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I believe that ban is too heavy and requires improvement.

How can I get out of a question ban? Begin by improving your existing questions: do as much as possible to make them clear, specific and on-topic.

The ban will be lifted automatically by the system when it determines that your positive contributions outweigh the cost of those questions which were poorly received.

  1. Downvotes do happen for various reasons, not always because the question is poorly written.

  2. I did rewrite some questions, but "automated system" doesn't give any feedback. You know, when you hover a button it shows a hover effect, when you click - it shows a click effect. But rewriting a question doesn't show any progress bar or anything like "You did good improving question, but need a little better". That silence is just weird, I don't understand if I did any progress or made it worse.

  3. It is unfair, since some users will always manipulate votes, even if you make it super hard, they will still ask for upvotes from their colleagues or chats. Those who never manipulate votes just end up taking all the consequences.

  4. 6 months ban is a really really long-term punishment.

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    Do you have examples for #1 where you feel something has been downvoted objectively wrongly? And there's no automated system to tell you how good you did. If there was, we wouldn't be talking about this at all, since then the system wouldn't allow you to post your question if it didn't clear the bar in the first place. This is next-generation AI type stuff. For the time being, it's all human. – deceze Jan 20 at 10:21
  • @deceze Downvotes might happen, when you get various answers, but select your own answer as accepted, which is also different from all the other answers. So other authors rage downvote. In general, similar emotions might result in downvote as well. – Sam Tyurenkov Jan 20 at 10:30
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    You have any proof for this ^^ comment. Or, indeed, for the allegations (Nr. 3, specifically) in the question? – Cindy Meister Jan 20 at 10:31
  • While that might happen, 1) it's probably not terribly common, 2) you can moderator flag that user/post to ask for that to be resolved if you're sure you have a strong case there, and last but not least 3) that probably doesn't happen enough to cause a question ban for you. (If it does, see 2.) – deceze Jan 20 at 10:33
  • @CindyMeister There is no voting system in the world that's not being manipulated, it can even be legit, not a multiaccounting or botting. Just some users do ask for votes and others don't. – Sam Tyurenkov Jan 20 at 10:41
  • @deceze So I should flag a post after editing it, to have it rechecked by moderator and there is no automated system. Why does a tooltip then says there is an automated system for that. I think every author downvoted me here for example: stackoverflow.com/questions/56358303/… – Sam Tyurenkov Jan 20 at 10:44
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    Deleted questions, score <= 0: (1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... – Samuel Liew Jan 20 at 10:44
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    11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20) – Samuel Liew Jan 20 at 10:45
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    No, you should not flag for moderators after editing a question. When you edit a question, it goes into a review queue, where it will be reviewed by other users. That's the human part. There's no AI to review your question and judge it. That's what I meant. — The part about flagging for moderators is for when you think some other user is harming you, e.g. with unwarranted downvotes. – deceze Jan 20 at 10:47
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    On 1) - absolutely true. Sometimes the downvotes are because there was no research going into the question. There was at least one occurrence I saw where a user posted links to the documentation about two different things...and asked how the two are different. So, there was research going into "what is A and B" but it wasn't followed up by reading any information in the links. And the difference wasn't hard to grasp - it was literally outlined within the first sentences of each article. – VLAZ Jan 20 at 11:00
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    so 2 things: 1) for your point number 2: HOW*? You make it sound so easy for an automated system to determine if you really improved or not... there's a lot to calculate there. How would the automated system calculate if it's truly improved? now that that's being said..... you have twenty deleted questions, all scoring under 0. I don't wanna sound dismissive, but if you were an automated system trying to determine if the next content coming from you is good or bad, where would you bet? That's why you're currently blocked. And at TWENTY free chances, I don't think 6 months is "harsh". – Patrice Jan 20 at 14:14
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    I have never once seen a question ban applied that was a false positive, independent of votes. Do you have evidence of one that was? – Cody Gray Jan 20 at 18:34
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    @SamuelLiew Dang! Those comment length limits ... – rene Jan 20 at 18:43
  • When you edit a question, it goes into a review queue @deceze But that's only for the first edit following a closure, right? Subsequent edits don't do anything other than bump the question to the top of the active list. – BSMP Jan 21 at 0:50
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Downvotes do happen for various reasons, not always because the question is poorly written.

There's a tooltip on the downvote button. Downvotes should happen if a question does not show research effort, is unclear or not useful. Do all your questions avoid all of those pitfalls? If you've deleted 20 of them, I posit that the answer to that is no.

I did rewrite some questions, but "automated system" doesn't give any feedback. You know, when you hover a button it shows a hover effect, when you click - it shows a click effect. But rewriting a question doesn't show any progress bar or anything like "You did good improving question, but need a little better". That silence is just weird, I don't understand if I did any progress or made it worse.

The automated system merely counts the number of downvoted and deleted questions. When people start upvoting your questions, that's your feedback. There's no AI judging your questions here.

It is unfair, since some users will always manipulate votes, even if you make it super hard, they will still ask for upvotes from their colleagues or chats. Those who never manipulate votes just end up taking all the consequences.

If you have evidence that's happening flag for moderator attention. Moderators can see voting pattern and if there are users that vote for each other excessively they have the tools to catch and deal with them.

6 months ban is a really really long-term punishment.

Wasting our time asking 20+ questions that you've then deleted shows that you're not learning and not concerned at all with anyone else. There are lots of other people who have useful questions that might not be answered because the people who might answer that question are instead dealing with your poorly written questions, which you're going to delete anyway.

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  • I didnt delete all 20, some were automatically removed by Community, even those I answered, some are deleted 2 years ago, but you still judge me for deleting them, is it fair? – Sam Tyurenkov Jan 20 at 11:54
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    There's a finite number of people who answer questions. Is it fair to keep asking them to read yours when they are continually low quality rather than other people's? – Robert Longson Jan 20 at 11:58
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    @Sam no one is judging you. Put yourself in the shoes of an automated system. You have 29 visible questions. 21 are at 0 or less. 20 are deleted and under 0. If you were an automated system meant to calculate if your next contribution was worth it... how would you guess? – Patrice Jan 20 at 14:58
  • Well, I'm a Google Ads and Google Analytics customer, and those services point me to ask for support at Stackoverflow. However I can't ask any questions, because of question ban, because some of my 2 years old questions were low quality. Phone support sadly doesn't know much about Measurement Protocol. – Sam Tyurenkov Jan 20 at 18:36
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    @SamTyurenkov That's unfortunate, but SO can't be held responsible for Google choosing to outsource their support here, nor is it SO's responsibility to change their rules to accomodate for Google's bad decisions. I'd suggest taking that up with Google. – ivarni Jan 21 at 5:28

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