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What does 'x packages are looking for funding' mean when running `npm install`?

According to ye olde Help Center:

if your question generally covers…

  • a specific programming problem, or
  • a software algorithm, or
  • software tools commonly used by programmers; and is
  • a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development

… then you’re in the right place to ask your question!

By my powers of deduction, that question fails to fit those criteria. It obviously misses #1 and #2; it hits #3, but fails at #4 because funding is not a problem specific to software development.

I VTC'd it, and apparently some other people did too, but it was reopened by 3 people: one of whom is the question asker (didn't know that was possible), one who edited the question to insert superfluous formatting, and one whose justification was:

enter image description here

Yeah, no, that doesn't cut it for me, but please let me know if I'm wrong.

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    Let me get this straight. Your assertion is that the question is off-topic because npm is not a "software tool commonly used by programmers"? – Cody Gray Jan 29 at 19:48
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    @CodyGray Apparently you've never read the Help Center either. Note the AND after #3. – Ian Kemp Jan 29 at 19:49
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    Okay... so, your assertion is that the question is off-topic because npm is not a "software tool commonly used by programmers" and this problem is not "unique to software development"? Because certainly there can be no argument that it is "a practical, answerable problem". – Cody Gray Jan 29 at 19:52
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    This is rules lawyering. If a tool throws a message that I don't understand, and the answer happens to be about money, not programming, how am I supposed to get an answer to my question? Case dismissed. – Robert Harvey Jan 29 at 20:02
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    "one of whom is the question asker (didn't know that was possible)" At 250 reputation you get the privilege to view and cast close and reopen votes on your own questions. – John Montgomery Jan 29 at 21:01
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    I've seen this sort of thing a lot: please don't hide answers to questions in opaque close reasons. If someone asks, essentially, "Is this CLI message something that affects the dev work I was doing when it came up?", and you happen to know that the particular message is not something relevant to dev work, share that knowledge in an answer. Don't hide it in a close vote the asker would need to know the answer to their question to understand. – user56reinstatemonica8 Jan 29 at 22:58
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Yes, it is. This question is about software tool commonly used by programmers and is a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development.

Would someone outside of software development clique encounter this message more often than coders do? I don't think so.

Same thing would apply to question like: "Why does my Windows 10 blue screen when I compile in Visual Studio?". It is a problem encountered when developing software.

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    Its a good answer except that you had to pick a blue screen as an example... regular user space software can't really trigger a blue screen, when you get one in any version of Windows of the previous decade there is something wrong with the setup at a deeper level. Driver issue, hardware issue, bug in Windows... nothing programming related, just average day computer madness. – Gimby Jan 30 at 10:03
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    While we're picking nits, @Gimby, I see one in your hair. Driver issues, hardware issues, and bugs in Windows all sound pretty programming-related to me. Those are exactly the kinds of things that I spend my typical day as a programmer dealing with. – Cody Gray Jan 31 at 17:48
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I'd like to offer some clarity about the specific verbiage in the Help Center you've cited.

if your question generally covers…

  • a specific programming problem, or
  • a software algorithm, or
  • software tools commonly used by programmers; and is
  • a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development

… then you’re in the right place to ask your question!

Firstly, you can blame me for the "and" clause between bullets 3 and 4.

I made that modification (and added several other clarifications) to the Help Center while I was still a diamond moderator. I did that while we still had oversight from Community Managers who understood how the Stack Overflow community works, and the wording has remained essentially untouched since I wrote it.

I put that wording in there to avoid "best pickles for programmers" questions. There were many, many new users who were reading these rules as permissive, not restrictive. They were justifying their vague, underspecified questions by saying things like "Hey, text editors are commonly used by programmers, so why can't I ask my question about writing a résumé in Notepad?"

That's not the case here.

While you might take exception to the lack of research inherent in the question (a situation for which a downvote is better suited), you should surely consider it unsportsmanlike to close someone's question because the answer turns out to have nothing to do with software development.

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    So really the last bullet point shouldn't be a bullet point, but rather standalone text, as all three bullet point options should be combined with "and is a practical, answerable [...]" – TylerH Jan 29 at 20:56
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    @TylerH: That's language lawyering. There's ample evidence that these kinds of point-specific changes to verbiage make no difference at all. – Robert Harvey Jan 29 at 20:57
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    I mean, all changes to the page are language lawyering... – TylerH Jan 29 at 20:58
  • @TylerH: Some changes, though, are angels dancing on the head of a pin. – Robert Harvey Jan 29 at 21:00
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    Sure, but the one in my comment would substantively change the meaning to what you apparently intended. So if you consider that 'angels dancing on the head of a pin', at least they'd be performing the right routine. – TylerH Jan 29 at 21:05

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