brad Larson How to offer personal open-source libraries?. Just mentioning it in your profile isn’t enough as many people won’t click through.
If you edit in the disclosures in your answers, I’ll be happy to undelete them as soon as possible. Again, my apologies for the frustration caused, and I hope this clarifies why your questions were deleted.

After posting that answer I’ll leave it alone, and it will boil itself dry if there are people who still wish to rail against my decisions. They will find a new target to rail against soon enough. I did my job to the best of my abilities, I can’t do more.

  1. How aware are you of the controversial events on the network from Q3-4 last year? Assuming you are aware, what makes you still feel you wish to nominate now? Show us you know exactly what you are doing when you are running in this election. In particular, moderators are (should be) representatives of the community and its best interests, not the company. How can you find balance in representing what is the best for community and at the same time avoid conflicting the company to the point where the company may decide to remove your privileges?

The only reason I’m here is to keep Stack Overflow afloat so I have an easy repository of answers. If the company wishes to take my privileges away because of my opinions, let them. It’s a US company, and from what I’ve seen from the internet, US companies are, to put it in nice terms, not nice. All that counts at the end is the bottom line. I don’t care, all I want is for them to keep hosting this repository of knowledge, and keeping it as clean as possible to increase the chances that they will keep hosting it.
The last 2-3 years have been an eventful time on Stack Overflow where I’ve even briefly considered stop using it a few times. It has hurt me to see this community in pain through the actions of the company multiple times, to see the community ignored, trampled on, and then ignored again. Until too much of the community revolted and moderators started dropping like flies. Then the company took notice (as their SEO rating probably tanked due to an increase in spam, duplicate content, making the site less valuable to Google, thus decreasing ad revenue, that’s just my pet conspiracy theory though, ignore it). It was an emotional time. I’m not massively active on meta, only voicing my opinions on pieces where I think it has added value, but mostly looking from the sidelines and observing, and hoping the community will survive.
For the community, I’ll go the extra mile and try to be there for them. Help them when possible by removing junk, handling flags, and stepping in when needed. I will not shut my mouth when I don’t want to, and if the company disagrees they can remove my moderator privileges and find a new person to dig through the pile of flags. I’ll happily keep on answering questions and participating on the site as a normal user.
I expect them to remove my privileges. Every day I can help the community as a moderator by keeping the site clean is a win. I have 0 trust in Stack Overflow the company. I have a lot of faith in the community, even with all the bickering back and forth on Meta on various subjects.

  1. Stack Overflow is moving into a new era with the next generation of developers / engineers / enthusiasts emerging. As you have a high candidate score you have been here long enough to not remember what it was like when you started here as a user (things changed, okay?). Why do you think you are the right person to guide / understand / support the upcoming community that is so much different with different needs and a different attitude? Please elaborate.

Did the needs really change? Perhaps they have. I have a trainee currently who isn’t a champ at coding original code but can do wizardly things with copy-pasted answers from Stack Overflow that suit his problem. Is that a typical member of the new community that I’m expected to nurture? Perhaps it is.
Or perhaps it is guiding them into not posting the same duplicate questions that have various good answers that together come to a workable solution. But you can’t copy-paste it, you need to work for it, lay the links to a solution yourself.
I think my work ethos of the olden days on Stack Overflow still applies: Be kind, be helpful, be firm.
Help new users by posting a comment, explaining problems helps sometimes more than just plain deleting a post. I wish for people to become thriving members of the Stack Overflow ecosystem, and help them on the way to that path, how hard that may be as all the easy questions already have 20.000 duplicate questions.
Just blanket closing a question may not be productive for a new user with 1 rep who has a genuine problem but never knew how to google for the right answer, but allowing that question to live isn’t acceptable either. But closing as duplicate may also scare them. I would have to see situation by situation basis how to lessen the “blow” for new users, who still need to learn the ropes, that we are not a forum, that we like to keep things neutral and professional like a workplace. Sometimes a comment may be in place, sometimes a mod message, depending on the situation. But I would try my best to explain and to guide them on how to improve their question and to find their way on the site.
I’ve spent my time hanging around several questions, just to catch the original poster so I could explain what went wrong, why alternatives were better, and how to look for it in the future to prevent the same outcome. Most of the time it was appreciated that I invested the time.
I doubt that I need to change that approach. Personal and kind. But when needed the scythe comes.

  1. A user has replied to an increasingly heated comment chain and used an ambiguous yet colloquial word that can be gender neutral to many people, but carries an implicit male context by itself ("dude", "guys", etc.). This comment draws a few red flags, including a custom moderator flag that accuses the person of violating the pronoun code of conduct. There's nothing else flag-worthy about the comment. How would you handle this?

I would look at the context of the discussion. If it drew multiple flags it means multiple people were triggered by this, which says something about the way the message is largely interpreted which makes people trip over this and raise a flag.
Then I will see what action is needed. Maybe a mod message to the offender to please refrain from using those terms as per code of conduct as multiple people took offense to that use, and to please keep language to workplace appropriate levels. You wouldn’t normally call your colleagues dude either, unless you have a cool job, then totally do that. and delete the relevant comment chain, as the comments are intended to improve/clarify the question/answer and not a permanent fixture for all prosperity.
Depending on what was discussed I might send a ping to the author to include relevant details in their answer/question if that hasn’t been done yet before I delete the comments. The world has come a long way in the last 120 years, abolishing slavery, capital punishment, child labor, gay rights, social healthcare, workers’ rights, etc…(not all the world though sadly) I just see this as a part of a trend where the world tries to become a little bit more peaceful and nicer to live in. Let’s just go with the flow and make the people happy for whom this is important. It doesn’t affect me, but it means a big deal to them.

  1. There have been several unpopular features lately, changes in moderation policy forced prompted by SE, and a promise by the company (I am not stating this promise has been kept.) to listen to feedback from the community. Given this I have a two-part question (with the second part being the more important part in my view):
    1. What do you think a moderator's role should be when an unpopular feature is rolled out by SE?

Voice my opinion as a member of the community. I am not paid by the company. The worst they can do is remove my moderator privileges and my account. Big deal, their loss.

  1. What would you, as a moderator, do when faced with a controversial decision announced by the company, one which you personally disagreed with, and felt was bad for the community at large?

Depending on my role and the proposed rule: A) Begrudgingly apply it, B) Resign
I will not make a fuss probably. I’ll just shake the dust off my feet and become a normal member again if it’s a big thing I’m totally against. I will not enforce things I don’t feel comfortable with. Unless I’m paid a nice sum of money of course. Everybody has his price, but I doubt Stack Overflow will do that.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Probably with a mod message explaining the consequences of the person's behavior and the amount of work it causes.

Hello posterXYZ, I value your contributions to the site highly, they are very detailed and popular. However, in the comments on some of your answers, a lot of people take offense to the way you have phrased your comments. On answer XXXX you posted for example “blue is the new orange”, and this resulted in 7 people flagging your comment for XYZ. The same for comments a, b, c.
A lot of your comment chains tend to devolve in a heated argument which doesn’t always end nicely. Please note that comments are intended to clarify/improve a question and answer, to be constructive to improve the content, not for debating subjects. We have chat rooms for that when needed.
Please try to refrain from debating and arguing in the comments, as it causes a lot of work for us moderators to review, and it doesn’t contribute to your answers in any way. Please try to take a constructive approach in the future and find an avenue to improve your answer and if that is not possible walk away from the argument, and flag the comment you find useless as not needed anymore.

  1. Do you see moderators as a cooperating team or as a collection of individuals with the "nuke" button? (Note: "nuke" is used as a general term here, referring to the fact that all actions by a moderator are binding and take effect immediately.)

How does a team with nuke buttons sound? We work together, but separately. We stay in contact but also respect each other's opinions on certain matters/decisions. You do it together, as a team, but the work on the ground is performed by the individuals but with always the team in the back of the mind.

How would you handle a situation where another moderator closed/deleted/etc. a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

Not all moderators have the same knowledge. One may be more fluent in Java, another in C# another in COBOL. There are times where it is hard to ascertain the contents of a post and the finesses if it doesn’t fit within your comfort zone.
Sometimes you just take the best guess from a mod panel, and you worked away a load of flags. Mistakes can and will happen in such a situation. In such a case where I would encounter another mod's closing/suspending etc… where I feel it was unjustified I would try to talk to the mod about the motivation, reasoning, and see if we can find a common opinion. It can be that the other mod convinces me, or I convince the other mod, or we agree to disagree. In only one case the question gets reopened. I will default to the initial judgment of the other mod.

Could you be convinced by fellow moderators to revert one of your moderating decisions (delete/close/undelete/reopen/suspend/unsuspend)?

Yes, with convincing arguments. As I explained above, making mistakes is human. Correcting them should be part of the process. The convincing argument to me can be:
Tschallacka, you were a bleeping moron. If you had opened the question you would have seen the glaring issue at hand.

  1. Given the trials and tribulations that Stack Overflow is facing—not just with some high profile departures from Stack Overflow moderation—what makes you believe that you'll be motivated and capable of handling the many responsibilities of moderation?

I’m just a moderator for fun. I don’t take it too seriously nor will I invest too much of my energy in it that I’ll be deeply affected by things that rock the boat, the events of the last year have scarred me, and I'm not willing to let Stack Overflow come "too" close yet. I do deeply care for the community. It's complicated to explain how I feel. When needed I’ll just step back and let someone else fill in the place. In the end, the chances are likely that Stack Overflow will be gone and replaced by something else in 40 years. I will not waste years of my life worrying about things that will probably vanish within my lifetime. I have too much life to enjoy.
I think this slight edge of not caring that much if I'll keep the moderator job, is what will help me keep my sanity if events like in the last year would occur again(I, really, really hope not)


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  • 81
    I feel like these shouldn't be edited by the community to fix typos etc.; I'd like to see how a candidate writes without "help". – Benjamin W. Jul 7 at 14:39
  • 57
    I don't believe your laissez-faire demeanor towards moderation is what I'm looking for in a moderator right now. Your answers to #7 and #10 especially don't sit as well with me because it indicates less of an interest in advocating for the community in addition to the janitorial work. I get the distinct impression you're looking for the power alone. – Makoto Jul 7 at 14:40
  • 12
    @Makoto You word Cody Gray's opinion as well. It is also why I debated with myself and in the election chat if I should offer myself as a candidate. My laissez-faire demeanor largely stems from the actions Stack Overflow has performed the last year(s) and how I internally hurt because I feared for the community. I had to distance myself from Stack Overflow and nearly considered quitting at one point. Then the company promised better and I decided to hold out, but honestly, I'm scared to tie myself too closely, in fear of being hurt again. I cared too deeply about SO, and needed to distance. – Tschallacka Jul 7 at 15:51
  • 7
    @Makato 2/2 But in the end it was suggested that overall I would make a good candidate, and that it was at least worth the shot to nominate myself. I care for SO, and I want it to remain and grow and be healthy. But I do try to keep a healthy distance, as not to have sleepness nights again about where Stack Overflow is going, losing the shining jewel that it was/is. – Tschallacka Jul 7 at 15:54
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    @Michael True, I should word there that it causes offense. I will modify that. Thank you. – Tschallacka Jul 7 at 15:55
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    Your answer to number 3: don't approach people like that. You wrote multiple completely useless sentences. That kind of text is the number 1 thing I hate about support centres, etc. It only serves to waste the time of the reader, and make them dismiss what comes after, as also being some stupid canned "nice" text. It's nothing but pollution. Just get to the point. – Andreas Jul 7 at 22:41
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    I hate false kindness as much or more than anyone, so I know what you mean. However, there’s nothing wrong with Tschallacka’s proposed wording. While you may not need or appreciate the lead-in and empathy, @Andreas, most users do, and empirical evidence suggests that this approach works much better to enact change. Furthermore, mods have templates for most of these things. The most important thing for an individual mod is to add more details about the specific situation. I think Tschallaka would be able to do that. See also: meta.stackexchange.com/a/336550 – Cody Gray Jul 8 at 0:06
  • 3
    @Andreas basically what Cody Gray said I couldn't say better. Also the reasoning behind it is to be welcoming, I applied this even before this became a thing on Stack Overflow because of the negative sentiment outside of Stack Overflow concerning Stack Overflow. By leading with understanding their side, and viewpoints, you make a large portion of reciepients of a correcting message more open to recieve it. It works with kids, and I've found that it works with adults just as well. While some people like to cut to the chase like you, most people actually need this, otherwise they feel attacked. – Tschallacka Jul 8 at 7:16
  • 3
    Re #3: assuming the user read the messages (which a high-rep user is likely to have done) and simply disagreed, "perhaps the message I’ve sent .. got lost" comes across as quite dismissive and egotistical (i.e. "surely my excellent explanation would've been good enough for anyone, so the most likely possibility here is that you simply missed it") and seems likely to just escalate the situation further. I would probably say "[Similar to/To expand on] what I said in the message...". – NotThatGuy Jul 12 at 4:15
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    @BenjaminW. Just go to the edit history page and fetch the first revision of this post. – Bernardo Duarte Jul 12 at 13:01
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    All other "top" candidates sound too too political. And politicians usually say what people want to hear, and/or what often they wish was how they were, but which in practice they can't fulfill for a number of reasons. You are a real person. Realistic. Honest. The world is not perfect, SO is not perfect, and you are not perfect, but you'll do your best. You got my vote. – msb Jul 17 at 0:40
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votes

The general atmosphere amongst the moderators is currently not the sweetest. A lot of them have resigned due to the issues on the site in the past year, and many others have significantly reduced their activity. COVID-19 has put pressure on our real lives, which is dragging the remaining ones down. The flag queue has been increasing, and has been higher than what it used to be in the past couple of years. In these testing times, what would you do to bring back happiness in the community, and motivate them to do more moderation tasks? Do you think you have the mettle to handle these gloomy situations, and help the Stack Overflow community bounce back on the moderation front?

  1. It is ultimately up to us, the community, to decide if we want to support Stack Overflow staff in moderation.

With all of the drama that has happened on the site in the last few months, why do you still want to run? What is it that drives you? What motivates you to still want to serve the community in good faith given your efforts will almost always go unnoticed, and that the folks you think have your back may at any point turn against you?

  1. I want to I help heal misunderstandings between Stack Overflow staff and the stack Overflow community.

A high rep user of the site has started to link their own library in many of their answers. Tipped off by a flag, you see that they are overtly self promoting themselves, and handle it by deleting their answers and sending them a mod message asking them to update their answers and provide affiliation. The user is arguably furious after reading your message. They then post their own version of the story on meta without giving much information, and cite that you deleted all their answers. The meta crowd, who is half informed about the situation has brought out all pitchforks, as a high rep user has been contacted. What do you do here to de-escalate the increased tensions? Additionally, do you feel that high rep users must be given more leeway than low rep users, or should the law be the same for all?

  1. First, I will lay out the facts, positive and negative in a meta post. Second, I will listen to the community. Third, I will post my (possibly changed) opinion.

How aware are you of the controversial events on the network from Q3-4 last year? Assuming you are aware, what makes you still feel you wish to nominate now? Show us you know exactly what you are doing when you are running in this election. In particular, moderators are (should be) representatives of the community and its best interests, not the company. How can you find balance in representing what is the best for community and at the same time avoid conflicting the company to the point where the company may decide to remove your privileges?

  1. Stack Overflow is nothing without contributors.

Stack Overflow has a history with a vocal community, focused on quality. As you still have opportunities to develop yourself in certain aspects of moderation, you can approach problems with a new and fresh vision. How will you leverage your relative inexperience in engaging with the longstanding users and encouraging the upcoming generation in contributing to the knowledge base SO wants to be? Please elaborate.

  1. I will directly talk to developers' I know on other channels experiences on contributing to Stack Overflow. I will condense community feedback and send it to Stack Overflow's CEO and Board of Directors. It is important for Stack Overflow staff to understand the community at all levels. If they do not read their email, I will mail Stack Overflow Inc's physical address.

A user has replied to an increasingly heated comment chain and used an ambiguous yet colloquial word that can be gender neutral to many people, but carries an implicit male context by itself ("dude", "guys", etc.). This comment draws a few red flags, including a custom moderator flag that accuses the person of violating the pronoun code of conduct. There's nothing else flag-worthy about the comment. How would you handle this?

  1. Remove the comment and send the user an edited version of the comment and ask them to re-post the edited version. If the comment itself is not nice, I will send them an edited version to focus on the critical issue the comment addresses. People tend to feel indignant when other people put words in their mouths. Sending someone a nicer version of their comment, makes them see that they were rude, because modmail results in a notification. If they choose to repost their comment, they will have consciously chosen, in a small way, to be nice.

There have been several unpopular features lately, changes in moderation policy forced prompted by SE, and a promise by the company (I am not stating this promise has been kept.) to listen to feedback from the community. Given this I have a two-part question (with the second part being the more important part in my view):

  1. What do you think a moderator's role should be when an unpopular feature is rolled out by SE?
  2. What would you, as a moderator, do when faced with a controversial decision announced by the company, one which you personally disagreed with, and felt was bad for the community at large?
  1. There is no point in the community discussing if the people responsible for Stack Overflow's features are not listening.

How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

  1. I will engage in a discussion to find what: I observe, the user observes, I feel, the user feels, the site feels, the site needs, the user needs, the site wants, the user wants.

Do you see moderators as a cooperating team or as a collection of individuals with the "nuke" button? (Note: "nuke" is used as a general term here, referring to the fact that all actions by a moderator are binding and take effect immediately.)

  1. Moderators are both cooperating group as well as a collection of individuals. A moderator objecting to closure or deletion should result in reversal. In the event of a legitimate dispute between moderators, using the "nuke" feature is wrong.
  • 14
    Any particular reason why you're not choosing to answer #10? – Makoto Jul 13 at 23:49
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    For anyone wondering, I've moved the comments from the other answer here by undeleting and deleting the other answer as a comment. It's hack-y but I hope it addresses people's concerns. I can't do much about the votes but, either way, there's votes on both at this point. – Catija Jul 14 at 1:24
  • 6
    Well, I like at least three of them. It seems to have served its purpose well in being an OK impromptu litmus test on who is really out here wanting to be a moderator for what I'd consider to be the right reasons. If you don't wanna answer it, that's fine. I guess you don't really have to... – Makoto Jul 14 at 3:36
  • 28
    ...by the way, a moderator candidate really should know better than to post answers to the questionnaire on a third party site. It's basically flaunting the rule of link-only answers, and it really looks poor for someone who is going to go for a lot more privilege when it comes to the site. Not a fan of anyone who wants to pull that kind of stunt. – Makoto Jul 14 at 3:39
  • 7
    Re question 6: " Sending someone a nicer version of their comment, makes them see that they were rude," - no. Some people are going to laugh and shrug it off, and call you sensitive because they don't see a problem. Others will lash out, and some will just repost the original and complain how a mod deleted their perfectly fine comment. My point is, people aren't linear - how do you plan on dealing with those cases? – Zoe Jul 14 at 9:58
  • 8
    Re question 7.2: "I will engage in a discussion to find what: I observe, the user observes, I feel, the user feels, the site feels, the site needs, the user needs, the site wants, the user wants." - we have actual rules. Needs, feelings, and desires don't mean much unless it has been properly established on meta first. Some aspect of the rules have a minor democratic aspect to it - and steamrolling existing rules without any discussion first is a great way to get called out on meta – Zoe Jul 14 at 10:00
  • 6
    Finally, re questions 1 and 7.1: you don't actually answer the question, You dodge the question, which is not good considering you're running for mod. "It is ultimately up to us, the community, to decide if we want to support Stack Overflow staff in moderation." - yes, but it doesn't answer " In these testing times, what would you do to bring back happiness in the community, and motivate them to do more moderation tasks?" or " Do you think you have the mettle to handle these gloomy situations, and help the Stack Overflow community bounce back on the moderation front?" – Zoe Jul 14 at 10:15
  • 15
    @LuisFernandoFrontanilla: This was their chance to impress me. That's the whole point of this. – Makoto Jul 14 at 14:49
  • 17
    This doesn't seem like an earnest attempt to show users why you should be a moderator. Do you truly want to be one? – camille Jul 14 at 14:51
  • 13
    I think with that remark that I'm thoroughly satisfied with your response to this nomination. You've showcased your abilities to be a moderator, as well as your aptitude to do such. I don't think you have to defend yourself any further on this. – Makoto Jul 14 at 16:22
  • 18
    "The whole "link-only answers rule" is a greedy attempt to steal link juice by Stack Overflow" - if a link dies, you might be sitting there with a potential answer 5 years after it was posted that you can't use because OP only posted a link. The link-only answer has nothing to do with keeping traffic on SO - it's about making sure the answers remain useful. Even the most seemingly stable links die - Apple reconstructed their documentation and caused a whole bunch of dead links on Stack Overflow. Google's link shortener was shut down. – Zoe Jul 14 at 17:59
  • 5
    Look at it from the perspective of someone looking for an answer in the future - would you rather have plain text, or a link that could've been restructured, removed, or even been redirected to spam and/or malware resulting in no answer? – Zoe Jul 14 at 18:00
  • 7
    You've talked a lot about users needing to get answers - including in chat - but you miss the absolute pain an answer that has been broken by a link causes. Ever been stuck on a problem for hours without finding anything relevant, and then finding the question, and a promising answer, except the link is dead so it's useless? Some links can be salvaged, sure, but nowhere near all links do. Some websites are also built up in a way that requires a snapshot of several sites to properly cover the entire answer, and no where near enough people go through that effort. – Zoe Jul 14 at 18:05
  • 20
    @flakerimi What exactly do you think that this candidate is going to do to prevent Stack Overflow from dying? How do you think that electing them as a moderator is going to help, over what they could do without moderator privileges? – Cody Gray Jul 14 at 23:02
  • 18
    Given that you've received multiple iterations of feedback in chat before posting your questionnaire, I am unable to take your answers at face value, sorry. Your current responses are a stark contrast from your initial nomination and questionnaire responses, and now seem more tuned towards appeasing voters than anything else. – cs95 Jul 16 at 5:08

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