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I have a burning question that, after much research, I can find no answer to. I desire to post this question on StackOverflow, but I am unsure whether it is on-topic.

My question is about JavasScript and concerns whether it is safe to assume that a user's browser has LocalStorage enabled and what to do if not. The question is not just for the current project at hand, rather it is also so that I can grow in my knowledge as a full-stack developer. Here is a preview of my question. The reason for why I give so much background is because I feel that it is necessary for a complete and thorough question, especially because people will be very curious about my use-case.

BACKGROUND: For an offline-ready collaborative big data PWA that I am designing, I need to be able to sync data between tabs so that if the user goes offline and multiple browser tabs are logged into the same account, then their data can synchronize in order to prevent user confusion/frustration and database corruption. As I am dealing with big data (data so big that loading it all into memory at once would cause serious lag or a crash), the data is being partially synced between the server and IndexedDB. For various reasons, indexedDB isn't suitable due to race conditions and Safari not supporting SharedWorkers—a panacea for this problem. So, I am using local storage to persistently synchronize between tabs for offline readiness.

Is it reasonable to assume that the majority of users accessing my website will have access to a LocalStorage capable of sustaining the concurrency necessary for my purposes, or what problems/conditions/circumstances should I know about? No, I am not asking you to post a link to the Can I Use page on LocalStorage and call it an answer. Rather, I am seeking the information that the Can I Use page does not tell you. For example, I already know that pages in sandboxed iframes are unable to access localStorage, but this particular note is not a problem for my purposes. I am also aware of the several-megabyte LocalStorage size limits, but I only store tiny data is stored in LocalStorage. Another note that I came across is that there are options in some browsers to disable LocalStorage, so I'll need to walk users through how to reenable it. What other notes should I know?

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    @Makoto Thank you for posing that link. Although the central topic of my question is the same as the topic of the question in your link–LocalStorage, the actual questions are entirely different. My question pertains moreso to the reliability of concurrent updates to LocalStorage. I have no problem at all with detecting LocalStorage support in the user's browser, which is the topic of the question in your link. – Jack Giffin Mar 9 at 3:00
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There's a lot more verbiage in this particular question and I'm really trying to cut to the core of the problem, which is why I suggested what I did in the comments.

If the core of the problem isn't detecting whether or not localStorage is available, but if it's concurrent enough to handle a specific load, you should seek to be more specific. (Side note: JavaScript is single-threaded but callbacks give the illusion of concurrency.)

Here's a stab at getting to the core of the problem.

For an offline-ready collaborative big data PWA that I am designing, I need to be able to sync data between tabs so that if the user goes offline and multiple browser tabs are logged into the same account, then their data can synchronize in order to prevent user confusion/frustration and database corruption. As I am dealing with big data (data so big that loading it all into memory at once would cause serious lag or a crash), the data is being partially synced between the server and IndexedDB. For various reasons, I'm discovering that IndexedDB isn't suitable for my purposes - due to vendor support and race conditions - and I would like start using local storage instead.

Is it reasonable to assume that the majority of users accessing my website will have access to local storage capable of sustaining the concurrency necessary to synchronize data between browser tabs?

I am aware of the several-megabyte size limits, but I would only be storing tiny data.

I realize this is a bit butchered, but what I'm trying to do is isolate the actual question you have. You should be able to take it from here and try to build something more coherent.

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  • Thank you for your suggestion, and I really like how you condensed the first paragraph nicely, but I really need all of the second paragraph, and I do not know how to condense it. My problem is not exactly limited to concurrency. For example, I was reading through the link in your comment and, although it did not answer my question, it did inform me of part of the answer to my question: there are options in the browser that disable LocalStorage. I'll need to walk users through how to reenable LocalStorage. I am wondering what other things I need to anticipate or prepare for. – Jack Giffin Mar 9 at 3:39
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    How about working from the actual problem you're trying to solve? I think you're trying to start with a solution more than a problem, and to be fair it's tough to follow. – Makoto Mar 9 at 3:46

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