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Some questions can be answered by many responders, but that does not mean that they should receive many answers, all in one go, without each responder having read existing answers.

Case: Simple Java question and 10 people who know the answer found that question as it is with 0 answers. They all start writing their answer. A good answer in this case may take up to 10 minutes to nicely outline, reason and format.

Suggestion: Above the "Your Answer" editor, there could be a current count of people who are already typing in it.

Benefits:

  • Prevents wasting time of responders. If they see that 9 other people are already on it, perhaps they would like to wait a while and see if they can actually contribute to the topic
  • Better quality answers. Since responders might choose to wait and see if the answers are any good, they may be able to add a better answer
  • Include responders that have something important to say but they don't want to post a whole answer. Once they see someone is on it, they might be more inclined to wait and just provide their addition as an edit
  • Less "moving target" accidents. If the asker sees that someone is writing an answer, they might want to stop editing for a little while, to not make the impeding answer rely on an obsolete version of the question
  • Some traffic economy (I guess having less answers all committed at the same time on a question will benefit the back-end of Stack Exchange a little)

Drawbacks:

  • Some good answers might be lost, if responders feel that the topic is getting enough attention already
  • Added work to the server, which will have to add/subtract from the answer count in real time

Other thoughts:

  • Maybe instead of counting the number of responders, the widget will show the sum of reputation of the responders currently "on it". This will be a better indicator of the incoming quality of answers
  • If a responder spends "too much time" in the editor, their count should be substracted (to avoid all sorts of false positive answer counts)
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    If many people immediately know the answer, it seems very likely the question is a duplicate. Just a thought. – Don't Panic Nov 19 at 17:47
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    Related: Fastest Gun in the West (FGITW) – Peter Mortensen Nov 19 at 17:51
  • How do you differentiate between someone who has started to write an answer but stopped for some reason versus someone actively writing an answer – Joe W Nov 19 at 17:54
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    Can't imagine the software in its current state supporting that. You may have noticed that the SO front end isn't exactly the cutting edge in web apps. – Chuck Adams Nov 19 at 17:54
  • @Chuck Adams: But they may be forced, one way or the other, to innovate soon. – Peter Mortensen Nov 19 at 17:56
  • @PeterMortensen What SO does is motivated by the profit it brings the parent company, nothing more or less. – Chuck Adams Nov 19 at 17:58
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    I second @Don'tPanic's comment. Also, the moving target is as much the fault of the answerers as it is of the askers. If the question is unclear, don't answer with a guess. Wait until the clarification has been made, then answer. – Heretic Monkey Nov 19 at 18:07
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    If they see that 9 other people are already on it, perhaps they would like to wait a while and see if they can actually contribute to the topic --> who will wait for who? – Temani Afif Nov 19 at 19:32
  • the widget will show the sum of reputation of the responders currently "on it". This will be a better indicator of the incoming quality of answers --> how will I know if it's Jon Skeet writting his answer or 100 users having less reputation? – Temani Afif Nov 19 at 19:34
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    @JoeW very pertinent question. If there is a code snippet, I might click "Copy to answer" and play around with it without actually intending to post anything. So, I'm writing in the answer box but I'm not writing an answer. – VLAZ Nov 19 at 21:27
3

Cynical take:

If ten people know the question, then that question is likely a duplicate and should be closed instead of answered.

Practical take:

This doesn't have any bearing or traction in low-volume tags, which would result in a negative experience for users who ask questions in more niche technologies.

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