14

Take a question like the below (image rather than link to avoid everyone boarding the "down-vote train"):

enter image description here

This is clearly a poor quality question. There's no evidence of any research, no attempts, not even a question (at least the data is isn't an image though, but often that is the case too). Although clear, the OP should be making every effort to post a better question or try and do something themselves. It's very unlikely it's going to be useful to any future readers as well.

What I see very often, however, is people answering these really poor quality questions, and thus providing the OP with a solution. Often, I do sometimes feel that these answers shouldn't be posted as the question is far from going to contribute to Stack Overflow's ideal of having a repository of good, quality questions. The fact that these questions do get answers, in m50867y opinion, promotes that poor quality questions are "ok"; because they will still get answers. is that really what we want?

That isn't, however, to say that the answer is of low quality, so I don't think downvoting them is necessarily the correct action; the answer themself is useful but likely only to the OP, and only ever the OP.

Is simply downvoting, and flagging/voting to close the best action for these? Even if that leaves the questions answered, and with a solution? That doesn't really teach the OP the rules/guidelines of the site, as many of these users turn up, "demand" the completion of their work, and leave; only to return when they "demand" another free consultancy service.

Yes, the inbuilt banning system will likely ban them, but I'm also tired of seeing exact duplicate questions from different accounts because of such people posting questions like this. Eventually one of the awful questions gets an answer, and the OP gets their "free consultancy" service. Then, when they want it again, they just start making accounts again. Yes I realise such activity is against the rules, but custom mod flags for these literally take days to be processed ( I have a flag from 16 December still pending for such behaviour).

I suppose my closing question, in a sense is this:

Should an answer, even if it's of "good" or "ok" quality be downvoted if it's in response to an exceptionally poor quality question? If not, what actions should be taken to get the OP to actually improve their question, when they've likely already got their answer and should the answerer be advised that answering such questions does not positively contribute the communities goals?

Comment response to suggested duplicate (in case the comment is deleted):

@gnat no; this isn't so much about the low quality question and more the answers I see from others to said question. I already down-vote, vote to close the question. I suppose, in a sense, I'm suggesting/asking whether the answers should be considered low quality as well, when the question is so poor.

Seems my comments have been ignored about my explanation of why this isn't a duplicate, and no one has commented to say why that are incorrect. (It also seems that when saying "No" to the prompt and edited the question to explain why it does not remove the votes as the prompt suggests it does.) As mentioned, the question marked as a duplicate does not answer this question. The answer from deceze♦ did answer this well though.

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  • @gnat no; this isn't so much about the low quality question and more the answers I see from others to said question. I already down-vote, vote to close the question. I suppose, in a sense, I'm suggesting/asking whether the answers should be considered low quality as well, when the question is so poor. – Larnu Dec 20 '19 at 15:32
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    I have similar concerns about answering known duplicates (i.e. Qs where the dupe has already been indicated but are not yet closed). I have done this once or twice, with very brief answers that include a reference/link to the dupe, but this has elicited mixed responses from the community: some say OK, others downvoting my answer and saying I shouldn't have posted. (In my latest such, today, I actually left a comment 'inviting' requests for self-deletion.) – Adrian Mole Dec 20 '19 at 15:48
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    Personally I do tend to downvote answers to known duplicates, @AdrianMole , especially when the other question has a wealth of answers. The new answer is then not useful (to the community) in my view. If the answer is bringing something new as an idea, they would be better posting it on the well established question/answer page; then future readers have even more choices and the answer is useful. That's my opinion anyway. I have, however, found that commenting my opinion results in "revenge" votes, so I don't comment any more. But this question isn't about the immaturity of revenge votes. – Larnu Dec 20 '19 at 15:53
  • @Larnu But sometimes, although the dupe may be similar enough (conceptually) to qualify as a dupe, a short answer may clarify the OP's actual question. However, I am also aware that posting an answer (esp. if it gets accepted/upvoted) can make future clean-up operations a bit trickier. – Adrian Mole Dec 20 '19 at 15:57
  • But if it's conceptually a duplicate, it's not really a duplicate, @AdrianMole ;) Or, at least, I would be less likely the downvote the answer if the provisional duplicate is accepted as the duplicate. – Larnu Dec 20 '19 at 16:02
  • Would appreciate from those voting to close that they explain why they feel this is a duplicate, when i have explained why it is not. Thanks. – Larnu Dec 20 '19 at 16:11
  • Experience has taught me that posts like this are almost never updated to be anything resembling a question (as opposed to a request for free labour). So I've stopped interacting with them so the roomba can handle it – Sayse Dec 20 '19 at 16:15
  • Key problem with that, @Sayse : "has no answers" or (for the last 9 days) "has no answers with a score > 0". Because of these answers, they don't get deleted, even if they are closed. if "Roomba" deleted these questions still, I would suggest that would addresses my points. For the questions I've shown above, the question is now at a score of -6 and is closed, however, there is an answer with a score of 2. – Larnu Dec 20 '19 at 16:20
  • @Larnu - In that case, I still close/vote in the hope that the question gets deleted and makes anyone answering the question consider whether its worth the effort answering questions that are likely to be deleted – Sayse Dec 20 '19 at 16:23
  • But it never will, as (at least) one answer has a positive score (now at +3), @Sayse . For the example above, I've now voted to delete it, but I've seen plenty of questions like this where they never get to the end of the delete queue, and so these poor questions are "preserved for all time". – Larnu Dec 20 '19 at 16:26
  • Possibly the real problem here is people upvoting answers to these questions? Is an answer "useful" when there it's actually a response to a demand for work. I'd argue not; but i wouldn't be able to argue it's unuseful. – Larnu Dec 20 '19 at 16:26
  • 'Often, I do sometimes feel that these answers shouldn't be posted as the question is far from going to contribute to Stack Overflow's ideal of having a repository of good, quality questions. The fact that these questions do get answers, in my opinion, promotes that poor quality questions are "ok"; because they will still get answers. is that really what we want?' - This is a good point, but if it's their first question give them a pass. For next time take action. – incapaz Dec 20 '19 at 17:21
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    @incapaz Eh. I dislike any judgement based on the newness of a user. That creates problems down the line, once we decide the user is no longer new. It sets differing expectations. – fbueckert Dec 20 '19 at 17:48
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    @Larnu How so? We expect all users to adhere to the standards, 1 rep or 38k rep. Just like anyone new to a language, it's not the beginner part that matters, but how the question meets quality standards. – fbueckert Dec 20 '19 at 18:03
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    Of course clicking “No” doesn’t remove the votes. That would be far too open to abuse. The comment chain here is far too long to expect anyone to read it all; that’s probably why your objections to the duplicate seemed to be ignored. I added a couple of other duplicates that I think are more relevant. – Cody Gray Dec 20 '19 at 20:46
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I was never a big fan of punishing answerers, and recently I’ve come to think it’s positively counter productive on a grander scale.

When an answer is posted, the damage is already done. The answerers have spent their time, that’s not recoverable. Punishing them for it doesn’t help anyone. The flood of bad questions clearly doesn’t subside, however much we want it to. Unless the answer gets deleted before OP had a chance to read it, they’ve already got their solution. The only real thing that can happen is that you tick answerers off and make them frustrated or afraid of answering anything anymore in fear of wasting their time. That’s an outcome nobody needs. And then it’ll spur complaints about new contributors having no chance to accumulate points and elitism and whatnot.

Just punish the question and the asker, not the answerer. If the system is working as intended, that will stop them from asking bad questions in the long run. And who knows, maybe, just maybe, the question gets edited into shape retroactively and we’ll have a useful contribution.

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  • Here here, here here! – Funk Forty Niner Dec 22 '19 at 3:29
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    There there. There there. – deceze Dec 22 '19 at 7:08
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Should an answer, even if it's of "good" or "ok" quality be downvoted if it's in response to an exceptionally poor quality question?

No, it should not. Downvote and/or close the poor quality question, but do not downvote a good answer. The system provides enough granularity to vote up/down, close and remove questions, answer and comments separately. There can be a great answer to a very poor quality question. Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater. Perhaps not in the case shown, but in some other cases. I have seen on SO many answers that are useful to me (not just to the OP), even though the question from the OP is (very) poor quality, see examples below.

If not, what actions should be taken to get the OP to actually improve their question, when they've likely already got their answer?

  • Downvote and add suggestions in the comments to the OP on how to edit the question to improve quality. There are some users that will fix questions after specific, polite feedback that assumes good intentions on their part.

  • Hope that the OP or another user - often the one who answers the question - would edit and improve the question. This can happen years later in some cases.

  • Edit and improve the question yourself. Even a little improvement can show the OP an example for further improvements.

  • Do nothing. I often found that my assumptions that a question is of poor quality are wrong, and other users think otherwise.

Should the answerer be advised that answering such questions does not positively contribute [towards the community's] goals?

  • It depends. Mostly it depends on the question and the answer. It also depends on the community (I am saying this because, even though this discussion is on meta.SO, it can be useful for other SE sites). In many cases, the answerer needs no advice. That's because there is in fact a net benefit to the community from a great answer to a bad question.

Examples of poor quality SO questions with great answers useful to more than just the OP:

How to split/cut till specific path (directory path )of string in perl
perl hash printing the value of a key
How do I remove specific element from an array?
The lightest way to know if 2 arrays are different?

The general pattern of such "bad question, good question" threads is: downvoted question, upvoted answer, multiple views. That's provided the questions were not closed and deleted before they got enough views. :)

Note that upvotes and downvotes on these may change with time, due to meta effect from people following these links and voting. At the time of this writing, these questions all followed the general pattern above.

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-3

The same advice applies from this question

Don't ever answer an off-topic question, not via chat, comments, or any other way.

The catch there is they never really talk about why. When a question is low quality it's subject to deletion. Since you're a trusted user, you have access to the single greatest tool necessary: delete votes. What's elegant about this is that we're taking action against the question. Yes, it will remove the answers as well, but that's not our concern. If you answer a terrible question, you run the risk that any reputation/points/etc. gained may be undone by deletion later.

Never downvote an answer just because you thought the question shouldn't be answered. Impugning motives like that will never go well, and worse, those trying to help via comments will get the blame. Close, delete and move on.

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    A question that is low quality isn't really "off topic" though; Off-Topic is a separate closure reason. – Larnu Dec 20 '19 at 17:12

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