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There is currently no indication in the usage guidance as to when which of the two tags should and should not be used, both are

wxPython is a Python wrapper for the cross-platform C++ GUI API wxWidgets.

I asked this before in the chat, but nobody could conclusively answer the question so far. So I tried to find out myself and seemingly is being used for asking issues specific to the latest wxPython release (Version 4) and to porting to it from older versions. Finally I issued the suggestion to change the usage guidance of to

wxPython Phoenix (alias wxPython 4) is a Python wrapper for the cross-platform C++ GUI API wxWidgets.

.. which is currently pending. In the long term it seems most likely that it will be a synonym to .

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Although my reply in chat was "inconclusive", let me quote my own reasoning:

[...] it would seem [that wxpython Phoenix refers to the new version of wxpython]. A rewrite of wxpython from scratch, but ultimately just a new version. In my experience we don't keep track of library versions, see e.g. django, pandas, numpy. With this reasoning the tags should be synonyms. But I don't use or know wxpython.

As for proof regarding wxpython's replacement: the old repo was renamed and archived on github, and the new Phoenix repo seems to make it clear that it is the wxpython repo that just happens to be a rewrite of the old repo.

Semantically speaking these just seem like different versions of the same library so I suggest making the tags synonyms.

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  • Does making them synonyms automatically remove the double tagging? – Wolf May 7 at 11:09
  • @Wolf yes, they would practically be the same tag. – Andras Deak May 7 at 11:33
  • I'm not sure if I worded that correctly, I mean: is a question that currently has both tags automatically losing the [wxpython-phoenix] as soon it is made as a synonym to [wxpython] or does it require manual removal? – Wolf May 7 at 11:55
  • @Wolf I believe only the synonym target tag would stay, no manual removal would be necessary. – Andras Deak May 7 at 13:40

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