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May I please know how this question (Python(Django), PHP, Ruby frameworks: How do they handle browser side scripting?) is "opinion based"?

Is there any opinion involved here when someone asks "How is browser side scripting handled by Django, Flask, Ruby on Rails, and Laravel?"

Is the answer based on people's opinion?

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    One could argue that asking if "programmers also need to know javascript and they got to embed it in pages/responses they send?" could be opinion based, but like yivi said it's going to be off-topic either way.
    – ivarni
    Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 7:17
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    I'd agree it's not opinion based but only borderline. The problem is it's a bit broad. "How does a bunch of different back-end frameworks deal with frontend" is not exactly answerable generically. Usually they don't - you write your back-end code in language X and then any front-end code in JavaScript. But then there is server-side rendering (SSR) which changes this. Some frameworks also generate (at least some) JS without you having to write it. So, whether, say, a Django or a RoR developer needs to know any JS is up in the air.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 7:17
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    If you consider the quality of the answers you managed to get before it was closed, you'll also know why questions like that aren't considered a good fit for SO.
    – ivarni
    Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 7:18
  • @VLAZ: Why it cannot be answered precisely? For example: XYZ uses javascript, ABC uses their own templates, PQR simply doesnt care about client side scripting.... There could be definitive answers like this. What is so broad in here?
    – mr.solo
    Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 8:03
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    @mr.solo it's multiple questions, that's broad. You need an answer for each technology and most likely multiple answers for each. I'm not well versed in Django or RoR, but in, say, C# you can have server-side controls that you can develop without touching JS. Then there is Razor which blends some server-side and front-end and then Blazor which...I'm not even sure what it actually does. I think it's using WebAssembly or something. So, this is three things for just one backend. There is likely more. RoR has its gems and may have other components that allow front-end logic without writing JS.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 8:25
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    @mr.solo that's also talking about largely singular "things", since Ruby on Rails is its own project, as is Django. However, then you get into PHP and it becomes messier, since there are a bunch of frameworks and libraries that can impose or prefer different ways of doing stuff. I find the "How does PHP handle front-end code" by itself to be rather broad. So your question really boils down to "How does X handle this? How does Y handle this? How does Z handle this?" and so on.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 8:30

1 Answer 1

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True, the question would probably better be closed as "too broad" instead of "opinion based". But reopening just to close again is a waste of time

At the very least, the question is too broad because there are several different technologies involved.

And there are many different "frameworks" for several of those languages (nevermind developing without using an actual framework); and different strategies for each of these frameworks.

Which to use —if any— is mostly a matter of opinion and preference, and the specifics of each project (from actual business/functional requirements to what the development team already knows an is comfortable working with).

So you have multiple questions, and each of these questions is too broad and opinionated on itself. I imagine this is what caused the close votes for "opinion-based" to be cast.

I'm sorry, but it's better if you accept that the question does not adjust to the site's guidelines, and it's not a good addition to the repository.

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    And even given the same technology/framework, what kind of website you're building will also impact how you approach browser side scripting. Some types of websites need nearly none while others need literal tons.
    – ivarni
    Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 8:39
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    "Too broad" is no longer a close reason.
    – Travis J
    Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 17:15
  • To note as well, there is no "opinion" regarding the question asked. There is a definitive answer based on reference, fact, and specific expertise.
    – Travis J
    Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 17:22
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    I'm aware of the label change, thanks. But I prefer "too broad" in many scenarios, since it's more descriptive.
    – yivi
    Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 17:24
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    @TravisJ the question whether backend developers need to know JS is opinion based. However, it's opinion based because the question itself is broad. A non-opinion and more focused question would be something about Django development (specific) and how to avoid writing JS (non-opinion). At that point you also have to dodge other potential problems like resource requests but this would be a start. Whether RoR/Django developers (non-specific, broad) need to know JS depends on both which backend and other decisions. That's not inherent to the tech stack or rather tech stack is the decision
    – VLAZ
    Commented Apr 23, 2020 at 9:27
  • @VLAZ - The question wasn't if backend developers need to know JS though; that would legitimately be opinion based. The question was how do these languages or frameworks integrate with browser scripting. Regardless of which framework it is, they all integrate the same. They either directly use JavaScript for client side scripting, use a tool to transpile to JavaScript or use a tool to transpile to WebAssembly (re: Blazor). That isn't a broad answer, I could answer that in probably 1000 characters, which is 1/30th of the space allotted. This user is just asking for a high level overview.
    – Travis J
    Commented Apr 23, 2020 at 14:58

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