50
votes

The purpose of this thread was to collect questions for the questionnaire. The questionnaire is now live, and you may find it here.

Stack Overflow is scheduled for an election starting next week, 6 July 2020. In connection with that, we will be holding a Q&A with the candidates. This will be an opportunity for members of the community to pose questions to the candidates on the topic of moderation. Participation is completely voluntary.

Here's how it'll work:

  • Until the nomination phase, (so, until 13 July at 20:00:00Z, or 4:00 pm EDT on the same day, give or take time to arrive for closure), this question will be open to collect potential questions from the users of the site. Post answers to this question containing any questions you would like to ask the candidates. Please only post one question per answer.

  • We, the Community Team, will be providing a small selection of generic questions. The first two will be guaranteed to be included, the latter ones are if the community doesn't supply enough questions. This will be done in a single post, unlike the prior instruction.

  • If your question contains a link, please use the syntax of [text](link), as that will make it easier for transcribing for the finished questionnaire.

  • This is a perfect opportunity to voice questions that are specific to your community and issues that you are running into currently.

  • At the start of the nomination phase, the Community Team will select up to 8 of the top voted questions submitted by the community provided in this thread, to use in addition to the aforementioned 2 guaranteed questions. We reserve some editorial control in the selection of the questions and may opt not to select a question that is tangential or irrelevant to moderation or the election. That said, if I have concerns about any questions in this fashion, I will be sure to point this out in comments before the decision making time.

  • Once questions have been selected, a new question will be opened to host the actual questionnaire for the candidates, typically containing 10 questions in total.

  • This is not the only option that users have for gathering information on candidates. As a community, you are still free to, for example, hold a live chat session with your candidates to ask further questions or ping them in the election chatroom, or perhaps clarifications from what is provided in the Q&A.

If you have any questions or feedback about this process, feel free to post as a comment here.

  • Thank you to everyone for your thoughts, suggestions, and comments! The 2020 Moderator Election Question Collection has now concluded. You can find the official questionnaire here, along with the candidates' answers. Don't forget to vote! – Cody Gray Jul 7 at 3:16

24 Answers 24

139
votes

The general atmosphere amongst the moderators is currently not the sweetest. A lot of them have resigned due to the issues on the site in the past year, and many others have significantly reduced their activity. COVID-19 has put pressure on our real lives, which is dragging the remaining ones down. The flag queue has been increasing, and has been higher than what it used to be in the past couple of years. In these testing times, what would you do to bring back happiness in the community, and motivate them to do more moderation tasks? Do you think you have the mettle to handle these gloomy situations, and help the Stack Overflow community bounce back on the moderation front?

  • " flag queue has been increasing"... problem? If so, have there been discussions here on meta that you can point to? – toolic Jun 29 at 20:44
  • 3
    @toolic Was kinda hard to miss, feels like only 4-5 of the mods are actively working on it – Nick Jun 29 at 20:45
  • 1
    @toolic, there aren't any discussions about this specific problem on meta, no. There are discussions which are highly related to the problem, though. If a question on the lines of "why are my flags taking too long to handle" were to be asked, it'd be closed as a duplicate of older posts. The flag queue increasing is certainly a problem, as there would certainly be some time-sensitive custom flags, which aren't being handled on time. – Bhargav Rao Jun 29 at 21:00
  • 1
    @BhargavRao How many of these pending flags are due to the shortage of CMs not moderators? – Dharman Jun 29 at 21:02
  • 2
    @Dharman, none of them, actually. If a flag requires CM intervention, we just escalate it and mark it helpful. – Bhargav Rao Jun 29 at 21:03
  • 1
    "The flag queue has been increasing, and has been higher than what it used to be in the past couple of years." Can it maybe be quantified how many of the flags are not handled currently? Or are all handled but just with a longer delay? – Trilarion Jun 30 at 12:41
  • @Trilarion there are currently more than 600 pending custom flags in the queue. – Bhargav Rao Jun 30 at 15:06
  • Thanks. And how much of a daily workload is that backlog, that is how many flags are handled by all moderators on average per day? – Trilarion Jun 30 at 19:56
  • @Trilarion We can't see how many custom flags are being handled per day. From experience, I can say that a lot of those custom flags might take a few hours per flag. – Bhargav Rao Jul 1 at 0:59
  • Ok, then maybe the median age of the backlog of custom flags? If there is a list sorted by creation date, could you look up the creation date of the 300th waiting custom flag? Just to get an impression of how much work there is. If a lot of these custom flags take a few hours handling per flag, I would say that two new moderators are definitely not enough. – Trilarion Jul 1 at 7:13
  • 1
    @Trilarion June 19th – Bhargav Rao Jul 1 at 17:19
  • 7
    Do you genuinely believe that a moderator's job is (in part) is to "bring back happiness to the community and motivate them to do more moderation tasks?" – Robert Harvey Jul 1 at 17:53
  • 3
    A moderator can certainly do that, @RobertHarvey. For example, when we started working on tag cleanups, there were a handful of interested users. At the end of it, a lot of new users did join in to help weed out bad tags. – Bhargav Rao Jul 1 at 19:35
  • 4
    @BhargavRao So tag clean-up equals happiness? Personally I always regarded it as boring busy-work, but each to their own I guess :) – Lundin Jul 2 at 8:38
  • 13
    @Lundin No, but when you are in a happy place you can be more motivated to participate in cleanups of any kind. If you are depressed or just don't care or don't see the point, if you don't feel your efforts can make the difference or they are not appropriately valued, then the last thing you will do is help make the site better place. – Dalija Prasnikar Jul 2 at 11:29
129
votes

This has probably already been asked in some capacity, but I want to understand the reasoning of every candidate who decides to run.

With all of the drama that has happened on the site in the last few months, why do you still want to run? What is it that drives you? What motivates you to still want to serve the community in good faith given your efforts will almost always go unnoticed, and that the folks you think have your back may at any point turn against you?

  • 2
    and do you still want to run yourself? last time I seem to remember that it was pretty close. – Jean-François Fabre Jul 1 at 12:17
  • 25
    "...and that the folks you think have your back may at any point turn against you?" -- Wow, that sort of hits home. – Robert Harvey Jul 1 at 17:56
  • 4
    @Jean-FrançoisFabre Still struggling with the answer to my own question... – cs95 Jul 1 at 18:50
  • 4
    my vote will go to candidate who promises to do their best to prevent company diluting and damaging Stack Overflow, even if this may end in a despicable revenge from their side (h/t @RobertHarvey) – gnat Jul 1 at 19:49
  • 3
    @gnat While you and I would both like to see somebody standing up for the community and pushing back against bad policies, I feel like we're not the ones in control here, we're just along for the ride. Besides, I don't think moderators were ever intended to have that level of sway on management. We can shout all we like, but we cannot remove the cotton from their ears. – cs95 Jul 1 at 20:45
  • 3
    per my observations, at least one (probably two) of SO moderators managed to make roughly that level of sway last year – gnat Jul 1 at 20:59
  • @gnat who do you think made that sway? – user3956566 Jul 2 at 9:50
  • 2
    @gnat I'm wondering which particular mods you thought had that sway - who are they? – user3956566 Jul 2 at 11:23
  • 2
    @Yvette I believe it was Robert first of all. I was going to name another moderator who made comparable impact but after closer re-checking other resignation announcements I decided that it would be hard to tell if it was more individual or "cumulative" effect. I then recalled how it felt back then and every resignation announcement at MSO was like a sound of Judgement Day bell – gnat Jul 6 at 14:41
  • 3
    ...yeah I think I missed to point that "team effect". First resignation felt like an earthquake, really, but series of next ones... it was maybe even worse. It was like, "look, there are 25 mods at SO now. Every week or two one of them resigns. This means you've got about 40 weeks until the end of the world. 38 weeks... 36 weeks... 34... etc". It was like watching a train wreck in a slow motion – gnat Jul 6 at 15:08
  • @gnat What are we down to now... 6-8 weeks? – cs95 Jul 6 at 23:29
  • @cs95 things changed after 5th or 6th resignation. Looks like company changed their course and it stopped and I really can't tell now. Guess it depends on how company will act further and on how moderators will handle that. I can't read the future, maybe if it happens yet again mods won't resign at all, or maybe they will choose to resign more frequently or in groups. Anyway, back then it was quite a relief to see it stopped – gnat Jul 6 at 23:49
92
votes

A high rep user of the site has started to link their own library in many of their answers. Tipped off by a flag, you see that they are overtly self promoting themselves, and handle it by deleting their answers and sending them a mod message asking them to update their answers and provide affiliation. The user is arguably furious after reading your message. They then post their own version of the story on meta without giving much information, and cite that you deleted all their answers. The meta crowd, who is half informed about the situation has brought out all pitchforks, as a high rep user has been contacted. What do you do here to de-escalate the increased tensions? Additionally, do you feel that high rep users must be given more leeway than low rep users, or should the law be the same for all?

  • 27
    This is a hypothetical question that is quite likely to happen to any elected moderators, and some form or variation of this has happened to almost all moderators at one time or another. If you can handle this sort of issue publicly and transparently with grace and aplomb, you will be on your way to being a good moderator. – George Stocker Jun 29 at 23:23
  • I think law should be same for all rep users. If there is partiality based on high rep then low rep users will stop them from participating in meta or so – Nagaraju Jul 6 at 5:59
71
votes

In the light of last year's events, anyone running for moderator in current election is either blissfully unaware what happened or totally insane (forgive me for being so blunt).

Prove that you are fully aware of the situation and that, at the same time, you know exactly what you are doing when you are running in this election (that you are not insane).

In particular, moderators are (should be) representatives of the community and its best interests, not the company.

How can you find balance in representing what is the best for community and at the same time avoid conflicting the company to the point where the company may decide to remove your privileges (hopefully, days of public shaming are behind us, but being stripped of the diamond can still bring quite a negative impact)?

  • 9
    Could you please be a candidate for mod? – bad_coder Jun 30 at 12:23
  • 22
    @bad_coder I really appreciate the amount of trust you put in me. But I don't see that happening for two reasons. First, long term problem, is that I don't have enough time to dedicate myself to moderating tasks (besides, few minutes here and there while my code is compiling) and second, short (probably) term problem, is that I am not confident I would be able to answer above question in satisfactory manner ;) – Dalija Prasnikar Jun 30 at 13:43
  • 29
    for the frst problem you have: write bigger code and turn optimization flags on: you'll have more time to moderate. – Jean-François Fabre Jun 30 at 21:05
  • 2
    @Jean-FrançoisFabre When it takes too long, then I am working on two computers simultaneously... so "few minutes now and then" no longer applies. – Dalija Prasnikar Jul 1 at 7:52
  • 2
    ok, so see moderation duties at work as a way to avoid burnout from work, replace it by burnout from moderating :) Seriously, you can try candidating and see how it goes. – Jean-François Fabre Jul 1 at 7:56
  • 2
    @DalijaPrasnikar In the light of last year's events I am new here... and keep seeing statements like these... What happened? can you link me something... – Yatin Jul 1 at 10:27
  • 6
    @Yatin Uh... it is a long story... but here are two links that summarize events meta.stackexchange.com/q/333965/313443 and meta.stackexchange.com/q/342039/313443 – Dalija Prasnikar Jul 1 at 11:58
  • 5
    @Jean-FrançoisFabre Like I said, I really, really, really don't have time and I don't like half arsing things, so if I commit to something I am committed and "see how it goes" would inevitably take time (in case I would be elected, and even election process takes time, too). But beyond that I am really not in place where I would even want to volunteer my free time to SO as company. I know that this is not so much "for the company", but "for community", still... I am really far from motivated right now (except maybe for nuking things ;) – Dalija Prasnikar Jul 1 at 12:08
  • 6
    @Jean-FrançoisFabre Obligatory xkcd ;-) – Bill Tür Jul 1 at 13:35
  • 3
    @DalijaPrasnikar Compile, nuke. Compile, nuke. Coffee, critique. Tea, essay. French intellectual: Jean-François Fabre; Croatian intellectual: Dalija Prasnikar... Perfect!! (Honestly Dalija, it's obvious woman are currently underrepresented among SO mods, it's been widely concluded balanced representation is extremely beneficial - for everyone. Either you or another candidate, it would be something to look forward to. I'm certain on a personal level you would be an excellent mod.) So I'm with Jean-François in thinking you can "try candidating and see how it goes". – bad_coder Jul 1 at 15:21
  • 6
    @Jean-FrançoisFabre I don't think I can come even close to replacing Yvette. Also I am not sure if my POV as a woman will bring too much, except being able to say something men are not commonly "allowed" to say anymore without being accused of sexism. Anyway, I will not try because it was never my intention to try in the first place. Maybe some other time... – Dalija Prasnikar Jul 2 at 8:43
  • 2
    I'm not going to ask you to throw your hat in the ring, but if you ever decide to stand, I'm definitely going to vote for you. You'd certainly make a damn fine mod. – Bhargav Rao Jul 4 at 5:06
  • 3
    @Yatin Basically there was a huge legal battle with one of Stack Exchanges most beloved associate/moderator Monica Cellio. That is why many people's names inclued Reinstate Monica. Shog9 and other long time moderators were let go. There were numerous moderator strikes with more than multiple moderators resigning and "Putting up their diamond." Basically, hell ensued in the scope of the moderators at the end oth last year and beginning of this year. – Neko Musume Jul 4 at 19:09
  • 3
    @Yatin See meta.stackexchange.com/questions/340906/… and read some of the comments and answers fmi on Monica Cellio... – Neko Musume Jul 4 at 19:22
  • 4
    @NekoMusume Shog9 was not just moderator, he was employee. He was let go as well as some other employees (some also left on their own) and that was even bigger hit, because company has lost the most valuable people that knew how sites operate and what sites need. – Dalija Prasnikar Jul 6 at 9:25
54
votes

A user has replied to an increasingly heated comment chain and used an ambiguous yet colloquial word that can be gender neutral to many people, but carries an implicit male context by itself ("dude", "guys", etc.). This comment draws a few red flags, including a custom moderator flag that accuses the person of violating the pronoun code of conduct. There's nothing else flag-worthy about the comment. How would you handle this?

53
votes

Here are two questions but you only need to answer one. It is about how you would interact on Meta.

Your candidate score is > 20

Stack Overflow is moving into a new era with the next generation of developers / engineers / enthusiasts emerging. As you have a high candidate score you have been here long enough to not remember what it was like when you started here as a user (things changed, okay?). Why do you think you are the right person to guide / understand / support the upcoming community that is so much different with different needs and a different attitude? Please elaborate.

Your candidate score is <= 20

Stack Overflow has a history with a vocal community, focused on quality. As you still have opportunities to develop yourself in certain aspects of moderation, you can approach problems with a new and fresh vision. How will you leverage your relative inexperience in engaging with the longstanding users and encouraging the upcoming generation in contributing to the knowledge base SO wants to be? Please elaborate.

  • 4
    "the upcoming community that is so much different with different needs and a different attitude" this may be a bit large of a claim to expect people to answer without evidence/examples. I think the needs are pretty much the same as they were 10 years ago, for example. – TylerH Jun 29 at 21:22
  • 3
    @TylerH let's see if the upcoming community agrees with you ... – rene Jun 29 at 21:24
  • 2
    @rene good thing it's not really up to them :-) A site crafts its own purpose; the needs of the community are: new, interesting, high-quality questions that are well-researched and answerable in an objective or evidence-based way. That should cover all the relevant needs any individuals claim to have, as always (which is my point). Whether they have the right attitude will of course vary from person to person and also is not something we should craft moderator candidates around with much variation. – TylerH Jun 29 at 21:28
  • rene you mean 20k right? – Jean-François Fabre Jun 30 at 21:01
  • 4
    @Jean-FrançoisFabre no, I mean candidate score. – rene Jun 30 at 21:05
  • 1
    damn of course. – Jean-François Fabre Jun 30 at 21:06
  • 1
    As you have a high candidate score you have been here long enough to not remember what it was like when you started here as a user. That's a false premise, I remember what it was like as a new user. The more relevant issue is that a new user 10 years ago would have a quite different experience than a new user nowadays, as the site has changed a lot since then. – wim Jul 6 at 18:55
46
votes

There have been several unpopular features lately, changes in moderation policy forced prompted by SE, and a promise by the company1 to listen to feedback from the community. Given this I have a two-part question (with the second part being the more important part in my view):

  1. What do you think a moderator's role should be when an unpopular feature is rolled out by SE?

  2. What would you, as a moderator, do when faced with a controversial decision announced by the company, one which you personally disagreed with, and felt was bad for the community at large?2

1: I am not stating this promise has been kept.

2: Thanks to Cody Gray for helping me workshop that question (basically putting my idea into better words than I had)

  • 1
    The answers to the second question may not be very insightful. Judging by the past it seems to be either stay or leave, probably coming down to personal preference. – Trilarion Jun 30 at 20:00
  • 7
    @Trilarion yet it tells you something about the person who wishes to still work as a moderator (and stay has many options for which a potential moderators answer could show that they've considered it & have thought about the best course to take in a situation which is highly possible) – LinkBerest Jun 30 at 20:15
40
votes

Here is a set of general questions, gathered as very common questions asked every election. As mentioned in the instructions, the first two questions are guaranteed to show up in the Q&A, while the others are if there aren't enough questions (or, if you like one enough, you may split it off as a separate answer for review within the community's 8).

  • How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?
  • How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

  • In your opinion, what do moderators do?
  • A diamond will be attached to everything you say and have said in the past, including questions, answers and comments. Everything you will do will be seen under a different light. How do you feel about that?
  • In what way do you feel that being a moderator will make you more effective as opposed to simply reaching 10k or 20k rep?
  • How about accepting your answer so that the set questions always appear at the top? – honk Jun 29 at 20:57
  • 27
    Self-answers don't pin when accepted. :) Also, accepting sends the signal to many that the discussion is completed, which it definitely isn't! So, in both ways, accepting won't function as you expect and may squelch new answers and discussion. :) – Catija Jun 29 at 21:01
  • 2
    ok I guess we"ll just have to upvote that one to death then :) – Jean-François Fabre Jun 30 at 20:59
  • 4
    Default question #2 should be replaced with JFF's question. We certainly don't need both, and I like Jean-Francois's better. – Cody Gray Jul 3 at 3:57
  • @CodyGray I see what you're saying but I also feel like they're the opposites... what about combining them into one big question so you get both sides? – Catija Jul 6 at 15:05
39
votes

Given the trials and tribulations that Stack Overflow is facing - not just with some high profile departures from Stack Overflow moderation - what makes you believe that you'll be motivated and capable of handling the many responsibilities of moderation?

  • 4
    Imagine someone who joined Stack Overflow on 2020-01-01 and has nominated themselves for the election. Can you explain what these trials and tribulations are and why should they affect the new moderators? – Dharman Jun 29 at 20:52
  • 36
    @Dharman: A counterpoint: would someone who's not been around quite that long be capable of rebuilding trust between the curators, diamond moderators and CMs? I would think that someone who came on that new was just looking for authority without really understanding the baggage that came along with it. – Makoto Jun 29 at 20:58
  • 1
    Isn't the "Yearling" badge a requirement to make a candidate eligible? – Adrian Mole Jun 30 at 12:23
  • 2
    @AdrianMole No, it isn't, according to the election page. Also, it doesn't necessarily mean that they have been active the entire time, only that their account is at least one year old. – janw Jun 30 at 19:07
38
votes

Do you see moderators as a cooperating team or as a collection of individuals with the "nuke" button? ("nuke" is used as a general term here, but it means all vote cast actions that are binding, plus suspensions/bans)

Could you be convinced by fellow moderators to revert one of your moderating decisions (delete/close/undelete/reopen/suspend/unsuspend)?

  • 4
    Good question; I wish there were a lot more opportunity for SO mods (or other large site mods) to help guide/tutor some smaller site mods on moderation. Would help reinforce the 'cooperating team' ethos. – TylerH Jun 30 at 22:15
  • StackOverflow Teams is a pretty good Q&A site where mods cooperate, ask & answer questions about moderation. Also the Teacher's Lounge chatroom. Not sure if SO mods can teach others or the other way round. Probably both. – Jean-François Fabre Jun 30 at 22:18
  • 4
    Certainly both directions are encouraged. It's just that mods on SO see so much more that by sheer numbers they tend to have a lot more moderation experience to share, and because of the maturity of the site and size of the voting bloc, they tend to be better-matured/tested candidates as well. – TylerH Jun 30 at 22:20
  • 14
    We used to mentor mods in the Teachers' Lounge, before someone brought in a flamethrower... – Cody Gray Jun 30 at 23:26
  • 8
    Wait.... moderators have nuke button.... I am in ;) – Dalija Prasnikar Jul 1 at 7:50
  • 5
    we have a whole panel full of nukes, actually. – Jean-François Fabre Jul 1 at 12:20
  • Isn't this kind of a leading question? ;) I mean is there any change of a candidate saying "There's is noway I'd ever change my mind on a decision"? – Scratte Jul 2 at 9:16
  • maybe the answer could be something between "Okay" and "No way!". – Jean-François Fabre Jul 2 at 10:15
35
votes

The current form of moderation is untenable.

Potential moderators and existing moderators hold little sway, if any, in the direction of the Stack Overflow community.

You are held hostage by corporate interests that as of yet have ignored basic tenets of due process for both community leaders and moderators.

You will get a diamond next to your name, and you get the opportunity to clean up for the failures of the company to endear trust with its community.

Why do you want to do that, and what do you hope to get out of moderating in this environment of “I have altered the deal, pray I don’t alter it any further?”

  • 11
    This cuts right to the heart of the matter other questions (mine included) are asking. This should definitely be asked. – LinkBerest Jul 4 at 12:10
  • 6
    "You are held hostage by corporate interests that as of yet have ignored basic tenets of due process for both community leaders and moderators." My experience has been that general rules (as in even the old "Be Nice" things like name calling) are frequently ignored when it comes to particular social positions that SO's leadership disagrees with, as well. I've had both moderators and employees direct insults at me, for example. – jpmc26 Jul 5 at 7:59
24
votes

You're a newly appointed moderator and you find one of your actions as a moderator called out on meta. You earnestly answer the question and find the answer is heavily downvoted and met with a lot of critical comments, some which are borderline or outright rude.

How do you handle this?

  • 6
    Seems to be the same answer yivi already gave to another question :-) But seriously, this is a good question, because it really gets at the thick-skinned demeanor required to be a moderator on a site like Stack Overflow. – Cody Gray Jul 2 at 19:44
  • 12
    You're a newly appointed moderator ... one of your actions as a moderator called out on meta ... find the answer is heavily downvoted and met with a lot of critical comments: sounds like normal stuff to me. – Jean-François Fabre Jul 2 at 21:03
  • 6
    Ha, as you told me once @Jean-FrançoisFabre, "if you're not getting downvoted, it's not a meta-post". – Christian Dean Jul 2 at 21:06
  • @CodyGray I loved yivi's answer. It made me laugh. There's not been enough fun around here for a loooong while. I'm not sure, are we actually allowed to have fun now? :p – user3956566 Jul 3 at 0:01
  • 8
    I have fun most of the time. I'd say you're allowed to do so, too. (Disclaimer: Experiences may vary. The experience of this individual is not necessarily representative, and no warranties are made or implied regarding the amount of fun that will be had.) – Cody Gray Jul 3 at 5:23
  • 2
    If you haven't been down-voted into meta oblivion at least once, you haven't been participating on meta long enough :) – Lundin Jul 6 at 9:54
21
votes

To what extent would you, as a Moderator, involve yourself in what might be called "site curation" activities? (By this, I mean actions that are also available to many/most 'ordinary' users, such as the closing, reopening and deleting of questions, review queues, et cetera.)

More specifically, what would you want to do to address the current 'hot topics' of:

  1. The huge number of duplicate questions, especially those answered by high-rep users who 'should know better'.
  2. The on-going debate concerning the possible future(s) of "Triage" and "Help & Improvement" queues (notwithstanding the valiant efforts already made by Samuel Liew).
  • Your thumb might be a bit noticeable on the scale concerning "valiant efforts" :). The actual question might need some refining to not show quite as strong a bias toward answers. – Heretic Monkey Jul 5 at 15:59
  • 1
    @HereticMonkey Perhaps I should edit to "vicious efforts?" After all, I was one of Sam's victims. 😉‎ – Adrian Mole Jul 5 at 16:01
20
votes

Stack Exchange took a course of pushing Stack Overflow from being content-centered to increase focus on human interaction, expressing emotions (like the experiment with post reactions).

What do you think about such change?

What would you do if asked by company for feedback about a new social-network like feature they want to implement?

What would you do if such feature gets announced to be live without taking feedback neither from moderators nor the community? How would you handle negative, possibly borderline feedback from the community to such announcement?

14
votes

One of the users has raised a flag containing the following message:

I am flagging this account for voting irregularities. Could a moderator investigate, please?

Upon checking the flag you observe that the account in question belongs to high-rep user (>50k reputation) and you can see the pattern identified by the flagger.

How would you handle this situation and would you handle it differently because of the user's high reputation?

  • 4
    I'm not sure it's entirely fair to ask moderator candidates this, as they don't know any of the details about our tools for investigating or handling voting fraud. They'll learn of this once elected. The only thing that would be vaguely interesting here for moderator candidates is the final question: "would you handle it differently because of the user's high reputation?". And even that doesn't seem especially interesting. – Cody Gray Jul 3 at 3:52
  • 4
    Given that we have a limited number of question slots (and a limited amount of patience to read all candidate answers), perhaps we could merge what this is getting at with respect to a high-rep user into another one of the questions already here? For example, perhaps Bhargav's proposed question, which is quite popular, already covers much of the important ground about dealing with high-rep users. – Cody Gray Jul 3 at 3:53
11
votes

Stack Overflow generates an enormous amount of flags, would you be willing to explore/propose solutions that off load this work to other venues and what would be the potential targets that you believe would benefit the most?

10
votes

One user raises a flag complaining that another user conspicuously avoids their preferred pronoun. How do you handle this?

9
votes

Given the heavy tone of some of these questions, I'm gonna lighten the mood a bit by asking a lighthearted question that isn't directly related to moderating per say, but will get us to know about you a bit.

Other than Stack Overflow, what are your favorite sites on the Stack Exchange network (if any) and why? And, I guess bringing it back around to moderation a little bit, are there things you think Stack Overflow can learn from those sites in terms of how they are run or moderated? Anything you think the smaller sites can learn from Stack Overflow?

  • 2
    are there things you think Stack Overflow can learn from those sites in terms of how they are run or moderated? I think it's the other way around. Other sites are peaceful, including Super User. – 10 Rep Jul 3 at 0:51
6
votes

Have you ever expressed opinions on the site that are contrary to Stack Exchange strategy and policy? If not, why not? If you have, do you think you could handle no longer being able to express those opinions as freely, and would you ever be concerned that your past statements might be held against you if you found yourself in conflict with a new policy?

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    If someone can't agree to the Moderator's agreement, then that would disqualify them from being a moderator by default. So, the question would be whether or not if someone would resign if a change to the policy conflicted with their own beliefs, and that's...not something that I would expect a candidate to be able to answer before such a change lands. – Makoto Jul 1 at 14:37
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    @Makoto, Do you mean this agreement? I ask because there is really nothing in there (or the Terms of Service) that says anything about openly disagreeing with StackExchange policy. But there have been problems with moderators when such disagreements, and their handling, have come to light. This is one of my biggest concerns about becoming a moderator myself, and I think it's reasonable that any future moderator give us their opinion on this. It's directly relevant considering recent events. – ouflak Jul 1 at 17:43
5
votes

You've handled a flag and decided to decline it. The user posts on meta. They reference the help center and several other meta posts, and they explain their confusion about the result of the flag. You do not notice the meta post until months later, and the post doesn't have an answer. You realize now that you handled the flag wrong. What do you do?

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    I mean... there is really only one sensible course of action: Nuke the user's account, hard-delete the meta-question, redact the original flagged post, change your name and appearance and assume a new identity in a far away country with no local SO representation. Right? – yivi Jul 2 at 8:32
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    @yivi :D Good point. I forgot add the follow up question of "Why?" – Scratte Jul 2 at 8:49
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    Mods can't hard-delete, @yivi – Cody Gray Jul 2 at 9:03
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    Oh, well. No nomination for me I guess. I'm glad that's the only part of my comment you object @Cody. ;) – yivi Jul 2 at 9:06
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    The mods let each other know when there's a meta post concerning their actions. It's unlikely to fall through the cracks. – user3956566 Jul 2 at 9:56
  • @Yvette Well.. that's just very curious, I'd say. I suppose I should update my Question to "You've noticed such a post isn't being answered by anyone at all. What do you do?" :D – Scratte Jul 2 at 9:59
  • I'd thought it was worth mentioning. I'm not saying it can't ever happen, but the mods do discuss it and will ping the mod who handled the flag. – user3956566 Jul 2 at 10:00
  • @Yvette But in all fairness, perhaps an aspiring moderator isn't aware of the "heads up", or was temporarily away on holiday or military duty.. or.. – Scratte Jul 2 at 10:01
  • if they are absent another mod will provide an answer - don't forget if it's about a declined flag, it's likely they will be active. – user3956566 Jul 2 at 10:03
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    I was trying to help you, I didn't realise you were taking it as argumentative, sorry. – user3956566 Jul 2 at 10:08
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    @Yvette :) Sorry. I do see most of those meta posts being answered, so of course you are mostly right :) – Scratte Jul 2 at 10:13
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    Any realistic answers to this will boil down to "shit happens", some questions will be missed. I wonder what kind of answers you would expect and accept to such a question? "As a moderator, I would do my utmost best to make sure that every complaint about my actions will be followed up with as quickly as possible, with apologies made where I was mistaken, and a good hard look at the rules if maybe your complaint was very valid"? And you would believe that, and vote for that candidate based on that? – CodeCaster Jul 2 at 22:08
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    @CodeCaster An answer could also be "I would try to fix the error that I made. But I would leave the meta post alone. There's no reason to bring it back to the front page, when it's been sitting for so long" – Scratte Jul 2 at 22:13
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    I would be more inclined to believe the honest answer: "Shit happens. Handling a gazillion tons of flags is hard, and mistakes are bound to happen. You'll get over it. A declined flag is not a big deal." Would that have won your vote, @CodeCaster? – Cody Gray Jul 3 at 10:50
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    @CodeCaster It's a combination of accountability and rating an answer on the bs-meter. – Scratte Jul 3 at 11:11
1
vote

What is your opinion about unpopular Answers on meta:

  • Do you think they should gray out or remain fully visible?
  • Will you be trying to have them removed or will you try to keep them un-deleted?

Explain why.

Do you have a similar opinion about Questions on meta? Why? Or Why not?

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    One could perhaps extend or replicate a similar question for abruptly deleted Meta questions. – E_net4 the account reporter Jul 5 at 19:51
  • @E_net4ofthedownvotebrigade Added :) Feel free to edit if you think it should be phrased differently. – Scratte Jul 5 at 19:59
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    Moderators have no control over #1. The other questions about allowing deletion of unpopular Meta Q&A are reasonable and do actually concern things that moderators have control over. – Cody Gray Jul 5 at 23:40
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    @CodyGray Even though a user doesn't have control over something doesn't mean they don't have an opinion about it :) In a way, the two bullet points are sort of intertwined. – Scratte Jul 6 at 5:14
0
votes

A fellow moderator or user is slandered in public outside of Stack Exchanges's network by a Stack Exchange's employee.

What would you do if you were a moderator? And if a normal user?

What would you do if, after your initial efforts, neither the employee nor Stack Exchange back down from such slander?

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    I don't see how this is an interesting or enlightening question. There is virtually nothing that a moderator can do in situations like this, other than throw a big fit and/or resign. In what way would such answers inform your decision on who to vote for? – Cody Gray Jul 5 at 11:31
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    I think answers to this question could be interesting and useful. I recall about handful different forms of civil disobedience available to moderators practiced and / or discussed during recent sad events. I think that having this discussed in questionnaire answers would help us get better prepared to handle similar difficulties in the future. Forewarned is forearmed and such – gnat Jul 6 at 5:44
-8
votes

Say you come across a comments section where two users are talking. The first user is > 100k, and the second is a new contributor. The new contributor is asking why their post was downvoted, and the >20k user tries to explain things and gets frustrated, and becomes rude.

You delete their comment, and they put a post on meta about your rudeness. What do you do? What is your reaction?

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    Deleting comments is not rude. – Samuel Liew Jul 3 at 2:28
  • We're talking about a new user @SamuelLiew. – 10 Rep Jul 3 at 3:37
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    You delete their comment Which comment? The new contributor's or the hi-rep user's? If it's the second: the high rep user, who knows perfectly well the rules of CoC, visits Meta to complain? I find that unlikely. I also find it unlikely that a mod would delete only one comment and leave behind a discussion disjointed. – Mari-Lou A Jul 3 at 8:33
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    This is potentially a valid question but needs to be completely reworded. For example: “A high-rep user posts a complaint on SO meta about your behaviour/answer/chat message etc. How do you react?” However my suggestion is practically a replicate of this meta.stackoverflow.com/a/398991/3618829 – Mari-Lou A Jul 3 at 8:36
  • Hopefully the moderator would know that both sets of comments should be removed, unless the ones from the high reputation user were not actually rude. Regardless, at this point one would expect that moderators do not need to explain themselves every time someone complains about deleted comments. – E_net4 the account reporter Jul 3 at 8:46
-9
votes

Considering the recent events, are you willing to become a mod? Are you willing to take up a duty that is perhaps dangerous in the current situation?

Are you willing to listen to other and older mods? What, in your opinion, is the right thing:

  1. Act immediately when seeing something big.

  2. Don't rush to your gut's instinct and answer: take your time.

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    Dangerous? Isn't that a bit much? – yivi Jul 3 at 4:30
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    I'd reframe the question: “Considering recent events, why are you applying to be a mod?Are you willing to listen to others and to more experienced mods?” [This is a no brainer] “What, in your opinion, is the right thing to do? 1. Act immediately when an egregious situation occurs. 2. Reflect, ignore your gut's instinct and bide your time.” – Mari-Lou A Jul 3 at 8:24
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    Your question is very similar to meta.stackoverflow.com/a/398895/3618829 – Mari-Lou A Jul 3 at 9:05

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