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Official abbreviation for: import scipy as sp/sc

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I feel like Stack Overflow was so much more lenient during its early days.

As a test, I paraphrased that question with the exact content, then reposted it.

As expected, it was down-voted to hell and closed due to being an opinionated question.

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    I don't see any close votes on it. You appear to have sufficient rep to vote to close, so.... – Heretic Monkey Jan 8 at 22:39
  • Typical self-answered Q+A, lame question but good answer. So what you did wrong is not post a good answer ;) – Hans Passant Jan 8 at 22:51
  • That Q&A doesn't even make sense to me. The answer is about something else than the question. I wonder why OP chose the topic of aliases to explain how to import sub-modules from a lib. – Tom Jan 8 at 22:53
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    Why wouldn't it survive? It's an on-topic question. – ayhan Jan 8 at 22:55
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    @Tom "How to do X?" with "You never should do X, here is why [and you should do Y instead]" answer is perfectly fine Q/A pair. That's exactly how linked question looks to me... – Alexei Levenkov Jan 9 at 8:10
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I feel like Stack Overflow was so much more lenient during its early days.

It absolutely was. We’ve learned a lot over the years about what works well and what doesn’t.

It's still "lenient" today, in the sense that some questions "fall through the cracks"—i.e., fail to get noticed and closed. That doesn't, in and of itself, imply that the questions are suitable for Stack Overflow.

As a test, I paraphrased that question with the exact content, then posted it.

Please don't run such tests. This is just contributing to the noise level, and may even be considered abusive behavior. In the future, if you want to know the community's opinion on something, you can ask about it on Meta, as you've done here.

Official abbreviation for: import scipy as sp/sc
[…]
As expected, it was down-voted to hell and closed due to being an opinionated question.

Quoting myself in my comment to Makoto:

I don't perceive the question as being broad or opinion-soliciting. It isn't asking "what aliases to use". It's asking if there is an official preference in the documentation or elsewhere for two constructs that are apparently functionally identical. That's a perfectly valid question. I don't know if the answers are good or relevant, but the question itself is fine as presented. I re-opened the question.

In other words, it's no real mystery how the question survived. The mystery is why the question ever got closed in the first place.

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  • Then again, you could just add "official" in front of every opinionated question, and they'll all fall through the cracks. – NoName Jan 9 at 16:29
  • "What library should I officially use for parsing HTML?" is always going to be off-topic, as it's soliciting recommendations. The "opinionated" label is a bit of a red-herring. Plenty of good Stack Overflow questions involve opinions. See also: Gorilla vs. Shark (TL;DR: scoping matters). – Cody Gray Jan 9 at 18:22
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There's like three things that need to be unpacked in this...

First and foremost - there's nothing wrong with that original question. It's describing a circumstance in which someone is using a Python alias to access one of the most popular Python libraries - scipy.

Now, in and of itself, a question asking "what aliases to use" is probably going to be too broad on any good day. If asked today, I wouldn't be surprised if it were closed within an instant of it being detected.

But what saves this question are the two stellar answers attached to it which reference actual documentation on why you shouldn't import scipy as <whatever>.

We don't destroy value. The question is not valuable, but the answers to it are. Closing it is too aggressive of a response since it implies that it's unsuitable for the site. I believe that this question was fine as asked, and if we don't want it opened anymore, then we should be leveraging a historical lock for this.

See, this is the kind of stuff that should have historical locks on it. Clearly the community has an opinion on the topicality of it, but the answer brought forth is insightful, well-documented and could help others in the future if they ever face this issue.

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    The current closure environment doesn't seem conducive towards allowing or encouraging valuable answers. – Travis J Jan 8 at 22:55
  • This is why we have diamond moderators, @TravisJ. We should invoke one of them to come in and lock the question instead. I won't disagree that we are only given blunt objects to deal with "a mob" and our instinct tells us to hold the object above our heads, but we can rationalize on Meta if that's the right posture to take. I wish it could happen before the fact but that's seldom the way this works; being proactive as opposed to reactive is not a thing that can be built into a curation community. – Makoto Jan 8 at 22:57
  • A diamond mod can lock this specific question, but that doesn't address new content. Moderators have zero ability to change the closure environment itself. "being reactive as opposed to proactive is not a thing that can be built into a curation community"... This is a fundamental problem right now. Stack Overflow was primarily built to answer questions, not to curate years old content. The repository being built was always a byproduct. The point was to get answers. We need to be a content creation community in order to survive. – Travis J Jan 8 at 23:00
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    I don't perceive the question as being broad or opinion-soliciting. It isn't asking "what aliases to use". It's asking if there is an official preference in the documentation or elsewhere for two constructs that are apparently functionally identical. That's a perfectly valid question. I don't know if the answers are good or relevant, but the question itself is fine as presented. I re-opened the question and see no cause for a lock. – Cody Gray Jan 8 at 23:26

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