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I am currently reviewing some suggested edits, when I stumbled upon this edit. The summary told that it was an accidental edit or something.

Setting back the original code. Sorry, I did not meant to change it.

Therefor I wanted to check the revision history of the post, to see what actually happened there. However I couldn't find any way to see the revision history of the post. Nor in the review Queue or on the post itself.

Is there any secret link, I can jam the post-id or similar in?

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  • There is a single edit to that post and it's that one suggestion (approved right now). You couldn't see an edit history because there wasn't one. Also I'm not sure what is it "setting back" given that it introduces changes. – VLAZ Mar 6 at 8:39
  • You can simply go to the post and view its revision history, can't you? – yivi Mar 6 at 8:40
  • @yivi not if there have been no changes to the post. That was the case at the time OP was reviewing - the suggested edit was only approved seconds after the question was posted and it was the first change to that post. – VLAZ Mar 6 at 8:41
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    Ok, you can't see previous edits if there aren't previous edits to see. – yivi Mar 6 at 8:45
  • I guess that makes sense though. I just thought that there would have been any previous edits. – Twenty Mar 6 at 8:46
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    @Twenty it would make sense. I'm actually concerned that this edit shouldn't have been made. I can't remember - can you retract suggestions after you've made them? That should have been the correct thing. One of the reviewers (I feel) correctly rejected the edit but was then overruled. – VLAZ Mar 6 at 8:50
  • @VLAZ I thought the same, but no, from what I know, you really can't retract a suggest edit. – Twenty Mar 6 at 8:53
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    I currently have a "pending edit". I've searched it with my mouse in a grid-like search pattern, just in case the option is well hidden. I cannot find any option to cancel it. Note: I wouldn't have cancelled my pending edit. I just used it to check if there was an option. – Scratte Mar 6 at 8:58
  • @Scratte that's unfortunate. You can still see the changes side to side, right? So, if you wanted, you'd be able to restore them? With that said, you'd have to modify your edit to have zero changes. I'm not sure what the system would do with that - would the whole suggestion be discarded? Would the modifications from your last suggestion be discarded? It's possible that the suggestion in this question was actually a system problem, not a user one. Not sure. – VLAZ Mar 6 at 9:04
  • @VLAZ Yes, when I click to see my "pending edit" I see the differences. I don't want to test using this one, as I believe my suggesting is sound. Note that I also do not have options to rollback any posts (except my own), while I'm a < 2K user. Maybe there is a link between those missing options. – Scratte Mar 6 at 9:08
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    @Scratte yes, I wouldn't suggest you try to "roll back" manually. I was just musing. And I don't want to test this right now with an account on one of the other sites where I don't have 2k rep, as I don't want to introduce spurious changes just for the hell of it. – VLAZ Mar 6 at 9:10
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    They may be referring to their other suggested edit, which tried to alter the accepted answer on the duplicate target: stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/25535906. Or they thought they had suggested an edit to this post then got confused over what had changed by whom. Looks like a case of confusion over what they edited. – Martijn Pieters Mar 6 at 9:34
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    And that edit should not have been approved. Off to the review ban page! – Martijn Pieters Mar 6 at 9:40
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    While the answer form @VLAZ is totally correct,for convenience you might want to take a look at Samuel Liew's Sticky Post Headers & Question Table of Contents userscript – Bill Tür Mar 6 at 10:50
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Yes, there is a "secret link". Or not that secret - all the revision links are the same but have the post ID in them:

https://stackoverflow.com/posts/45250111/revisions
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^      ^^^^^^^^
     parent site                post ID

What I find is the easiest way to find the post ID "by hand" is

  • for questions - it's in the URL already
  • for answers (and questions) - [share] under the post and copy the second to last ID (from the post in the question):
https://stackoverflow.com/a/45250111/3689450
                            ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^
                            post ID  your user ID

There are of course programmatic ways to get the ID of a post by examining the HTML. You can still use share button, for example:

const link = document.querySelector(".js-share-link").href;
const postId = link
  .split("/")    //divide by sections separated by `/`
  .slice(-2, -1) //extract second to last
  [0];           //extract from array

or various other ways, as well - this is an illustration of a programmatic way to do the same as the "manual" process.

With all that said, you can see the edit history by going to the post and clicking the timestamp of the last edit. But if there was no edit, then you wouldn't be any direct link. This is exactly what happened:

  1. Suggested edit was made at 2020-03-06 02:51:58Z.
  2. You posted this question at 2020-03-06 08:33:40Z.
  3. The edit was approved at 2020-03-06 08:37:48Z - 4 minutes after the question was posted.

This was the first and (currently) only edit made to that post, so you wouldn't have had any history to see.

Still, if you put in the "magic" URL for a post with no edits made, you would still see the history but that history would be very boring showing a single entry - the original one.

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    If using the timeline link, you get a link to https://stackoverflow.com/posts/45250111/timeline. It feels less "hacky". – Scratte Mar 6 at 9:17
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    They editor got confused as to where they had suggested edits. They also suggested stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/25535906 – Martijn Pieters Mar 6 at 9:36
  • @MartijnPieters I see! Thanks for sharing. – VLAZ Mar 6 at 9:46

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