34

I was answering a question which used variable names in a foreign language, maybe Dutch.

In my answer I suggested to use English variable names, because I found it rather difficult to figure out what OP wanted to achieve. If they were Chinese, Russion or Greek characters, I could probably not have helped at all.

Now, a user pointed out in a comment that this is considered rude and abusive.

Comment section for reference

If that's really the case, I'd like to change my way of writing - or maybe remove myself from this site, because it will be more and more difficult to contribute on this site, if everyone writes in his native tongue.

Which guideline am I violating?

Edit: Since @ChrisF♦ removed the affected sentence, it seems that I should really not suggest English in code.

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  • 27
    I would flag that comment as rude and move on ... – Temani Afif May 16 at 19:40
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    Just as a note - I edited out that last sentence to prevent your answer getting (more) rude/abusive flags. I'm not going to comment further at this stage. – ChrisF May 16 at 19:41
  • 32
    IMHO it's a valid suggestion, and you've included it in the correct place (right at the end of your answer, and merely as a helpful suggestion). Calling it bigoted is more rude than making the suggestion itself. – Nick May 16 at 19:42
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    It's not rude or abusive to suggest that, when asking for help on an English-only site, part of creating a MRE should be translating identifiers to English to help readers understand the logic they're supposed to be helping with. Is PEP-8 rude and abusive for suggesting that comments should be in English when sharing code? – jonrsharpe May 16 at 19:47
  • 18
    Also while we're here, can someone explain what "Please remove yourself" means besides coming across as someone saying "GTFO" while trying to be polite and failing miserably? – Nick May 16 at 19:48
  • 15
    I just need to point out that while suggesting it on its own isn't rude, it really depends on how it's presented. Similarly to telling people to google stuff, it's all about doing it properly and in a way that isn't rude. You didn't say anything crossing a line here, in my opinion. The comment from TheLazyScripter, however, does cross a line. And suggesting english variable/function names when asking on Stack is actually something I can get behind. It's a lot easier to help when you're able to understand what the various names mean, and it's more likely for OP to get help. – Zoe May 16 at 19:56
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    Also, while we're on the topic of language, all questions on SO (stackoverflow.com and meta.stackoverflow.com; NOT the other language variants like ru.stackoverflow.com) are in English. Entirely non-english posts can be closed as "unclear" (... or whatever is the consensus with these new close reasons. I'm out of the loop on that, ngl). Variable, function, and other construct names are a bit of an exception to that. – Zoe May 16 at 19:58
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    @Nick: Maybe it just means "Please remove that text that I am referring to, yourself". I hope he didn't mean "kill yourself". My primary language is not English. These things are really difficult for me. For me, the interpretation spectrum is large. – Thomas Weller May 16 at 19:58
  • 5
    I don't think this belongs in an answer to be honest. Unless it really is part of the answer. Apart from that I'd refrain from suggesting such though, even in comments. It's just variable names for what I imagine is a small program or a snippet. – Scratte May 16 at 20:03
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    @Scratte Did you look at the question, I have no idea what each variable is meant to be, and I'm not going to make effort to figure it out when OP won't make effort to provide meaningful variable names in the appropriate language... I wouldn't DV, but I wouldn't make an effort – Nick May 16 at 20:03
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    If you want to be on the safe side you could rephrase to something like I hope I got the variable names correctly interpreted and assume the right functional meaning for them when I translated those to English. That sentence is free of opinion, leaves the blame for getting it wrong at your end and has more then enough hints for a reasonable OP to understand that they made the task harder for you. Most Dutch folks will "get" the message and their next MCVE will probably have english variable names. – rene May 16 at 20:14
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    It's also fine to use comments for clarification. "Does variable [blah] mean height?" or even "I don't know Dutch and it's unclear what your variables are for, can you explain?" would work. But I agree with Scratte that suggestions for how to write the question don't belong in answer posts. – BSMP May 16 at 23:20
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    Side note: @ThomasWeller you probably should have flagged the comment as "rude" and not reply to it. – Alexei Levenkov May 16 at 23:41
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    @ChrisF Just a heads up, "practicing" is the AmE spelling of "practising", as right as we think we are, we shouldn't be enforcing our BrE standards on others :p – Nick May 17 at 5:02
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    Although I'm no longer active on SO (for exactly that reason) : There is a strong tendency to consider someone as "rude and abusive" whenever someone says that this person is "rude and abusive", because ... feelings ... and feelings don't lie. I'm watching the boat sink, and read de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Der_Zauberlehrling when I'm bored. – Marco13 May 18 at 1:56
24

No. You are not rude or abusive.

Different people people speaking different languages is a problem. This is a fact of life. In order to answer questions, we must be able to understand them. Different languages get in the way.

If someone writes code that is difficult to understand because the variable names (or comments) are not in English then this is a problem:

  • for us, because we can't give meaningful answers
  • for the OP, because the OP won't get meaningful answers
  • for future readers.

It can be particularly problematic when the code doesn't actually make sense and you need to understand what the OP is trying to do. This is often the case for "beginner" problems where the OP's code is nonsensical and their descriptions are incoherent. (Not in >>this<< example though, IMO!)

One approach is to suggest (politely!) that they translate their variable names, etc. Though it probably doesn't belong in an Answer. I would be inclined to comment on the Question something like this:

"I am afraid that I don't understand what this code is trying to do. It may help us to understand your problem if you translated the variable names and comments into English."

Another approach is to (politely!) qualify your Answer; e.g.

"I am not sure I fully understand your code, but ..."

and then proceed to answer based on what you understood despite the variable names.

Another approach is to just vote-to-close as "unclear what you are asking" and move on. This assumes that variable translation is really necessary. As @Scratte comments, non-English variable names are not a prima facie reason to close a question. The vote-to-close privilege should be exercised responsibly.

The final approach is to just ignore the Question entirely.


Note that this is not a code style issue1. It is a communication issue. We are not suggesting that the OP change how they write code for their own purposes. We are only concerned about the code that they ask for our help on.

  • We need to understand the code it to answer the Question.
  • Future readers often need to understand the code so that they can figure out if the Question matches their problem.

Which leads me to a final point. I think that we should only be suggesting that the OP translates variable names and comments if it is necessary to make the Question understandable to you. If you can work it out (or could work it out if you put in a bit of effort) don't suggest.

I don't speak Dutch, but I think I can work out what nearly all of the variable names mean from the code and the context. So in this case, I would not see the need to comment. But I only speak for myself.


1 - And commenting on style is not necessarily off-topic anyway. It depends on the programming language and whether it has strong / widely accepted style conventions.

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  • I can't find it at the moment, but I'm pretty sure there's a post here on meta mentioning that variable names not in English is not a reason to close. But you have a point when the code is too difficult to understand. There are some hints that even confusing names are OK though: Using confusing variable names in questions – Scratte May 17 at 6:33
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    @Scratte - I agree. Variable names not in English is not a reason to close. But a Question being incomprehensible when among other things the variables are not in English is a good reason. – Stephen C May 17 at 6:42
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    But it doesn't belong in an answer. Meta information (about a post) belongs in comments (to the question in this particular case). – Peter Mortensen May 17 at 19:14
-5

If they were Chinese, Russion or Greek characters, I could probably not have helped at all.

I don't think this is completely true. Variable names are just identifiers, they can be in any language or none at all and as such don't change how the code works. Of course, descriptive, short variable names are better than arbitrary or overly long names, helping to understand code. Since English is the most widely used language it makes sense to actually use meaningful English variable names (at least when asking on Stack Overflow).

You or the question creator or someone else could have improved the question and renamed variables, but this could in itself introduce additional errors and often it's not so easy to decide how a variable should be named best. Opinions on that probably differ.

In this concrete example:

klaar = False
while klaar != True:
    product = int(input("type a product code or press 0 to close: "))
    if product in kera:
        alijst[product] = kera[product]
    else:
        if product == 0:
            klaar = True

The name klaar looks as good to me as the translations to English (ready for what?), alijst is also only marginally less helpful than alist (which is a dictionary, not a list).

I would give the question asker a bit of slack regarding the naming of variables in code examples, but I can of course use meaningful English variable names in code examples in my answer. I could even after posting an answer polish the question and improve variable names there.

A possible renaming of variables in the question is to me more of a meta thing and should rather be a comment to the question than part of an answer (something like "I have difficulties understanding your code, please consider translating used variable's names to English to help me and others understand the problem better.").

Finally, the question really isn't a great one. The code is not minimal and the problem is not stated clearly (How exactly are prizes supposed to be added together? Where are the prizes stored?). If these weren't the case, the variable names might be less of a problem if at all.

Summary: Your comment in the answer was not rude or abusive but at the wrong place and in this case maybe not necessary. The comment calling you out, however, was rude and abusive. It's really good that it's gone.

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-15

Such coding style suggestions do not belong to an answer and may be done as a post-specific comment. Such suggestion as part of answer is not considered rude but rather unnecessary.

Suggested alternatives:

  • phrase the same idea as remark to your answer as rene suggested

    "I hope I got the variable names correctly interpreted and assume the right functional meaning for them when I translated those to English."

  • comment on the post for a specific unclear issue as BSMP suggested

    "Does variable [blah] mean height?" or even "I don't know Dutch and it's unclear what your variables are for, can you explain?"

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  • 11
    I disagree that stylistic suggestions do not belong in an answers. In my answer, I can make any suggestions that I want to improve the code, whether that is longer or shorter variable names, English or non-English variable names, more or less indentation, purple or green backgrounds in your IDE, etc. – Cody Gray May 17 at 0:39
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    @CodyGray idk.... suggesting a green background in my IDE might offend me a fair bit.... purple I can maybe get behind – Nick May 17 at 1:19

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