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I recently gained access to the Low Quality Posts (LQP) queue. Now that I've reviewed nearly 100 answers, I decided to go back and audit my reviews to make sure I am maintaining a good track record.

While the bulk of my reviews agreed with the consensus opinion, I am concerned to find a handful of my Looks OK votes don't (see Audit for details). I am raising these with the community to determine if I should be applying stricter criteria.

Note: I am not contesting these reviews. My goal here is to determine if I need to update my rubric, or if these are simply judgment calls that reasonable people will weigh differently.

Contents

  • Rubric
    • Recommend Deletion
    • Looks OK
    • Skip
  • Potential Issues
    • Answers that fail to address the question
    • Duplicate answers
  • Audit
    • Deleted by moderator
    • Deleted by review
    • Flagged for deletion by (nearly) every other reviewer
  • Sources

Rubric

To start off, I'm following a fairly deterministic rubric, so I'm assuming any flaws in my process can be identified by articulating that.

Recommend Deletion

I immediately click Recommend Deletion if the answer is:

  • Spam
  • Plagiarized content
  • Illegible (e.g., not posted in English)
  • Asking a new, related, or follow-up question
  • Bumping the question ("I have the same problem")
  • Not offering instruction beyond a link

I also click Recommend Deletion if an answer is exclusively one or more of the following:

  • Clarifying the OP's requirements
  • Responding to other answers or comments
  • Thanking another contributor

Note: If the contributor thanked someone, but then posted code from either the comments or an updated version of another answer, I click Looks OK.

Looks OK

Generally, I'm considering everything else as acceptable. Notably, this includes answers that:

  • Are code only
  • Are technically incorrect
  • Repeat other answers (without overtly plagiarizing them)
  • Misunderstand the question, or don't seem entirely relevant
  • Are cumbersome to read, but still legible

Note: Obviously, these may not be good answers. But it is my understanding that a down vote is more appropriate here. In many of these cases, I'll leave a comment providing further guidance.

Skip

Generally, I'm less likely to skip in Low Quality Posts than I am in other queues. Some exceptions:

  • The answer falls into a gray area above, and I could make an argument either way
  • I don't have the technical knowledge to differentiate between a rhetorical question and a question meant to clarify requirements

Note: I've included a list of sources I used to develop this rubric at the bottom of this post.

Potential Issues

I suspect that my disagreement with other reviewers comes from my failure to address one of the following two pieces of guidance, so it'd be useful to discuss these, and whether I'm doing it wrong:

Answers that fail to address the question

From Guidelines for reviewing low-quality posts:

[A] Answers that fail to address the question: If you evaluate the answer such, first check carefully whether there is a lack of clarity in the question that you and the answer’s author may have interpreted differently. Otherwise recommend deletion. Leave an explanatory comment in both cases.

Something I've been told elsewhere (e.g., in SOCVR, on comments on Meta) is that if an answer could be a valid answer to another question, it's not NAA. I've been maintaining that here, instead of making judgment calls on how relevant the answer is to the current question.

Duplicate answers

From Low quality, but looks salvageable - trying to pick between 'Looks Good' and 'Recommend Deletion':

[Delete] If the answer duplicates another, better answer to the same question (e.g. a link-only answer where another answer provides the same link with an explanation).

Unless it's obviously plagiarized, I've been marking these as Looks OK. Instead, I'll tend to leave a note like:

Please be sure to review other answers before contributing your own. This guidance has already been provided by the accepted answer. If your answer remains relevant, be sure to provide an explanation of why it's different from existing answers—and especially highly-voted or accepted answers.

Should I be applying a stricter criteria for these two cases?

Audit

Deleted by Moderator

The following are posts that I marked as Looks OK, but were subsequently deleted by a moderator. I acknowledge that moderators may be evaluating additional criteria, but it’s still an indication that I might be missing something:

Deleted by review

Flagged for deletion by (nearly) every other reviewer

Sources

I am basing my rubric on the following sources:

  1. Guidelines for reviewing low-quality posts
  2. Low quality, but looks salvageable - trying to pick between 'Looks Good' and 'Recommend Deletion'
  3. You're doing it wrong: A plea for sanity in the Low Quality Posts queue
  4. How do I properly use the “Not an Answer” flag?
  5. Your answer is in another castle: when is an answer not an answer?
  6. Reviewing low quality posts: when to delete
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    Don't really have time at the moment to read all of this or scrutinize your reviews. But I do want to make a couple of points. First, judging based on consensus is not necessarily sound. Many reviewers make the wrong decision on posts. Use objective criteria and your own judgment, rather than trying to follow the masses. Second, and related, you can find our semi-official guidelines for reviewing new posts here. It's targeted to First Posts and Late Answers, but those are pretty much the same as Low Quality Posts. – Cody Gray May 8 at 21:06
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    Does this answer your question? There is no shame in using "Skip" – gnat May 8 at 21:08
  • @gnat: It doesn’t seem to, no. I already skip when there's ambiguity or I'm uncertain. My concern is that I don't know what I don't know, and may be investing too much confidence into a faulty rubric. – Jeremy Caney May 8 at 21:13
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    "technically incorrect" I definitely click Recommend Deletion if the answer is outright wrong. The only exception is if the answer is very recent and the author might be working on fixing/improving it. That's just my personal opinion though. – Ahmed Abdelhameed May 8 at 21:14
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    If I'd wanted to close this as a duplicate, I could have found one. But I don't think that's productive. If someone wants specific, targeted advice on how to improve their reviewing skills, I think that's totally fair game for a Meta question, and they deserve to get some actual answers. This isn't a low-effort "How do I review?" question; that I would close as a duplicate in a heartbeat. Yes, when in doubt, always Skip. But it's OK to ask later what you should have done. – Cody Gray May 8 at 21:14
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    @AhmedAbdelhameed: According to every one of the sources I cited—two of which are official FAQs—wrong answers should not be flagged as Not An Answer or deleted as part of the Low Quality Posts queue. That guidance is both concrete and consistent, so isn’t an area I’m particularly concerned about. – Jeremy Caney May 8 at 21:22
  • @CodyGray: Thank you for the reference to the First and Late Posts FAQ. I’ve read that before but clearly needed to revisit it. It reaffirms my rubric on not deleting duplicate answers, but suggests I should be deleting irrelevant answers. I’ve updated my question to account for that guidance. – Jeremy Caney May 8 at 22:03
  • @JeremyCaney If you mean the part that says "Is fundamentally inapplicable to the question", then I'm not entirely sure that is working policy. – Scratte May 8 at 22:30
  • Update: I just rolled back my above update and instead submitted it as an answer. This should make it easier to evaluate my findings from How should I get started reviewing Late Answers and First Posts?, as per @CodyGray’s reference above. – Jeremy Caney May 8 at 22:50
  • @Scratte: I’ve quoted the sections I’m basing that on in my (new) answer below. I hope you’re right, however, because evaluating for relevance seems to open up a lot of room for ambiguity, and could easily require more domain-specific expertise than I’d otherwise expect for the Low Quality Posts review queue. I find the previous heuristic of “if it could be a valid answer to another question then it’s not NAA” easier to confidently evaluate. – Jeremy Caney May 8 at 22:57
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Your reviewing criteria are correct. This is possibly the best description of the LQP queue I have ever seen.

I only have few points to add to you "Looks OK" guidelines.
- Recommend deletion might be the right choice for code only answers when it is NATO (new answer to old question). The reason for it is that if a thread already has few upvoted answers then the new answer should add something useful. Code only answers are not very useful in general (unless it is relatively short and self-explanatory code), but when added to an old question it could simply be a "Me too" answer. Code only answers on new questions do not deserve the same treatment, because it could simply mean FGITW (fastest gun in the west) and the author posted code before adding an explanation. But... - If it is a self-answer and there is no indication that this is the solution posted by OP, then it probably should be an edit to the question.

The queue is called low quality, not very low quality. While it is easy to decide what to do with VLQ (Rec. Del.) the low quality stuff is up to your judgement. Some of us might use this queue to get rid of sub-standard answers. It is not recommended, but once again, it is your judgement. If you think this answer doesn't bring anything useful to this site then vote to delete. If you think this answer can be salvaged by someone else or that OP will come back and edit it and it's going to be educational for other users then vote "Looks OK".

To kick the post out of the review is much easier than to delete it. I really like your rubric and I believe it covers the gist of this queue, I would like to explain my train of thought when reviewing:

  1. If this post should never land in that queue in the first place and it is a really good answer then I edit. Unless it is so good that nothing needs editing, then I vote "Looks OK"
  2. Is it an answer? Does it propose a solution/workaround? If it has links and if I were to remove all these links, does it still hold true? Yeah, it's probably an answer. "Looks OK"
  3. Is it a question? Is it long dump of code with no explanation of what it is? Is it a self-answer that doesn't suggest an actual solution? Is it "I have this problem too", "Did you ever figure out...", "Thanks, it worked for me", "Here is the error. Thanks in advance", "Tengo ... Muchas gracias.", "I have made a video ...", "This article helped me ...", etc. then I vote "Recommend deletion.
  4. Is it rude or abusive or outright spam? Probably an audit, so open in a new tab. If it is not deleted yet, then flag appropriately and then Rec. Del. in LQP review.
  5. Is it something in the grey area or something I can't make mind on quickly? Skip

I don't want to comment on every review you linked, but here are some comments:

https://stackoverflow.com/review/low-quality-posts/26064079
This is a new answer to an old question that is very cheap. If you remove the niceties, then it is just one method call that does who knows what. It is not a quality answer.

https://stackoverflow.com/review/low-quality-posts/26041749
I flagged this one. This reads like a comment. If you remove the link the answer becomes very empty. It could just as well be a suggestion in the comments section and the post closed as duplicate.

https://stackoverflow.com/review/low-quality-posts/26038180
Who knows what that is. There is no explanation. Once more, it is NATO, so if I am not familiar with this technology it looks like a "me too" answer to me.

https://stackoverflow.com/review/low-quality-posts/26038402
This should have been an edit. Posted by the same user with no explanation.

https://stackoverflow.com/review/low-quality-posts/26052230
I do not know why this one is deleted. Not much was lost, it's not a top-quality answer. I would vote "Looks OK"

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    Is it possible to include a link to an image of the 5 posts for those of us that don't have the privileged to view current deleted (or future deleted) posts? – Scratte May 9 at 7:49
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After reviewing the How should I get started reviewing Late Answers and First Posts? FAQ, per @CodyGray’s guidance, I believe that the two ambiguities in my Potential Issues were based on me putting too much weight on (admittedly old) answers, instead of deferring to the official FAQs.

Answers that fail to address the question

From Low quality, but looks salvageable - trying to pick between 'Looks Good' and 'Recommend Deletion'.

Note that I don't make any attempt to determine if the solution is correct or helpful or necessarily even relevant to the question as part of this process (if I do happen to be familiar with the topic, I'll go back and vote/comment on it later though).

This is contradicted by two official FAQs, however.

In Guidelines for reviewing low-quality posts:

[A] Answers that fail to address the question: If you evaluate the answer such, first check carefully whether there is a lack of clarity in the question that you and the answer’s author may have interpreted differently. Otherwise recommend deletion. Leave an explanatory comment in both cases.

And How should I get started reviewing Late Answers and First Posts?:

Is fundamentally inapplicable to the question (a LINQ answer on a Java question or a C++ answer on a Haskell question):

Downvote. Flag as VLQ and perhaps comment.

This suggests my rubric was incorrect, and I should be evaluating for relevance.

Potential Duplicates

From Reviewing low quality posts: when to delete:

[Delete] If the answer duplicates another, better answer to the same question (e.g. a link-only answer where another answer provides the same link with an explanation).

This, however, is contradicted by the guidance in the official FAQ, How should I get started reviewing Late Answers and First Posts?:

Seems relatively trite and not particularly thorough, especially if there are a number of other answers and the question is not new:

Open the answer link in a new tab and scroll up and down from the answer position to see if a substantially earlier answer already said everything this does; if so:

Downvote; comment if practical.

In this case, it seems that my original rubric was correct, and I should not be deleting duplicate answers (but should be downvoting them).

Let me know if this sounds correct. And, obviously, I very much want to know if there are other issues I missed in my original analysis, but which are gaps in either my rubric or my selected reviews.

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    I'm think deletion applies to identical duplicates. As in full or partly copy-pasted ones. – Scratte May 8 at 23:25
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    @Scratte: I have definitely been deleting anything that looks like plagiarism. The ones I have a harder time with are cases where multiple people lob the same answer over the fence—e.g., a single line of standard code that could easily have been submitted independently. In those cases, I leave a comment reminding them to evaluate existing answers before contributing their own, but haven't been marking them for deletion. – Jeremy Caney May 8 at 23:33

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