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This question concerns the following answer deleted an hour ago by one of the SE employees.

https://meta.stackoverflow.com/a/398452

<10k screenshot

I understand that the post was written in a slight tongue in cheek manner, so maybe the company decided it crossed the line when it comes to being friendly. Possibly this advice might have been ignored:

Be inclusive and respectful.
Avoid sarcasm and be careful with jokes — tone is hard to decipher online. Prefer gender-neutral language when uncertain. If a situation makes it hard to be friendly, stop participating and move on.

However, I don't find it to be offensive or ruder than the other answers in that thread. It was a legitimate response to the feature release.

This answer did not:

  • attack anyone personally
  • intend to offend or alienate people based on race, gender, sexual orientation, or religion
  • aim to harass anyone

It was not a personal message; it was a community answer!

Us users, we are taught to respect other answers and do not delete wrong answers or answers we do not agree with. Why has the company decided to delete an answer that a lot of community members agreed with? Has the answer broken some invisible rule? If so what was offensive about this answer that an employee had to step it? Was there a rude or abusive flag raised against it? Did someone contact the company with a complaint? This was the only answer in that thread deleted in that manner.

We would like an explanation of why is our voice not heard and our positively scoring answers are deleted without an explanation.

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  • 12
    I don't think we've lost anything useful with the deletion of that answer. – Kevin B Jun 19 at 20:48
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    @KevinB We didn't get anything useful from the whole thread, but that is not a reason to delete random posts. – Dharman Jun 19 at 20:49
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    I would like to note that sometimes, people consider rude when you repeat the same thing several times (ie. a breaking point). Read from the 7th paragraph onwards – Braiam Jun 19 at 20:51
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    @KevinB One might argue that 61 participants on meta found it useful. The tooltip literally says "Upvote this if you find it clear and useful". – Ian Campbell Jun 19 at 20:51
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    not only one of the SE employees. but the community manager – Temani Afif Jun 19 at 20:51
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    @IanCampbell One might instead argue 71 participants found it funny, or fun, or interesting, who knows. It's certainly not an answer trying to discus the topic at hand or provide feedback. – Kevin B Jun 19 at 20:52
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    I upvoted it because it said what I felt. I personally agree with the words in that post, but I can't speak for the other 60 upvotes. – Dharman Jun 19 at 20:53
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    @KevinB So.. exactly like the feature that was introduced.. that's a message, and it should be visible. – Scratte Jun 19 at 20:57
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    actually I like that answer. I might spend few time to add some emoji. Even if deleted it's still there ;) too bad <10K Users cannot see it – Temani Afif Jun 19 at 21:22
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    So it seems that the proposed 👎 Finish him reaction was applied to the answer. – E_net4 is taking a break Jun 20 at 8:21
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    I think it was an answer not worth creating a fuss over deleting - at least it made me chuckle several times which is a rare effect discussion on new features has lately. I also found it useful as it is a grotesque of what we might end up with (we do not burn 1984 for being a grotesque of authoritarian regimes, do we?). Some of the wording (the preface could be less sarcastic) certainly needed fixing, though (last time I saw it, the last one "rock" emoji) and at rev 27 it was a bit too much. Regardless, now instead of a somewhat funny wiki to let off steam we are arguing about post deletion... – Oleg Valter Jun 20 at 8:29
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    Ah, thanks for clarifying! Just a small note: I don't disagree with you. Its just that my reasoning differs slightly - I don't understand why, even if we assume the answer warranted deletion, it was deemed useful to delete it given the situation - even in the worst case, it was harmless. Such decisions, albeit being done in good faith, sparkle completely unnecessary controversy... – Oleg Valter Jun 20 at 12:09
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    Satire didn't die the day Kissinger won a Nobel prize, but it does seem not everyone appreciates it as a valid way of making a point. – francescalus Jun 20 at 12:13
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    This falls under the banner of "pick your battles carefully." The censorship argument was lost a long time ago; Stack Exchange is a privately-owned website, and they can do whatever they wish with the content that is posted here. Stack Exchange employees have demonstrated on several occasions that they are very sensitive to criticism of any kind; those who want to post content on meta should take that into consideration, if they wish to be heard. – Robert Harvey Jun 24 at 16:52
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    Finally, just in case you think I was in favor of deleting that answer; I'm not. But it seems that everyone at Stack Exchange corporate has lost the ability to appreciate humor. – Robert Harvey Jun 24 at 17:17
-19

Why it got deleted

I deleted that answer after talking to the moderators because I believe it does little to no good, and some harm. It was flagged as Not an Answer, which is accurate. We usually don't allow things to be off-topic or not an answer because they're funny. I mean, it's fine to say the feature is bad or that you don't like it, but that crosses a threshold to not nice.

I understand people are frustrated with the feature and how it was implemented, that's okay. This feature was launched in breach of what we're operating under (which is gathering feedback before launching), so... I get it. However, two wrongs a right do not make. "Be nice" is not meant only towards things we're happy with or mildly annoyed by. People don't like it, no problem, part of the reason this is a test, but it's not okay to jump to snarky answers that add nothing to the discussion and make the environment a little more hostile.

Intentions, Goals & Results

Language is a bad proxy for intent, so, assuming best intentions, I think it was not meant to cause harm or offend anyone, absolutely - but I also want y'all to think about what is the goal and what is the result of the answers there in general.

If the goal is to convey: this feature has problems, it's not in good shape and we don't like it. There are good ways to do so, in fact, several there were respectfully done: you can state so, you can point flaws (and good thoughts too), you can share concerns and ask for data, you can relay how the feature is risky and abusable, you can even share ways to hide it. All that is super valid, helpful, and moves the discussion forward.

If the goal is to make a joke: it's a funny joke, not going to deny. However, hopefully, we can agree that posting a joke as an answer is not an answer and it doesn't move things forward in a good way. What good was that answer adding to the discussion? It's especially not worth a laugh if it makes the environment appear more hostile towards employees because the joke is on them.

I think some of the answers on that thread are... not the best of what meta has to offer. The result is that they make CMs' jobs harder, they make meta appear more of a hostile environment and they make it harder for employees to feel confident to engage here - all things that we don't want to happen. Feedback that is delivered in an overly snarky way is easier to ignore, that's counter-productive to the goal/intent to convey your thoughts.

I especially disagree with the reasoning "troll answer for troll feature. at least it's funny" for similar reasons to those I've shared before on a different subject: a previous slight should not make us feel justified to slight in return. Please remember to avoid sarcasm and be careful with jokes, especially in charged, already negative situations like that one. Tone is hard to decipher online and snark definitely doesn't help.

We really want to help people engage more with meta and feel more confident and less anxious when doing so, answers like that make that harder to happen. Please help us make that happen :)

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    I felt it was censored, and it was. By doing so, you made it immortal and non forgettable. You may have wanted it to go away. But in doing so, you may just have made it stronger. – Scratte Jun 22 at 17:40
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    "We really want to help people engage more with meta" The perfect opportunity for this would be to post a request for feedback on a feature/idea before going live with it. 99% of the issues the Meta community have with the company over the last few years is that they have stopped doing this. Same for all such controversial changes (surely you knew it would be a controversial one?); ask us for feedback so you can fix problems and perceptions ahead of time. In business terms it's called 'getting in front of' an issue. – TylerH Jun 22 at 18:01
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    "We really want to help people engage more with meta" - oh, and bringing back hot meta posts would really help here, too. – TylerH Jun 22 at 18:01
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    @TylerH agreed - I even say so myself on the post, so no contention there. It should've gone through feedback because that's how we're operating, and it didn't. And that was a failure. – Cesar M Jun 22 at 18:02
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    @Scratte No, it means that if the community doesn't want the feature, their feedback will be removed or completely ignored and nothing else will happen. Nothing new really. – GrumpyCrouton Jun 22 at 18:14
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    I can accept this explanation, however I would like to point out one thing. When this experiment was announced on meta it made people upset, and rightfully so. "What an unbelievably unnecessary thing.", "why are you wasting time on such things that bring nothing?". At first people were not joking, the announcement was a huge disappointment. When this answer was posted it helped us to take it less seriously. It relieved the tension. Sure, it was heavy criticism, but so were most of the answers. When you deleted it, it only agitated the community again. – Dharman Jun 22 at 18:24
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    I don't know if there is any evidence that this answer heightened hostilities. The only thing that angered and offended the community is that you never asked us for feedback before doing this experiment. You ignored us and then when we expressed our disapproval you decided to delete and censor our response. That was a pretty hostile action. If you had concerns about this answer you could have left a short comment explaining why the company believes this answer is inappropriate. – Dharman Jun 22 at 18:24
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    A simple message in the form of "We're sorry, but this post is not a respectful way of expressing disapproval with the feature." would provide an explanation and set a precedent for other answers. We deal with really bad behavior on main on regular basis. We are the front-line that deals with trash, spam, noise and rudeness on this site. We have to defuse tensions and we can take it when someone tells us that we are crossing a line and we should back off. But please do not delete our replies without any explanation, just because the company couldn't take a little sarcasm. – Dharman Jun 22 at 18:25
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    I give this answer 1 😐⬆️. It neither pleases me nor offends me. I thank you for stepping out and explaining your reasons for it, although I personally disagree with them. If we look at the old "When to flag as "not an answer" post: "Moderators do not judge the technical correctness of answers." but you just judged it as NAA. The answer pointed out the fear for a "social media emojifest" direction, which sounds like an on-topic answer to me. – Remy Jun 22 at 18:56
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    Thanks for posting your reasoning, Cesar. I appreciate the transparency. To add my $0.02, I upvoted the emoji answer because I thought it did a good job of illustrating, through obvious satire, the risk of Stack Overflow trying to copy social-like sites such as dev.to. Nothing against dev.to - they have some good content and it kinda makes sense to give ♥ and 🦄 in their content-sharing community. But I don't think 🦄 reactions belong on a professional encyclopedia. – Nate Barbettini Jun 22 at 20:19
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    Tl;dr - I don't think the answer was only funny with no value. I do think it added value to the discussion by asserting it is undesirable to chase trends like emoji reactions too far. – Nate Barbettini Jun 22 at 20:27
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    "The result is that they make CMs' jobs harder, they make meta appear more of a hostile environment and they make it harder for employees to feel confident to engage here" -- Well, yeah; unpopular feature will attract negative critique. Demanding people be reasonable in the face of actions in breach of the process...is being unreasonable. Two wrongs don't make a right, but neither do three wrongs. But you've just kinda streisanded the answer, giving the reception that much more attention, making it even harder to make Meta easier to engage with. – fbueckert Jun 24 at 12:32
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    This answer could be shorten dramatically to "👎 C(a)esar says finish off the answer" - if only we had an answer to propose such reactions.... – samcarter_is_at_topanswers.xyz Jun 24 at 13:18
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    In taking the action to delete this particular post based on - from what I can tell - the feedback didn't come across in the tone or shape you guys liked - you have made us look like the bad guys, and we all get to play our role in the drama triangle which really didn't have to exist. We wanted to engage with you, or we wouldn't have bothered posting answers! – Makoto Jun 25 at 7:05
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    My blunt opinion: we're here to be engaged with, not to be treated like children. I will not subscribe to a philosophy that allows the company to figuratively run my foot over (e.g. introduce a new feature with no prior discussion), and the only thing that can escape my mouth is, "While I appreciate that you were driving in a hurry, I would greatly value it if you could stay with me while 911 is dispatched." – Makoto Jun 25 at 7:05
72

I disagree that the post in question is "not an answer".

It does give feedback -- which is a valid reason to answer to a meta post -- by parodying the feature, to showcase just how absurd and out of place it is in the author's opinion.

So you have my vote to undelete it (I cannot cast it on the post itself because it was deleted by a moderator).

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    I am impressed how a simple thanks feature lead us to all this. Now I am spending time looking for emojis instead of doing something useful 😑 – Temani Afif Jun 19 at 21:46
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    You kind of miss the point if your only argument is on whether that is NAA or not. I found some revisions to contain text suggestions that might be close to or violating the code of conduct. That is red-flagable in my book and doesn't need any more reason to delete such answer. – rene Jun 19 at 21:57
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    @rene as per the Word of God, the only consideration for deletion was NAA, nothing about wording. Besides, wording is fixable, unlike the general theme. – ivan_pozdeev Jun 19 at 23:14
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    It was about the wording. The specific complaint was that it was a "troll" answer. That included not just the wording, but the overall contents. – Cody Gray Jun 20 at 2:41
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    @CodyGray as per the same post, that complaint was brushed off by mods – ivan_pozdeev Jun 20 at 10:49
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    Satire is not protected speech when the arbiter is a private organization, unfortunately. – TylerH Jun 22 at 17:53
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Rare thing on meta, the answer was flagged as "not an answer". I declined the flag with this text:

declined - troll answer for troll feature. at least it's funny

because, hey, we need some fun on meta too and this was innocuous (and also because I agree with the general meta consensus that this feature clutters the site, I'd rather have really useful features, like ... more winter hats). Plus it was Community Wiki, so it wasn't even to hunt for badges.

But Cesar (Community Manager) insisted that the answer was not answering the question. It's true that there's a lot of trolling and no real arguments for or against the feature (even if we can guess what the author thinks about it)

Cesar didn't delete it right away though: he took the time to talk about it in the blue room (moderator private chatroom), something I appreciated a lot, and I said that he could delete it if he felt like it. Then when he deleted the answer, he asked again:

I deleted it, if anyone feels strongly it shouldn't be deleted I'm available to talk here (in the blue room)

I'm not going to go against a CM for that answer, so it will remain deleted. At least Stack Overflow officially deleted it, not a moderator. It's logical that Stack Overflow employees are defending this feature after all.

If you want to consult an off-topic Q&A which hasn't been deleted and made our day check this: Are the Stack Overflow mugs dishwasher or microwave safe?

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    "At least StackOverflow officially deleted it, not a moderator." which is far worse IMHO. Why do employees delete our posts that are not breaking any rules? 61 people felt it was an answer to the question. It expressed how we feel about this new feature and our general disagreement. It was not a comment, it was not another question; it was a reply to the feature announcement. I am really offended by the way Stack Overflow treated our input into the discussion. – Dharman Jun 19 at 21:19
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    What was Cesar's argument against this answer? – Dharman Jun 19 at 21:20
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    did you discuss in the blue room about deleting the question and also the feature with it? – Temani Afif Jun 19 at 21:20
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    The answer was an analogy of the new feature. The new feature is more funny than informative. – Dharman Jun 19 at 21:22
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    I went to the Question list on meta. On my system it's set to 50 per page. I noticed that the 2 posts below this is implemented despite discussion and despite the vote count. I didn't answer this particular post because I felt it was pointless. My time was better spent in an attempt of sending the message with humor through that wiki answer. To me it's most certainly "answering the question". – Scratte Jun 19 at 21:23
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    SE is a company, not a democracy. Unfortunately for us, (or fortunately, if you like a system with a cohesive strategy even if you disagree with said strategy,) we have little say in what does and doesn't get implemented. When a feature is released like this, take it as an opportunity to provide constructive criticism, as it's probably the only time your opinion on the matter will be read by someone with influence to actually change things. – Kevin B Jun 19 at 21:27
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    "okay, but we must admit that this answer was more funny that it was informative" - if that's a metric on its own, there's several posts that could potentially be deleted, including a certain zalgo post related to parsing HTML with regex – Zoe Jun 19 at 21:30
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    yeah, but this regex answer isn't mocking an important feature of the site. – Jean-François Fabre Jun 19 at 21:31
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    The thanks feature is absolutely not important, useful, or necessary in any way – Zoe Jun 19 at 21:31
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    @Zoe that was sarcasm – Jean-François Fabre Jun 19 at 21:33
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    Obligatory reaction: 😆🔼 – Zoe Jun 19 at 21:34
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    That question about Stack Overflow dishwasher mugs is not off-topic. It's about Stack Overflow swag. I guess you could argue it is "no longer reproducible", though, since Stack Overflow swag no longer exists... :-( – Cody Gray Jun 20 at 2:26
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    "I'm not going to go against a CM for that answer" makes it sound like them asking was a courtesy and not a question. – Patrick Kelly Jun 22 at 21:28
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    @PatrickKelly Yes, that's exactly how I interpreted it, too. But these days, even the courtesy is appreciated... – Cody Gray Jun 24 at 10:51
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    @KevinB Then I would say SE failed the whole thing from the beginning. If they're a company, they shouldn't have advertised democracy as a highlight in the first place, worse they've done it everywhere (help center, tour, elections etc.). – iBug Jun 24 at 12:39
38

The deletion happened on a flawed premise, in that the answer was only sarcasm and wasn't useful.

I'll agree that the answer was full of sarcasm and prose, but if we look just a little underneath the covers, we see an answer which takes this new "Thanks" feature to a logical extreme - that Stack Overflow is attempting to become a social media site of some description by offering users social media-like interaction buttons.

I can respect that the company doesn't appreciate the perspective, but to consider deleting it wholesale - despite its shortcomings - doesn't strike me as wanting to engage. It's quite the opposite, really - it means that we haven't learned the lessons of yesteryear, nor do we believe that users are engaging in good faith.

Let's be realistic now. The OP absolutely could have presented their position a bit more straightforwardly, in that the real message was that they saw this button as the beginning of a wave of more buttons with which one could add a quick reaction of some kind to a post. If that's not what Stack Overflow wants, then the feedback provided in that post could go a long way to help reinforce that's not what's intended. I feel like a better staff response would be to say that this is a slippery slope, and that there wasn't any intention to do something like this.

You know, get to the heart of the matter.

But, instead, an answer is deleted. Jean, it's fine that you didn't want to defend it, since I can't disagree with you about its quality on paper.

But at some point, you're going to have to stop reading things so literally and start interpreting things with the belief that no one is here to insult, inflame or belittle another person's perspective.

Someone needs to convince me that someone wants to actually listen to feedback. I'm starting to worry that my own flavor of constructive criticism will be simply "removed".

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    The answer was not interpreted as: "here to insult, inflame or belittle another person's perspective.". Intent matters, totally - but it matters more when deciding punishment or the severity of it, not when deciding to remove content. Content that is harmful is harmful whether the intent to harm was there or not, the answer was deleted for how it encouraged harmful discussion and behavior, not for whether the intent was to do that or not. – Cesar M Jun 22 at 17:22
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    In terms of feedback: an answer does not have to be visible for the feedback it provides to be considered. It's not because a button was pressed that it becomes ignored in any reporting we do. – Cesar M Jun 22 at 17:25
  • On the subject of social media: I hate social media as much as a lot of people, less than some (I still have profiles). All my profiles are dead and I post very, very rarely and engage with nothing. I wholeheartedly dislike social media. But... let's agree: SO is not interested in being a social media platform and one reaction button does not a SM website make. – Cesar M Jun 22 at 17:28
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    @CesarM This is not exactly just "one reaction button", though. It is a feature as prominent as, and more accessible than, the upvote/downvote buttons. It also comes in after a long wave of changes that strive to make the network more social and more about people than about content. It's certainly much more a "social media" feature than not a "social media" feature. – TylerH Jun 22 at 17:57
  • @TylerH monitoring how it affects upvotes is something that the CMs have been loud and clear internally, and if it reduces upvotes, then it should be considered a big problem and reason to revisit things. As for People vs Content I think that's a much larger conversation than that feature - still, it's still one button, and one button doesn't make the site a social media platform - nor that's the goal or, imo, should ever be. – Cesar M Jun 22 at 18:01
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    @CesarM one reaction button on SO, 3 (maybe more...been a while since I used it) on Jobs, so many on Teams that my company is leaving Stack Teams and moving to a different platform because it violates the regulations we must abide by: the answer given there was not looking so far-fetched to me – LinkBerest Jun 23 at 1:12
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    @CesarM: What I'm interpreting this response as is that satire or satirical prose is not only frowned upon, but is seen as actively harmful. Given that this isn't even close to what purpose satire serves, I don't see a clear path to engage in terms of feedback that isn't blessed or sanctioned by the powers that be, which would only allow us to be Caesars who are only capable of expressing feedback in terms of the position of our thumbs, or our voting arrows. – Makoto Jun 23 at 4:03
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    Furthermore, your remark - that this doesn't turn the site into a social media platform - would have been a far better response than this. We've effectively turned what was a sarcastic, satire-laden piece of feedback into something contentious that we must yet again return to the Book of Grievances for and add another pointless excerpt. I wish we (the community and the company) wouldn't bicker like this. – Makoto Jun 23 at 4:04
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    @Makoto Being a Theater grad I'm okay-ly versed in what satire is, it's an effective thing and art form in itself, sure. It probably wouldn't be my pick for relationship-building, mending ways and creating rapport with someone who's interested in hearing from you. The whole ridiculing and shaming thing is not really a good tool to create a two way conversation, it assumes one party doesn't want to have a conversation and you're only option left is to make fun of them. So, yeah, ideally we don't ridicule and shame employees for their work when they're trying to have a conversation? – Cesar M Jun 23 at 17:51
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    @CesarM I hoped that the feedback wanted in the "thank-you" post was for honest feedback. But it seemed odd that this feature what just dumped on us, and I suspected that the feedback wanted was for positive feedback, not constructive feedback. With the removal of the post I'm even more suspicious of what kind of feedback you actually wanted or what kind of feedback will even be heard or respected. I asked a question on your own post here. It's not been answered, which only serves to strengthen this suspicion. So, I now just ask myself if my time spent on this site is worth it. – Scratte Jun 24 at 9:40
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    @CesarM - I think "ideally we don't ridicule and shame employees for their work when they're trying to have a conversation" exactly indicates the reason why people feel offended and sometimes give feedback in "snarky" answers like the one in question. The problem is that even I can agree that this was no attempt at conversation. Such an attempt would be: "We are planning on bringin the feature to public SO. What do you think?", not the "Just letting you know we rolled out the feature" (I tend to assume best intentions, but it is very hard to interpret the post any other way)... – Oleg Valter Jun 25 at 9:29
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    ...Note that there was no mention of any "feedback" in the post except "bugs and issues", only "monitoring data" suggesting that the feature is set in stone and the only feedback needed is purely technical. The unwelcoming response was a guarantee at this point, and I am pleasantly surprized that answers provided mostly provide constructive criticism and suggestions on what could be done instead to solve the problem at hand. That said, I am not advocating for the answer (nor I think it was harmful) and your concern that "they started first" is not a valid argument for ridiculing anyone... – Oleg Valter Jun 25 at 9:32
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    @OlegValter - I appreciate a lot of what you wrote, I disagree that discussing the deletion is counter-productive. Clearly there are different expectations on how far Be Nice applies and in which case exceptions should be made. Discussion helps make PoVs clear and people to make better-informed decisions. The part I disagree with your thoughts is: "A warning coupled with edits would've been better". There were no "parts" that were unfriendly, the whole answer was. Editing it to remove it would've mean defacing it (would've sparked a worse problem). Deleting was the cleanest, lightest action. – Cesar M Jun 25 at 16:53
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    @CesarM - thank you for responding to the comments, but I think you mistook my intention as more argessive than it actually is. First, about the feedback - I am not accusing anyone of not wanting the feedback. I am saying that it appeared that way (the downvotes, comments and some of the answers I think confirm that) - which I think is one of the main reasons the feature was met with an outright refusal. Please, try to hear me here (the inclusion of "...we wouldn't have bothered to announce it here" is the sign of me failing to convey the point) - in the announcement itself there was... – Oleg Valter Jun 25 at 17:11
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    @OlegValter Oh no, sorry if it came across that way, I don't think you were aggressive at all. I do appreciate a lot of what you wrote :) that's a fair point that it appeared that way, and I can see that. That's a good failure of the post to have in mind going forward. – Cesar M Jun 25 at 17:23
34

My issue with deleting the answer, in no particular order:

1. It was a satirical answer.

Satire is not only commonly accepted but one of the best forms of critique. Good satire is hard to do well; but even middling satire can be useful. This is one such answer. It got me to think of the problem with emojis without trying to answer the question head-on; but rather through satirical example. In this way, the answer added to the sum total of knowledge imparted in that question rather than taking away from it. This should be one of the chief reasons to keep an answer around.

Sometimes, it's not what you say that matters, it's how you say it. This answer took a unique approach for the how and should be rewarded, not deleted.

2. Deleting it looks like catty behavior on the part of the employee who deleted it, and reflects poorly on Stack Overflow (the company) as a whole.

You don't 'win' when you delete it, all you do is remind the community that you can't take criticism. If you can't take criticism, you're in the wrong line of work if your job is community management. A better way to handle it would be to acknowledge its strengths (the satire and humor portion) while ignoring any parts you felt were 'trolling', and take the point made in the argument. You don't have to do anything about it, but even acknowledging the point goes a long way to both show you can take criticism, and that satire won't bother you.

3. An employee deleting it usurped the domain of the community elected moderators who are tasked with being the front lines in dealing with the community.

A moderator handled the flag, and declined it. Your first stop should have been to talk to the moderator about your concerns, and then leave it alone. If you want your communities to be self-sufficient, they need to handle their own issues. If you want your three CMs to handle all the problems, then by all means, keep dealing with problems that are the domain of your community elected moderators.

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    TBH Cesar talked to us in the blue room. Okay, then he deleted the answer. This is meta users should have more leeway than on the main site to post funny answers. – Jean-François Fabre Jun 22 at 18:51
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This answer did not:

  • attack anyone personally
  • intend to offend or alienate people based on race, gender, sexual orientation, or religion
  • aim to harass anyone

I made the last edit on that answer before it was deleted because I certainly felt that some phrases could be interpreted falling into one of those bullets you mention. My other option was to flag for mod attention but being on Meta (it is all fun here) and as the answer was seeing a reasonable amount of upvotes I thought trying to salvage it while keeping it way inside the Code of Conduct was worth trying. Just to prevent yet another outcry on meta because a not so useful answer gets deleted due to flags or staff intervention.

We failed, let's learn and move on.

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    Thank you for your efforts in trying to salvage it, but in my opinion, your edit was trifling. The part you edited was certainly least controversial of the whole post. The usefulness of an answer is a very subjective thing. – Dharman Jun 19 at 21:12
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    I'm not sure moving on is the right thing to do. Move on to what? Acceptance? Defeat? – Scratte Jun 19 at 21:13
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    @Scratte we live in a free world, you chose your destiny, I chose mine. – rene Jun 19 at 21:20
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    @Scratte avenge the post by writing a new and different post that makes fun of this waste of time "feature", preferably with 60-80% more sarcasm – Zoe Jun 19 at 21:41
  • @Zoe Thanks, but.. it's pointless, and it's too late to get noticed. – Scratte Jun 19 at 21:48

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