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I found a very cool repository: https://github.com/n64decomp/sm64

I was not able to get it to run from source. I was wondering if Stack Overflow is the appropriate place to ask for general help on this regard.

Moreover, the instructions are to, kind of, build and run the project and even it is from source, it seems like kind of compile + build instructions. I also was wondering if it was possible to run the project in debug mode and if this second question would go in the same pack as the "help to run the repository" question.

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    Why not ask the developers directly via their discord link? May 11 '20 at 7:19
  • Its not working anymore. It throws a message kind of "the invitation has expired" or similar May 11 '20 at 7:20
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    No one is going to do a full "here is how you compile this thing" but if you compile it, and run into a specific problem / error, you can ask (search for) a question to have that single compile / build problem fixed. Those questions could fit on SO but be aware that if you';re new to the compiler it is expected to do a lot of self-study first. I mean, asking about C++ compile errors without having a basic understanding of that compiler is not going to fly.
    – rene
    May 11 '20 at 7:20
  • @rene Thank for your comment .So its clear for me that compilation questions fit in SO as long as they are concrete. What about my second question? if I would like to know if it is possible to run a complex to compile repo in debug mode to explore the code would also fit?. That would be a question for someone already succesfull in compiling the code or a general question, but may be not particularly bound to the repo itself, but with that repo as an example. Do you know where if not in SO? thanks in advance May 11 '20 at 8:36
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    Does this answer your question? Should a question that is meaningless without viewing an external link be closed?
    – gnat
    May 11 '20 at 10:55
  • You can't build that one for the PC, if you're asking. All the PC versions have probably been taken down by Nintendo for copyright infringement now.
    – S.S. Anne
    May 11 '20 at 22:00
  • @S.S.Anne Good warning, but you could probably still ask for how to build it (step by step) because the knowledge of it could be useful for other things as well or you could only want to build it for private purposes. Do we care if Nintendo may or may not come after something that was built with the help of Stack Overflow? I actually really wonder. Have to search for a meta question about the ethical implications of SO knowledge.
    – Trilarion
    May 12 '20 at 5:36
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Summary: You may ask on Stack Overflow, but be specific and do your (re-)search first.

Stack Overflow is for asking about specific programming problems, so asking for general help with getting code to compile might just not be specific enough.

However, since you already have a specific code in mind (the one stored in that repository) and if you encounter specific problems during an attempt to compile that code and if these problems aren't already solved elsewhere on the network, please ask about it on Stack Overflow (one problem at a time). Rene observed similar things already in a comment:

No one is going to do a full "here is how you compile this thing" but if you compile it, and run into a specific problem / error, you can ask (search for) a question to have that single compile / build problem fixed. Those questions could fit on SO but be aware that if you';re new to the compiler it is expected to do a lot of self-study first. I mean, asking about C++ compile errors without having a basic understanding of that compiler is not going to fly.

Don't ask: How do I build repository XYZ?

Ask: I want to build repository XYZ. I try A, it gives B, I expected C. How can I fix that?

The information that you want to build repository XYZ is just context here. The programming problem is the thing you encounter on the way.

The same goes for running code in debug mode. If you need help, please ask, but be specific and do your (re-)search first.

If the code is in a public place and there are contact details given, it's also always an option to try to contact the developers directly and ask them about how to get their code to run.

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  • thanks. So, finally, as far as I understand. Assumimg that compiling the repo is beyond my reach for the moment, and I am not able to expose my attempt to run it in debug mode that would be a second step, apart of the option contacting the developers directly, there is not an Stack Exchange clear suitable community to post that particular question. Is that correct? May 11 '20 at 9:41
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    No, Stack Exchange sites do not provide tutorials. They are all question-and-answer sites. That means we require specific questions that can be comprehensively answered without needing to write an entire book. If you aren't comfortable enough with the basic language or tooling to write a specific question about a problem you're having compiling the repo, then you need to go look for a tutorial (book, website, online course, etc.) first. @Rusty
    – Cody Gray Mod
    May 11 '20 at 9:44
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    @RustyBucketBay "...there is not an Stack Exchange clear suitable community to post that particular question." To my knowledge there is no StackExchange community that will give a general guide to compile code. Stack Overflow is already your best bet, but only works for specific programming questions. You said: "I was not able to get it to run from source", so maybe you already got stuck at one specific point? If its a general lack of knowledge about how to compile code, then searching for tutorials is part of the (re-)search.
    – Trilarion
    May 11 '20 at 9:56
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    Thanks for your comments.I am aware that SO is not a tutorial site, and also that the StackExchange community wont provide mi a general guide compile code. I thankfully granted that to @rene in his comment from the beginning. However this second question would be a question in between general and concrete. For example, can be a repo compiled with this tools X, Y and Z as in this repo <githubUrl> be run in debug mode?. But apparently, that might not be concrete enough as it seems, which I understand, because at some point question generality must be bounded. So its clear. Thank y'all May 11 '20 at 10:12
  • Just some last comments, for me a question of this kind would make sense because it is kind of yes,no, do not know, answerable by people with more expertise for a concrete scenario. For me its concrete enough and relevant because it can encourage/dissuade you to move on with a research or certain task to know if something of some concrete scenario is in principle considered possible or not by more expert people than you in an unexplored field for the question maker. May 11 '20 at 10:34
  • From my humble point of view, it would suit the philosophy of help supply by the community without expecting from the community to do your work and maintain the content relevant philosophy that I understand from SO and StackExchange community in general May 11 '20 at 10:34
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    @RustyBucketBay "it is kind of yes,no, do not know, answerable by people" I'm not so sure. The answer may be "it depends". On the other hand yes/no answerable questions are much less interesting than how to question in my personal view. How to teaches you skills, yes/no just gives you a tiny bit of information. Knowledge is more like knowing why something is or isn't the case or how to do things then simply knowing if something is or isn't the case. Believe me, you do not only want to know if it's possible to run a project in debug mode (most probably yes), but also how or if not, why not.
    – Trilarion
    May 11 '20 at 11:57
  • @RustyBucketBay Just one more thought: If you want to know if something can be done, then without knowing how to do it actually, you're not really better of, or are you? So whenever you want to know if something can be done (outside the context of theoretical considerations) you can just ask how to do it and if you get a result that also answers the if question. That's at least the case for practical knowledge. You want to apply it, so knowing about the existence of a solution doesn't help too much.
    – Trilarion
    May 11 '20 at 12:10
  • I see your points and its true, Its not usually as simple as yes or no, and it might require the answerer to dig into the problem more than expected, which would make the question out of bounds. In that case I would agree. My point is that that tiny bit of information, in case it is a clear no, would be very interesting to know, and is part of the much more interesting 'how' you mention, because without that piece of info, you might waste a bunch of days/weeks trying something that is in principle considered as "not possible" or a dead end May 11 '20 at 12:19
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    Anyhow I clearly understand the threat of having too wide of an scope / offtopic questions as the one we are talking about, so of lowering the quality of the content in general. May 11 '20 at 12:19
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I’m going to put even more burden on you than Trilarion’s answer and instead suggest a list of things you can do instead of asking SO:

  • Ask the developer on any channel they provided. (You already tried this)
  • Look at bug reports/pull requests to see if the issue you are facing has a solution there. (I’m unsure if you did this)
  • Look at forks/network. This project has 522 forks and while many of them probably have no changes, according to the network graph, there are at least 5 repositories that are still active, and those maintainers/developers could have already figured out the issue and solved it.
  • Study the code. In general, we expect you have some idea what the code does or is supposed to achieve. Some of us can figure out what it’s supposed to do given enough context, but it is useful for you to do this upfront. Of course, this would make you another maintainer of the project, which as said in the previous point this project has some active forks.
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    @user4642212 "which as said in the previous point this project has some active" previous point was talking about forks. Forks have maintainers/developers. So, the answer to your question is "all of above".
    – Braiam
    May 11 '20 at 18:35

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