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The "no improvement whatsoever" and associated description:

This edit does not make the post even a little bit easier to read, easier to find, more accurate or more accessible. Changes are either completely superfluous or actively harm readability.

seems a little over the top.

Every time I have to select this answer, I feel rude/dramatic. The description seems to imply that the editor was too dumb to improve the post even a little bit or that their intent was actually malicious. Both reasons seem too intense for an action, that in reality, was likely just to offer some help.

Instead, it could be changed to "no improvement" with an associated description of:

This edit does not improve the post. Changes do not help the post or harm readability.

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    In my opinion you are right. It is a very confusing reason. Using of this option make a very toxic and confuse reasoning. It definitely should be split into more different options and need serious upgrade. – armagedescu May 11 at 10:34
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    I don't like the word "objectively". As long as users rate the usefulness of an edit, the rating is basically subjective. How about replacing "objectively" with "sufficiently"? – honk May 11 at 11:39
  • Removing the word "whatsoever," as suggested, would seem to be in line with being polite and promoting civility within the community. – BalooRM May 11 at 11:45
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    Could we say "Changes are either cosmetic or does not improve readability" or something similar? – ivarni May 11 at 12:19
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    I'd just remove the adverb altogether and make the adjective less high falutin': "This edit does not improve the post. Changes do not help the post or harm readability." – Heretic Monkey May 11 at 12:20
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    I generally agree with this but I wonder if something like "or does not raise the post to an acceptable standard" could be tacked on the end? I seem to see no end of pointless edits to questions that are either totally off-topic or beyond repair by anyone but the OP. – PeterJ May 11 at 13:51
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    See meta.stackexchange.com/a/242160/188189 for the thinking behind why it is as it is. – Robert Longson May 11 at 14:18
  • @PeterJ: exactly. A very badly stated, incomplete, or off-topic post that gets edited to remove some spelling errors and any variation of 'thank[s] in a[d]vance[d]' is IMO not a good edit. – Jongware May 11 at 14:30
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    The brackets I have added into the sentence "Changes do not (help the post or harm readability)" show how it can be misinterpreted. I agree with the sentiment of this question but believe that this sentence can be improved. – AdrianHHH May 11 at 18:28
15

I wouldn't mind a rewrite, but I'd rather see it better discourage future edits in the same vein

does not help post quality
Edits should be avoided if they are only fixing minor problems or ignoring post quality. The post can either stand as-is, or it needs a more significant edit

That avoids being confrontational, while explaining what we're trying to avoid by selecting that reason. As to your comment

Every time I have to select this answer, I feel rude/dramatic. The description seems to imply that the editor was too dumb to improve the post even a little bit or that their intent was actually malicious. Both reasons seem too intense for an action, that in reality, was likely just to offer some help.

Not all attempts at help are actually helpful. In curation circles we revile the "polishing turds" edits. If a question was closed for lacking a minimal reproducible example, a simple edit making grammatical fixes isn't useful. In fact, it's actually the opposite, because now you're throwing the edited question into the reopen queue. As such, the edit not only failed to fix the problem, it made more work needlessly. I've seen people edit spam to be "helpful" instead of flagging it. We need correction there. That was the original goal

Sadly, [hostile action is] sometimes necessary - for whatever reason, folks submit edits that are pointless, or worse... But if you don't think the edit you're looking at matches that description, then either don't reject it, or use a different reason.

If it does fall into that bucket, then let's call a spade a spade: being "nice" does not mean obscuring your intent when you must chide someone; that doesn't benefit anyone.

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    only fixing minor problems - I feel like there's going to be push back on this part specifically because they already got rid of the "Too Minor" rejection reason. I suspect the "even a little bit" part of the current text is directed at both the editor and the reviewers. – BSMP May 11 at 18:43
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    "This edit does not significantly improve the quality of the post. Edits are expected to be substantial and to leave the post better than you found it." – Cody Gray May 11 at 20:26
  • @BSMP I tried to leave it as broad as possible, but "minor" is really one of the best words to describe it. We don't want someone playing grammar police, when we're just fixing inconsequential punctuation, while we do want typos fixed. – Machavity May 11 at 21:05
  • Sure, I just remember that argument coming up before in a previous discussion of the wording for No Improvement. – BSMP May 11 at 21:20
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    In my opinion, it isn't a matter of how major or minor the edit is. It's more a matter of how many other problems there are with the post that were unaddressed by the edit. If the post is nearly perfect, then an edit fixing punctuation may be a valid edit. If the post is full of typos, formatting errors, etc., then changing a period to a question mark is not a useful edit. – Cody Gray May 11 at 21:41
  • Pardon my edit--I was confused by what belonged in blockquotes and what didn't (I'm actually still confused by it but not sure how to fix). – ggorlen May 14 at 19:47
  • "fixing minor problems" is fixing problems. We don't want to discourage this. Fixing non-problems is what should be discouraged by this. – Braiam May 16 at 19:25
  • @CodyGray for those cases, reject and edit is the option to use. Not just reject. – Braiam May 16 at 19:26

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