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I really don't know about you people. Sometimes when I upvote, I upvote an answer for the sake of that I have read/seen the answer as well as to show my appreciation since they've spent their time. I persist this behavior on other social platforms. I see comments and I click upvotes to let them know that I've seen/read it.

This idea has come to my mind when I was checking one of my questions. I've got my answer but there was another person, saying that I can't yet do the thing but there's another way to solve it. Since I've seen/read the answer, and appreciated it, I've upvoted but he doesn't know it.

I could also comment a simple "Thank you." but, firstly, it doesn't fit the minimum length of a comment (which I could bypass by rephrasing it) and, secondly, it is discussed that it is not what comments are made for.

So, instead of relying on hardcoded and rephrased "Thank you." comment, I think this platform needs to inform (i) either the person who has answered with a notification or an indicator on answer (both has its advantages and pitfalls) or (ii) the page visitor with an indicator on answer that OP has upvoted the question

Drawbacks

One drawback I can come up with is that informing the person who has answered or the page visitors that the OP has not upvoted the answer yet might lead to an opinion that OP has not appreciated the answer.

(read it with 3kliksphilip voice) And what is appreciation anyway? For instance, if I get an answer to my years-old question of which I do not use the same technology yet alone have access to the same codebase, should I really appreciate it with giving my upvote, knowing that I'm not in that circle but think it might help someone else? Or leave it? I do not really know. I'll let you guys discuss it.

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    Why does it matter whether the OP specifically appreciated it? If the answer gets upvoted, that still means somebody thinks it's useful. – John Montgomery May 21 at 22:56
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    First of all we have a way to accept an answer. This shows the world that OP found an answer helpful. 2. Do not just upvote a post, because you have read it, this is not how content rating works. 3. Upvotes are not really meant to appreciate someone's effort. They are meant to tell others which content is useful and which is not. – Dharman May 21 at 23:00
  • @JohnMontgomery Isn't the answer mainly targeted to OP, to solve his/her issue? Especially when the question is still young, I think it matters to show OP has seen it. – Erdin Eray May 21 at 23:04
  • @Dharman Okay, let's change it to I've read it && useful && effortful && does not answer my question but shows an alternative way to solve it. In this case, and as I've told in the comment above, it matters when the question is fresh. Please do not narrow it down to "having read = upvoting". – Erdin Eray May 21 at 23:07
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    @ErdinEray Ideally, the point of answering a question is to help not only the OP but also any future readers with the same problem. The OP can already accept an answer to show that their problem was solved; beyond that I don't think there needs to be a distinction. – John Montgomery May 21 at 23:11
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    Personally I do not care if OP has seen my answer or not. I answer because the problem asked in the question was good and I think that sharing an answer with the world will make for better software developers. For all I care OP can downvote my post. If someone upvotes me I don't need to know who it was. If OP says "Thank you" in the comments I immediately flag as No longer needed. – Dharman May 21 at 23:12
  • Guess you guys are right. Maybe we do not need this. Idk, I'm kind of between at this point. Let me think again about it. – Erdin Eray May 21 at 23:14
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    "other social platforms" People use the site, but it is not a "social platform", it is a repository of useful questions & answers. help center – philipxy May 21 at 23:58
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    "I upvote an answer for the sake of that I have read/seen the answer" - I always appreciate trolls that do things openly... I can't bring myself to upvote posts for "this is extremely bad idea. Thanks for your effort"... but find it interesting that many people consider upvote for effort as good thing for future visitors... (73% of this comment is serious) – Alexei Levenkov May 22 at 1:39
  • “Thank You” commentary should never be submitted. – Security Hound May 22 at 20:26
  • It seems a "Thank you." button has been added to answers and it covers this thread. – Erdin Eray Jun 21 at 16:55
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Sometimes when I upvote, I upvote an answer for the sake of that I have read/seen the answer as well as to show my appreciation since they've spent their time. I persist this behavior on other social platforms. I see comments and I click upvotes to let them know that I've seen/read it.

This is not how you should be voting on Stack Overflow. This is not a social media site. Votes don't mean "thanks", and they certainly aren't meant to be a simple acknowledgement. Rather, an upvote is a signal that a post is clear, relevant, useful, and correct. A downvote is a signal of the opposite: that one or more of those things are not true.

Votes provide such a signal not only to the original poster of the answer (as a feedback mechanism), but even more importantly, they provide this signal to future viewers.

I assume you're thankful for every answer that you receive to one of your questions—I certainly am. I'm even thankful for the people who took the time to read it, even if they didn't know or didn't have time to post an answer. But that definitely doesn't imply that all of those answers are useful, much less correct. If I upvote every answer that I get in a misguided attempt to say "thank you" or express general appreciation, I am doing everyone else who ever comes across that Q&A a major disservice. In particular, I would be giving them the misguided impression that I found the answer(s) to be clear, relevant, useful, and correct, and they may end up wasting their time on answers that aren't going to help them.

I've upvoted but he doesn't know it.

That's correct. Nobody should ever know how anyone else voted, whether up or down. Votes are anonymous, and there are very good reasons to maintain that.

I could also comment a simple "Thank you." but, firstly, it doesn't fit the minimum length of a comment (which I could bypass by rephrasing it) and, secondly, it is discussed that it is not what comments are made for.

That's correct: "thank you" comments are considered to be "noise" here, and they are not welcome. Please do not leave them. If you do, it will just waste moderators' time having to delete them.

I think this platform needs to inform (i) either the person who has answered with a notification or an indicator on answer (both has its advantages and pitfalls) or (ii) the page visitor with an indicator on answer that OP has upvoted the question

No, this is unnecessary. Simply put, how you voted does not matter. To anyone. Not to the answerer, and not to future viewers.

This site is not a help desk. That you, as the asker, saw and/or found the answer to be useful is almost completely irrelevant (though a nice bonus). Hundreds of other people can and do find the Q&A via search engines, and their assessment is just as valuable—if not more so—as the person who originally asked the question. When one answers a question, it isn't merely to help the person who originally asked the question. It's to help everyone else who ever searches for answers to similar question in the future.

As an answerer, I do not care whether the person who originally asked the question saw my answer, I do not care whether they upvoted it, and I should not care about either of these things. You should not care that I do not care.

The one and only feature that we have to indicate how the original asker of the question feels about the answers is the acceptance mark—the green checkmark that you can click in the left gutter next to an answer. This is meant as a special signal that you, the asker, found this specific answer to be the most helpful in solving your problem. You can give out the acceptance checkmark however you see fit, or not assign it at all.

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