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On my review page, I read:

Your review on review/25144570 wasn't helpful.

"Requires Editing" should only be used when other community users (like you) are able to edit/format the question into a better shape. If a question is unsalvagable and/or can only be improved by the author, please flag/vote to close or delete instead. For more information, see meta.stackoverflow.com/q/389148.

Come back in 4 days to continue reviewing.

I feel the pain that @b-rian felt because the question was also reviewed 3x Requires Editing, so I felt slightly cheated. Let me elaborate:

  1. In my extremely limited experience with Triage questions, I click Looks OK only sometimes. If I can easily improve on the questions via editing (e.g. formatting) I will.

  2. Clicking Unsalvageable is problematic for me because with my reputation, I can only flag 11 times a day. Once I've reached that count, I can no longer click Unsalvageable.

  3. This leaves Requires editing, which over the course of my reviews have become somewhat of a "default" option (I will flag questions with Unsalvageable if the question is indeed unsalvageable, if I still can). That's because it feels like a catch-all option, even though I know the guide does not say so. Unsalvageable has usage limits, Looks OK is tricky because questions often can be improved upon.

  4. Skip. This is where I messed up. I unfortunately used Skip too little. I failed to understand that Skip should be my default option, instead of Requires editing.


Discussion time:

In my defence, the official Triage guide feels too lengthy for beginners like me to understand.

  1. Would moderators consider improving triaging guidelines for Skip so that it's more obvious that it should be the default? (For example, by putting the Skip button first, or by making it explicit in the guidelines)?
  2. Do other reviewers abuse Requires Editing? I don't feel like I am alone in this mistake.
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    "I can only flag 11 times a day. Once I've reached that count, I can no longer click Unsalvageable." - Then stop reviewing for the day when that happens? Unsalvageable review outcomes are the most useful from triage anyway – Nick Jan 21 at 10:23
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    "Requires editing" shouldn't be your default option. If you don't know what to do with it, simply hit "Skip". I see you've already said that you should be using this more often. When I look at the "Help and Improvement" queue, it is filled mostly with things that are either fine, or should have been marked as unsalvageable. Very little (at least of what I see) can be edited by anyone other than the author. – ChrisMM Jan 21 at 17:08
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    You'll get your allocation of flags increased if a bunch of your flags are marked "helpful." You can eventually get up to 100 flags a day. – EJoshuaS - Reinstate Monica Jan 22 at 13:53
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    re ' Triage guide feels too lengthy for beginners like me to understand" then learn more so that you can understand it. When you understand it then take part in the Triage queue. Don't do things you don't understand as you will mess things up for others. – user151019 Jan 22 at 15:55
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    "with my reputation, I can only flag 11 times a day." The number of flags you get isn't based on reputation, it's based on how many of your previous flags were marked helpful (minus any that were declined, disputed/aged away don't count either way). If you flag accurately and use up your allotment every day, you'll find it steadily increasing to the point where eventually you probably won't even be able to use them all in a day. – John Montgomery Jan 22 at 18:14
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As you have already read from the other question, "Requires editing" creates more work for everyone. It should only be reserved where the question is already on-topic and well-researched, and needs a little formatting help from other experienced users.

Moderators are not Stack Exchange employees/developers. We cannot change the button text or descriptions, or even remove Triage altogether. You'll need to create a proper but I'm sure it has been requested multiple times before, so just search for one and upvote it (and wait 6 to 8 weeks).

Yes, many users abuse "Requires editing". In fact at any point in time, over half of review-banned users are banned because of this reason. Unfortunately moderators cannot do anything other than handing out review bans to temporarily halt the incorrect actions and highlight this issue.

See also: Feature request to fix Triage

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    "I'm sure it has been requested multiple times" yes, at least multiple times...I've definitely seen several requests (ultimately linked as dupes of an original) but basically any time somebody finds out what "Requires Editing" does, I'm pretty sure their first though is "Shouldn't this be renamed?". I know that's what mine was... – VLAZ Jan 21 at 7:34
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    The whole approach should just be burned to the ground ... – GhostCat Jan 21 at 8:56
  • What exactly should be “burned to the ground”, @GhostCat? – Cody Gray Jan 22 at 5:30
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    @CodyGray The whole idea of triaging? Not only are most decisions wrong there ... I also noticed that many people that actually edit low quality posts later on did a pretty bad job. – GhostCat Jan 22 at 7:30
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    On the back of this, maybe "Requires editing" should be removed altogether. How often (a) does it reflect what's actually possible, and (b) is it used correctly? – jpp Jan 22 at 11:30
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    "Requires editing" is confusing because it's not clear whether it means "requires editing from the OP" or "requires editing from other community members." I'll freely admit that I myself used it wrong at first because I was confused on that point. – EJoshuaS - Reinstate Monica Jan 22 at 13:56
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That's because it feels like a catch-all option, even though I know the guide does not say so.

That's your problem.

Don't use "looks okay" as a catch-all. A good rule of thumb is only use "looks okay" if you could edit the question or answer yourself and fix it. If there is something in it you can't fix it yourself, then you probably shouldn't use "looks okay."

The reason for this is when you use that option, that review item actually goes into another queue where higher rep users have the option to edit and fix whatever is wrong with it. If they can't, it causes frustration. They simply have to skip that question instead of editing it.

By using "looks okay" as a catch-all, you're actually filling that other queue with things that can't be fixed. Not by the users of that queue, anyway. The overall effect is that the quality and effectiveness of that queue is lessened a a result.

Instead, use "skip" as a catch-all. It doesn't penalize you, and it doesn't mess up another queue.

Clicking Unsalvageable is problematic for me because with my reputation, I can only flag 11 times a day. Once I've reached that count, I can no longer click Unsalvageable.

I understand your frustration.

The best way I would say to look at this is to instead of spending time flagging, spend time answering. The reason being is once you pass 3k in reputation, you will actually be able to click "Unsalvagable" 50 times a day (with some limitations) instead. Plus, getting better at answering questions is a good skill to have and is part of the main focus of the site anyway.

You also having the option of giving a lot of helpful flags. That will increase your daily flag count. To do that, you will need to take some time and learn what flags are usually considered helpful and what ones are not. This will give you a deeper understanding of how the site works and decrease the likelihood of you getting banned.


In my defence, the official Triage guide feels too lengthy for beginners like me to understand.

  1. Would moderators consider improving triaging guidelines for Skip so that it's more obvious that it should be the default? (For example, by putting the Skip button first, or by making it explicit in the guidelines)?

  2. Do other reviewers abuse Requires Editing? I don't feel like I am alone in this mistake.

Agreed. The Triage guidelines are notorious for being confusing. As for your other questions:

  1. It has been been discussed once or twice.

  2. No, you most certainly are not the only one. Lots of people do this. Let's try to change that.

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