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In a similar fashion to suggested edits (though not by creating yet another queue), this proposal allows users with less than 50 reputation to post comments that aren't visible to anyone except high-rep1 users and the person who posted them. High-rep users are provided with two options: "Approve" or "Delete." 2

"Approve" would surface the comment as if the user had posted it with 50 rep. "Delete" would do the obvious. I envision it more or less as a dimmed-out comment with a checkbox and an X next to it.


1For some definition of "high-rep," TBD.

2The exact form that this would take I leave as an exercise for the reader.

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  • 11
    No thanks. Why would we ever want this? Why would we want more things to review? The whole point of preventing new users from posting comments is to emphasize that Stack Overflow is not a discussion forum and drive them towards posting an actual answer.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 4, 2020 at 22:19
  • 1
    It's not a review queue, at least not in the same way that the broken review queues system works. I envision it more or less as a dimmed-out comment with a checkbox and an X next to it. Very simple.
    – anon
    Jun 4, 2020 at 22:24
  • 2
    And actually that's not why people need 50 rep to post comments. If it were, that maneuver would actually work in the way you described.
    – anon
    Jun 4, 2020 at 22:24
  • 5
    It does work exactly like that. As we both well know, not everyone gets the message, and some users still end up posting comments as if they were answers, but it's a lot fewer than if we were to just open up the floodgates and let anyone who wants, unfamiliar as they are with how this site works, post anything they want. I really don't want to clean up that slog, and even if you argue that there are folks who would be willing, all of that mess would get in the way of the real content. That is the real reason we rep-limit comments. Do you have a different reason in mind?
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 4, 2020 at 22:37
  • 1
    Arbitrary deletion of comments is another reason I seldom participate here.
    – anon
    Jun 4, 2020 at 22:58
  • 2
    I don't like this at all. Why should one user decide that my comment is worthless just because I'm at 49 reputation points? When I can just post an answer and get my comment privilege? I imagine the good comments would be so rare that they'd be accidentally removed more often than not anyway.
    – Scratte
    Jun 4, 2020 at 23:00
  • 3
    Robert, after your reply, I realized that my inclusion of the "edit" link at the end of my last comment (which I did as a matter of habit and because it's so easy to add) could be perceived as a slap in the face to someone with your experience here, so I removed that part of my comment. Since it had led to a lengthy discussion (8 comments and counting), and all of those comments were obsolete (since I fixed what led to them), I deleted them. This is not "arbitrary deletion", and your calling me "bad-tempered" because I disagree(d) with you is not appreciated.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 4, 2020 at 23:01
  • 1
    The problems started with "No thanks." Regretfully, I probably participated in this sort of tone back in the day, but it's a bad look coming from moderators, and it needs to stop.
    – anon
    Jun 4, 2020 at 23:02
  • I think this answer to "Feature request on commenting vs editing with a reputation value under 50" may be related.
    – Scratte
    Jun 4, 2020 at 23:08
  • 1
    I'm trying to understand here... It's a bad look for moderators to disagree with suggestions? It's not as if I didn't give reasons, nor did I immediately slap a [status-declined] tag on this. Moderators need to be able to participate as community members, too, and that includes disagreeing with feature requests or other proposals to change the site. What would you have had me to do? Say nothing because I happen to have a diamond next to my name? Is there something wrong with the tone of "no thanks"? It is intended to thank you for the suggestion, but say I don't want it anyway.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 4, 2020 at 23:08
  • @Scratte: I posted this as a response to that question. I think it's the question the OP was really trying to ask. Unfortunately the former question sort of suffocated under its own weight.
    – anon
    Jun 4, 2020 at 23:12
  • 1
    @Scratte: And Shog's answer below (and Cody's comments above) reminded me that the comment system is so vilified that there's virtually no hope of it being redeemed. Joel Spolsky had the right idea; we should just let all comments expire after 7 days.
    – anon
    Jun 4, 2020 at 23:16
  • 2
    Not sure about that being in the best interest of everyone. Since harmful or very wrong answers are sometimes heavily upvoted, the only thing one can do to try to mitigate that is: Comment.
    – Scratte
    Jun 4, 2020 at 23:18
  • 1
    @CodyGray: Food for thought: now that there's a moderator council, moderators are effectively arbiters. They are now the gatekeepers for those community ideas that make it to corporate. Logically, such arbiters would hold off on passing judgement until the larger community weighs in. That is, if they still claim to represent the communities they moderate.
    – anon
    Jun 4, 2020 at 23:25
  • @RobertHarvey This is the kind of thing that I was thinking of in the post that Scratte mentions. I was suggesting (if that is the right word) the possibility of something a little larger, but it doesn't need to be, and it could grow to something more in the future if desired.
    – Shaggie
    Jun 4, 2020 at 23:45

2 Answers 2

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This might work, but... Gosh, it'd be a nasty slog. Ever handled comments on a moderately-popular blog? Sooooooo much spam and vile nonsense. I'd feel bad for anyone who dared to venture into such a queue.

Of course, the same could be said for answers - but, answers have various checks to slow abuse: rate-limits, spam- and abuse-prevention systems, even little checks to thwart automated posts. Comments have none of those things.

So, this isn't all that bad of an idea if there were better systems in place for automatically discouraging lousy comments. Or, y'know, any systems in place for that. I'm particularly partial to the idea of adaptive rate-limits... But, realistically, this is something that would require defense in depth - multiple overlapping systems working together.

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  • Let unapproved comments expire after a day or two.
    – anon
    Jun 4, 2020 at 22:33
  • 2
    Eh; this isn't worth doing at all unless it actually works to let new folks post comments. If someone tries to post a comment asking for clarification and no one ever sees it because it's buried under a mountain of spam, then we'd be better off just telling folks to post answers.
    – Shog9
    Jun 4, 2020 at 22:34
  • Well, maybe I haven't described this well, but it should be as frictionless as possible. My assumptions are (possibly incorrect): 1. the number of sub 50 rep users who want to post comments is quite small relative to the total number of comments, and 2. Any high-rep user can swat these comments with a single inline vote, as they appear.
    – anon
    Jun 4, 2020 at 22:37
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    It could certainly be tested, @Robert - but I'd want someone standing by with a big ol' "OFF" switch at all times.
    – Shog9
    Jun 4, 2020 at 22:37
  • I think the idea of limits or rate-limits is a good one. Those users should not have the need to post comments at a high rate, and I think they could understand that because they have a low rep, they cannot contribute as often.
    – Shaggie
    Jun 4, 2020 at 23:51
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    The point, @Shaggie, is that we want new users to stop (or never start) thinking of comments as a contribution. Allowing them to post comments, regardless of the behind-the-scenes mechanisms, would subvert that primary goal.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jun 5, 2020 at 0:00
  • @CodyGray: Hello. I guess one difference in thought is what truly is a "new user". Is that someone with a low rep, or someone that has recently started accessing Stack Overflow. I do understand what you are saying, but I still feel that comments, as long as they don't disappear, are still contributions, albeit minor ones that earn no reputation. Allowing people that don't abuse it to contribute in this way at least allows for more of a feeling of participation. I feel that it could encourage them to participate in more meaningful ways in the future.
    – Shaggie
    Jun 5, 2020 at 0:13
  • This is one reason I suggested that this ability could be denied from those that abuse it, but I understand that this could add more overhead than is desired at this time.
    – Shaggie
    Jun 5, 2020 at 0:14
  • Everything for another Steward badge ...
    – rene
    Jun 5, 2020 at 6:31
3

I can only agree to this if:

  1. I'm compensated to read abusive or vulgar comments.
  2. I'm compensated to read abusive or vulgar comments on company hardware or company time.

Otherwise...do we really have to do this? Wouldn't just heavily limiting comments curb this kind of crap up front?

3
  • What stops users from posting abusive or vulgar "answers" that are not answers? If there is a automated system in place for that, I would think that it would make sense that it be applied to comments as well.
    – Shaggie
    Jun 4, 2020 at 23:54
  • @Shaggie: The usual response to that question is that answers have more safeguards in place. They participate in the queues, are editable, and can down-voted and delete-voted. Comments have none of these things.
    – anon
    Jun 4, 2020 at 23:59
  • @RobertHarvey: That makes sense. Actually, I think I just read that elsewhere. The only question I would ask is "Isn't this already a problem sometimes with comments now anyway?" I would suggest that more safeguards be put in place for comments, but that is an idea for another post.
    – Shaggie
    Jun 5, 2020 at 0:06

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