2

This question,

Isn't it silly that a tiny favicon requires yet another HTTP request? How can I put the favicon into a sprite?,

was asked and answered a long time ago (2011).

It's a good question - how can we reliably associate a favicon with a webpage without that leading to another HTTP request?

The answers point to the technology that was available at the time the question was asked.

(2011 was several centuries ago, right?)

But... in late 2019, Chrome introduced support for SVG favicons.

This development makes possible an excellent solution - possibly a definitive solution - which could never have been reasonably proposed prior to 2020. For the last couple of years, only Firefox has had support for SVG favicons and before that, no browser did.

So here is my answer:

This solution necessarily comes nine years after the question was originally asked, because...

Is there a way to raise the profile of that answer, or is there nothing to be done?

6
  • I'm guessing the downvoter is saying something like: "Old solutions are best. We don't need to reinvent the wheel and we certainly don't need to advocate reinvention."
    – Rounin
    Jun 17 '20 at 22:09
  • 4
    Old solutions are indeed the best. I post on SO from a Symbian phone, via Microsoft Proxy server 2.0 on a Windows NT 4 box. With a 33k modem.
    – Caius Jard
    Jun 17 '20 at 22:19
  • 5
    This meta question will end up raising the profile of that answer a lot.
    – pppery
    Jun 17 '20 at 22:21
  • 2
    I did the same here: stackoverflow.com/a/49618941/8620333 and the upvote came slowly. Let the time do its job Jun 17 '20 at 23:18
  • 1
    @TemaniAfif - Thanks. That's reassuring to read.
    – Rounin
    Jun 17 '20 at 23:26
  • Hmm. I did add a bounty to the question, but it looks like my 2020 answer will still need another 149 upvotes before it reaches second place. If I remember to do so, I'll go back and look at the question in 2025 and see how it's getting on against the answers from 2011.
    – Rounin
    Jun 22 '20 at 20:45
6

You leave the upvoting system to work its magic, possibly helped by comments on any particularly out of date answers pointing out solid reasons why it's out of date (don't promote your answer, just a comment for future visitors like "note: This only works up to version XYZ released in 1998" etc.)

Owners of old answers might take responsibility for removing it or editing in a banner if they're no longer relevant but overall if you make it compelling and comprehensive enough, the voting system will start driving the end result you seek.

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  • Thanks, It's not so much that the answers from the beginning of last decade are obsolete. They probably still work. It's more that they would likely be considered sub-optimal, today. I am concerned that less-well-known corners of Stack Overflow should not become fossils of "how things were done towards the start of the 21st century."
    – Rounin
    Jun 17 '20 at 23:01
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    Well, as you can see by the feedback(lash) about the "thanks🙏" feature SO are clearly in a mood for putting extra buttons on posts. I already made some joking comment there about when we're going to get a button to mark posts as old/obsolete but maybe it has merit. Perhaps you may feel that the accumulated upvotes of an old post will not be surpassed by upvotes on a newer technique and instead another way of marking a technique as old would be handy
    – Caius Jard
    Jun 18 '20 at 5:48
  • That's certainly one option, @CaiusJard. Another option is giving upvotes a half-life so that they decay over time. That is, an answer with 800 upvotes in 2010 (and which never gets upvoted again) will have 400 upvotes in 2020 and 200 upvotes in 2030.
    – Rounin
    Jun 18 '20 at 8:15
  • I am not really in favor of decaying points over time (even if it does not have impact on the rep) While some answers do decay, some don't. Imagine worse situation - for some less frequent tags where answers don't attract significant amount of upvotes. You can have great answer posted 10 years ago that decayed to 0 and horrible answer posted yesterday with sock puppet upvote. Jun 18 '20 at 9:32
  • I think that posting new answer and then trying to bring attention to it in some other way is better, also if the top answers are really wrong (not covering new development) comment will suffice. Jun 18 '20 at 9:34
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    @DalijaPrasnikar nothing wrong with showing the user of a graph of the vote decay, then.. If the complaint is that "in this instant the great answer seems 0 and the terrible one is 1" - but great answers that are being continually referenced would have upvotes that counteract the halflife?! Actually, even just seeing a graph might indicate answer relevant; were most of its upvotes at the beginning (steep then plateau) or does it climb steadily (contant angle) becauise its constantly useful, or has a rash of sockpuppets banged in all the votes in the past week (flat flat whoosh)?
    – Caius Jard
    Jun 18 '20 at 17:31
  • In frequent tags decaying may be less of a problem, in those not so frequent there are sometimes very hard problems with great answers that only concern handful of users. Decaying on such answers would be wrong. Jun 18 '20 at 18:31
  • But that's the idea behind the graph..
    – Caius Jard
    Jun 18 '20 at 18:48
  • How many users will be able to see the graph? Users below 1000 cannot even see upvote/downvote count Jun 18 '20 at 19:09
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    Re "the voting system will start driving the end result you seek": Yes, but it may take a very long time. Jun 20 '20 at 10:44
  • @PeterMortensen I agree; I merely commented on the state of affairs, flawed as it may be. There should be a good way to speed it up - everyone head over to my "let's have some more useful reactions" question and vote for cobwebs!
    – Caius Jard
    Jun 20 '20 at 11:21
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    I did add a bounty to the question, but it looks like my 2020 answer will still need another 149 upvotes before it reaches second place. If I remember to do so, I'll go back and look at the question in 2025 and see how it's getting on against the answers from 2011.
    – Rounin
    Jun 22 '20 at 20:50

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